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A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier

Написано Ishmael Beah

Озвучено Ishmael Beah


A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier

Написано Ishmael Beah

Озвучено Ishmael Beah

оценки:
4.5/5 (239 оценки)
Длина:
7 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Mar 20, 2007
ISBN:
9781427202314
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

This is how wars are fought now by children, hopped up on drugs, and wielding AK-47s. In the more than fifty violent conflicts going on worldwide, it is estimated that there are some 300,000 child soldiers.

Ishmael Beah used to be one of them. How does one become a killer? How does one stop? Child soldiers have been profiled by journalists, and novelists have struggled to imagine their lives. But it is rare to find a first-person account from someone who endured this hell and survived.

In A Long Way Gone Beah, now twenty-six years old, tells a riveting story in his own words: how, at the age of twelve, he fled attacking rebels and wandered a land rendered unrecognizable by violence. By thirteen, he'd been picked up by the government army, and Beah, at heart a gentle boy, found that he was capable of truly terrible acts. This is a rare and mesmerizing account, told with real literary force and heartbreaking honesty.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Издатель:
Издано:
Mar 20, 2007
ISBN:
9781427202314
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Ishmael Beah, born in 1980 in Sierra Leone, West Africa, is the New York Times bestselling author of A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier. The book has been published in over thirty languages and was nominated for a Quill Award in 2007. Time magazine named the book as one of the top ten nonfiction books of 2007, ranking it at number three. His work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Vespertine Press, LIT, Parabola, and numerous academic journals. He is a UNICEF Ambassador and Advocate for Children Affected by War; a member of the Human Rights Watch Children’s Rights Advisory Committee; an advisory board member at the Center for the Study of Youth and Political Violence at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville; visiting scholar at the Center for International Conflict Resolution at Columbia University; visiting Senior Research Fellow at the Center for the Study of Genocide, Conflict Resolution, and Human Rights at Rutgers University; cofounder of the Network of Young People Affected by War (NYPAW); and president of the Ishmael Beah Foundation. He has spoken before the United Nations, the Council on Foreign Relations, and many panels on the effects of war on children. He is a graduate of Oberlin College with a B.A. in Political Science and resides in Brooklyn, New York.

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4.3
239 оценки / 186 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    A difficult book to read, but very worthwhile.
  • (4/5)
    Insight into the lives of boy soldiers in Sierra Leone during a civil war. The violence is unimaginable, yet this memoir shows the compassion and feelings of its author. Knowing he survived is the only thing that kept me reading as the harshness of war tormented Ishmael and those he met.
  • (4/5)
    This is another one of those books that is horrible to read but vitally important to understand. In particular, those of us privileged enough to live in safe countries where these sort of events seem like nightmares from another world and we are so concerned with our own safety that we would deny entry to folks fleeing atrocities of this nature.I have tremendous gratitude to Mr. Beah for sharing this deeply personal and intimate story.
  • (3/5)
    To be honest, I wasn't able to finish this book. I got about halfway through but the violence in it was too much to stomach. I feel so bad for what he went through, I can't even fathom it. What I did read was well written and I'm sure if I would have been able to finish it I would have given it four or five stars.
  • (4/5)
    A very, very well-written book. Tis almost too well-written. I would say that the likelihood of the author getting help for the writing is pretty high, ut that does not detract from the book. Nor does the controversy by the muckraking Australian press. Beah's tale is an awful one and one worthy of reading by a wide audience. Well done, yet quite sad.
  • (5/5)
    Very good.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent book about Seira Leon's bloody emergence from a colony to independence and freedom. Ishmael tells his story as one caught in the middle of the corrupt National Army and the violent freedom fighters of the RUF. His survival is nothing short of a miracle and his life is dedicated to helping the world understand how decisions made by nations affect children thousands of miles away.
  • (4/5)
    A memoir of a young boy in Sierra Leone, Africa. This autobiography follows the story of his life from when he was a young boy, to losing everything, becoming a child solider, and finding life after war. Ishmael Beah is like any young boy he has hobbies, interests, and dreams. He also faces the struggles of living in a split home. Ishmael relies heavily on his brother especially after the raiding of his home village and losing his parents. This memoir tells the experiences and life changing events that Ishmael went through and how being in war altered his view on life and his own people. This is a gripping image of what war truly is like and the after effects it causes. I think this would be a great book for a high school classroom. Especially if the teacher would like to teach on the themes of war, effects of war, different cultural societies, or even the differences of kids/teenagers lives based on where they live.
  • (4/5)
    Powerful, vivid story, but I wish more had been said about his life in the U.S. and how he adjusted.
  • (5/5)
    Intense story of a young boy soldier who overvcame the odds to become a us citizen and author.
  • (5/5)
    Ishmael is such an unassuming story teller sharing horrific experiences so eloquently and authentically. The gentleness of his voice belies the violence, making it easier to bare, but also showing the depth of his thoughtful nature.
    A very good way to understand the atrocity of child soldiers.
  • (5/5)
    Phenomenal book, and story, would highly recommend, was absolutely speechless multiple times! Excellent storytelling read by the author him self.
  • (5/5)
    Extraordinarily readable/listenable account of a young teenager’s survival of repeated tragic loss of family and, not least, the belief in his own guilt after being recruited as a child soldier. One learns a lot about people in war.
    Beah’s story ends happily; but there seem to be very few that do the same.
  • (4/5)
    In plain unremarkable prose, Beah provides a rare accounting of what it was like to be a child solider in the Sierra Leonian army during the civil war. After a traumatizing early life that robbed Ishamael Beah of his youth first as a refugee and then a child soldier in the Sierra Leonian army fighting the RUF during the civil war in the 1990s, Beah was rehabilitied through UNICEF programs and ultimately came to the US to study and write his memoirs. Unflinchingly, he writes of the atrocities he and his fellow soldiers committed and the mentality that enabled him to enact such brutality. Fortunately, Beah's memoir is neither permeated with a wrenching need for forgiveness, nor a solipsistic demeaner, but rather he tells his war stories as he saw them, including how much he hated being told that what he did was 'not his fault'. Uniquely a personal story of a child soldier, Beah largely stays away the whys and wherefores of the politics and power that led to such a mess, and this is just as well since Beah was basically ignorant of it himself at the time. Nevertheless, from this book alone, the unfamiliar reader may have a hard time getting a sense of why the war happened in the first place, the current (as of writing) state of Sierra Leone, where the country will go from here, or any sense of how this type of warfare and use and abuse of children soldiers can be prevented in the future in Africa or elsewhere.
  • (5/5)
    The entire life story of Ishmael is touching to the human soul. The tragedy’s that led him to become a soldier in a seemingly endless war, than the evolution of his rehabilitation into a gentleman is amazing. To than aim to share his stories of loss and anguish to show the world that something needed to be done
  • (4/5)
    Ishmael Beah was only 12 years old when the war in Sierra Leone hit his village and sent everyone running for their lives. He got separated from his family and he ran for a long time. While trying to survive and stay away from the fighting, he was eventually caught and trained as a soldier. This is the story of his journey and how he eventually ended up escaping Sierra Leone for New York City.There was a smaller portion of the book spent on his time as a soldier than I'd expected. A lot of it was the initial running away, and there was also a good portion of it after he quit being a soldier (I just don't want to say too much about what happened, for those who want to read the book and find out how it happened!). Overall, though, it was very good. I wanted to keep reading to find out what would happen and how he finally got away. Heartbreaking that this kind of thing happens, though. We are so lucky in North America...
  • (4/5)
    As this book begins, young Ishmael is growing up a relatively carefree young man in Sierra Leone. Civil war changes everything when Ishmael and his friends are forced to flee the oncoming rebel forces. In the coming months the boys encounter rebels and angry villagers who mistake them for young rebels, hunger, fear, and great sadness. Eventually he becomes a government soldier and the results are chilling. Mr. Beah is quite blunt about the violence but never overly graphic. This young man's journey through hell, the rehabilitation, and eventually to the U.S. are incredible.
  • (4/5)
    In 1993, 12-year-old Ishmael Beah went with his brother and friends to visit family and perform rap music. The civil war in Sierra Leone, up to that point just a story in their village, quickly becomes a part of their lives as they find themselves on the run. This is Ishmael's story growing up as a teenager and being forced to participate in war.Such as heart-wrenching story is hard to read but so very important. When I read stories halfway across the world that throw out numbers and statistics, it's hard to put a human face on that kind of suffering, but that's exactly what Ishmael's memoir does. I would not be surprised to learn if writing out such a terrifying experience was cathartic for him as well, and I'm amazed by the courage it takes to share such a story with the world. There were moments where the narrative sounded "off" - maybe because he's not a native speaker of English? - though after awhile I just went with the rhythm and stopped noticing. I wouldn't read it through again, and at times it was hard for me to read even 50 pages at a time, but wow. What a powerful story.
  • (5/5)
    Terribly sad but one of the best memoirs I have read in a long, long time.
  • (5/5)
    Ismaeh Beah recounts how he was recruited, against his will, to be a child soldier in Sierra Leone. This is a riveting story of how innocent children are exposed to violence and forced to commit horrible acts in order to survive. I was especially horrified at how relentlessly soldiers recruited children to fight their war. The accounts are sometimes graphic but necessary in order to understand the conditions that Beah lived through. This book is recommeded for young adult readers from grade 10 upward.
  • (5/5)
    I remember being young when I first heard about the war in Sierra Leone.. it wasn't long after we had finished discussing the start of the Gulf War "Current Events" class. (long before the war actually started in '98). These wars always perplex me, because it's never truly known why they happen. The RUF and the army were doing the same things and for the same reason, and yet they were enemies. To me, that makes no sense. There's controversy surrounding this book, as there are with ANY book on a topic such as this. Whether this book is fact or fiction is really irrelevant. The events of the war took place just as described; whether or not the boy named Ishmael in the story is actually the author doesn't matter. This book could have been written by ANYONE who had a place as a soldier in the war. Don't let the controversy take away from the very real problem of militant and rebel armies recruiting young boys (usually between the ages of 7-16) to die for their causes. This is an issue that's been known to our world since before the war in Sierra Leone and will continue to be a problem until there's a way to prevent it from continuing.This book takes you "behind the scenes". Told through the eyes of a boy who was forced to become a soldier in Sierra Leone. It tells how it happened, what went on while he was a soldier, and how he coped and rediscovered who he really is. The story is heartbreaking and I cried for Ishmael more than once while reading of the things that went on. My heart broke for the childhood so brutally ripped away from him because of the war, and for each and every friend and family member he lost. There were times I smiled to, his first trip to New York is amazing story all on its own, but the reader is quickly reminded that was just a small intermission to the main focus of the story. There are many many tribe stories interwoven in this book, each one is told exactly where it needs to be to help the reader better understand what Ishmael was thinking at that point in time.I hope Ishmael has found some peace in his heart and his soul after writing his account.. I hope every person who reads this book understands and realizes that Sierra Leone isn't the only country to use children as soldiers.. and that it could just as easily be our country some day.This book is NOT for the casual reader, obviously given what the book is about, there is a lot of talk about death and how commanders would brainwash the boys into killing the enemy. There are a few very detailed scenes that I wouldn't recommend the weak of heart or mind read as well. This book isn't a walk in the park, it's not going to bring a smile to the reader's face when it ends... But perhaps it will open the reader's eyes to the things people in war torn countries have to endure.I give this book 5 of 5 paws
  • (4/5)
    Civil war and government change is taking over region where Ismael lives with family. He is a common teenager and finds listening to hip hop music with friends to reading Shakespeare with his father. Ismael's village is attacked because the revolution is spreading across the area. He and his friends find themselves running so to not be caught and be forced to fight for Government or rebels. He becomes one of many child soldiers and is torn between the family he lost and the new one he becomes part of. His story is of perseverance and determination because many pieces fall into place for him to end up in America and becomes a spokesman and advocate for piece. Not a book for young elementary but a chapter book for MIDDLE
  • (4/5)
    A horrific tale of the indoctrination and rehab of a child soldier in Sierra Leone. Sometimes Ishmael seems to be like a "Forrest Gump" character; that is, the teenager always seems to be in the the wrong (or most historically significant place) place at the wrong (or most historically significant) time. The time he rounds the hill to finally greet his parents only to have a rebel attack occur at that very moment - very dramatic. There's apparently some controversy about this memoir, focused mostly on the very long stint as a soldier (accusations from reporting staff of The Australian). Still, I'm sure some of this account is very true, and it is very disturbing story.
  • (5/5)
    Ishmael Beah leaves his village in Sierra Leonne one day for a short trip with friends to practice dancing. Fortunately, he happens to put on all of his 3 sets of clothes, because while he is gone, rebels destroy his village. In the wake of this brutal civil war, he experiences the loss of family, the horror of violence all around, being on the run for his life ,lost in jungles and caught in the middle of rebel fighters and the goverment army. In all of this tragedy though, hope is not lost. A shocking, true story that you won't want to put down, this 228 page book is appropriate for adults and teens.
  • (4/5)
    A well-told account of a brutal childhood. The language is plain but fluid, overall an "easy" read in terms of writing style and a very hard read in terms of content.
  • (5/5)
    Horrible and wonderful at the same. Wonderful in the telling, horrific in the content. War is hell. No one should have to go through that, or see the brutality of it, let alone a child. I'm happy he lived through it, and is a better man for it.
  • (5/5)
    This book was heartbreaking but amazing. In it Ishmael Beah documents some of his struggles as he tries to survive the civil war in Sierra Leone. He talks about his time running from the war, as a child soldier, his rehabilitation and his exodus out of his homeland. The book did not end the way I have come to expect from books, many things were left up in the air, but I think it was fitting ending for what he had experienced.
  • (5/5)
    Really anything that I could write here would be insufficient, so I just have to say - READ THIS BOOK. It's amazing and heartbreaking and inspiring all at once. The only thing I would have liked to read in this book is how the author made it from Guinea to the United States at the end. Maybe he'll write another memoir about that step of his life later on? Otherwise - perfection.
  • (5/5)
    So many horrific atrocities involving children that I kept rechecking the cover desperately hoping to see it was really a novel. Not an enjoyable read, but a very important one.
  • (2/5)
    My son had to read this for eighth grade, so I did too. Ugh.