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More All-of-a-Kind Family

More All-of-a-Kind Family

Написано Sydney Taylor

Озвучено Suzanne Toren


More All-of-a-Kind Family

Написано Sydney Taylor

Озвучено Suzanne Toren

оценки:
4.5/5 (51 оценки)
Длина:
3 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 1982
ISBN:
9781593163648
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

In the third book of Sydney Taylor’s classic children’s series, Ella finds a boyfriend and Henny disagrees with Papa over her curfew. Thus continues the tale of a Jewish family of five sisters—Ella, Henny, Sarah, Charlotte and Gertie—living at the turn of the century in New York’s Lower East Side. Entertaining and educational, this book brings to life the joys and fears of that time and place.
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 1982
ISBN:
9781593163648
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе


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Что люди думают о More All-of-a-Kind Family

4.6
51 оценки / 26 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    A sweet book about a Jewish family living in the Lower East Side in the early 20th century. From what I read online, this seems to be the first book about a Jewish family written for a mainstream audience. I absolutely love how this book casually demonstrates the way in which different cultures can coexist peacefully together.

    I pre-read this for my daughter, who is an advanced reader. It put me in mind of the Little House on the Prairie series, and is a great selection for sensitive, gifted readers who might not be ready for some of the material in other books on this reading level (such as Harry Potter).
  • (4/5)
    In 1912, on the East Side of New York City, lives a Jewish family of a mother, a father, and five girls: Ella (the grown-up one), Henny (the troublemaker), Sarah (the logical one), Charlotte (the dreamer), and Gertie (the baby). The girls love candy, and books, and although they don't have much money they can always find ways to entertain each other. This is the first in a series of really cute books that I read when I was little. The girls are all different and are really fun, and it's a great introduction to Jewish customs. Several Jewish holidays are described throughout the book, from the perspective of the extremely excited little girls. I think these appealed to me more than the Little House books and Anne of Green Gables books when I was a kid, because these girls lived in a city, like I did. I enjoyed this trip down memory lane, although there is not much more to appreciate here as an adult than as a kid.
  • (4/5)
    I think that this book is perfect for a fourth grader. It leads the reader on a journey through the holidays of the Jewish year as experienced by five sisters living on the lower east side of Manhattan in 1912 with their hard working father who has a rag and junk business and their loving and fair mother. There is a visit to Coney Island and Playland, the building of a succos house, celebration of Purim. The descriptions of the Jewish holidays are folded into the day to day lives of the children who operate as a tightly knit group.

    Very charming, with a hint of romance between the Gentile librarian and fellow junkman Charlie.
  • (5/5)
    Oh my goodness. I loved this so much. I wish that I had read it as a child so that I could have had years of rereading it. The story of these five sisters is so charming and it really does make you want to be one of them.
  • (5/5)
    A heart-warming, gently humorous and informative family story, my one main regret is that I only recently discovered Sydney Taylor's All-of-a-Kind Family (I would have loved this delightful story as a child, or a teenager, and am now keener than ever to read the rest of the series, but the sequels are, unfortunately, not nearly as readily available as the first book of the series).Wonderful, delightful episodes show the joys, the struggles and the close family and neighbourhood ties of a Jewish-American family in early 20th century New York City. I love how the different Jewish holidays, how Jewish cultural and religious traditions are depicted and shown throughout the story, informatively, but with no hint of didacticism. And I especially appreciate how the all-of-a-kind family also shares its traditions with friends who are not Jewish (specifically Charlie and the Library Lady, who actually end up rekindling, rediscovering their romance, which had been thwarted by Charlie's bigoted and judgmental parents). In today's world, where multiculturalism, where different cultures are again so often under attack and scrutiny, All-of-a-Kind Family clearly and lovingly demonstrates that different cultures can not only exist and peacefully coexist in a country, in a city, in a neighbourhood, but that these different cultures can and should be shared, that sharing one's cultural heritage leads to increased tolerance and understanding (and that even though we might have different cultural and religious traditions, we are basically all quite similar in many ways). Recommended for anyone (both children and adults) who enjoys warm family tales, as well as anyone interested in learning about Jewish-American culture and traditions.
  • (3/5)
    Listened to Listen and Live eaudio edition narrated by Suzanne Toren over the course of a month or so. This worked really well for a now and then listen because it's very episodic. Would be a great recommendation for families looking for gentle reads. I really enjoyed learning about how the family celebrated Jewish holidays.
  • (2/5)
    Summary:This book is about a mom and a dad and 5 step daughters. it was set in New York City around 1900. this book is about all the adventures the girls havePersonal Reaction:I didnt really like this book, it was kinda boring.classroom extention:1. Shows children what it was like in the 19002. shows children that all kids go through stuff.
  • (3/5)
    This book is the first in a series about 5 poor little Jewish sisters living with their loving parents in New York City prior to WWI. It is very much a gentle middle grade story, told episodically with only the slenderest of threads keeping it from being related short stories. There is a charm to the novel but it is one that is hard for an adult who doesn't already have fond reading memories of it to pick up and enjoy thoroughly. The historical situation is interesting and the little girls are lovely. The easy introduction of Judaism was natural and likely somewhat exotic when it was published. It seems to me that our world and our experiences are a bit more global now than they were and so it loses a bit of the novelty factor, at least for me and for my non-Jewish but always inquisitive children. Children who enjoy reading about their counterparts in the past will enjoy this series of vignettes and will probably get some good imagination exercising in as they put themselves in the place of these sweet, sunny little girls. Adults may find the excessive cheer and always happy outcomes a bit much but it will appeal to them too if they want an hour or so of sheer, unsullied escapism.
  • (4/5)
    Favorite part: New baby comes after five girls and it is a boy. "Now we're not all-of-a-kind any more," one of the sisters says. Mom: "Yes, we are. We all love each other and care about each other. We're still all-of-a-kind."
  • (2/5)
    A memorable story, strong in period details about Jewish family life. Excellent read aloud for any middle grades class room.
  • (4/5)
    All-of-a-Kind-Family is a nice look at life in turn-of-the-century New York, the life of an immigrant family, and the Jewish customs and culture. It is very fun to peek into the difference in lifestyle that this book presents. My only complaint is that it is indeed highly episodic: each chapter holds little connection with the one before or following. It takes a little while to get into the mode of how it is written, but is an enjoyable book none-the-less.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this entire series as a child. This, the first one, is more organized by the Jewish holidays as the family goes through their year. The five little girls, growing up in New York City during the early 1900s, learn about their faith and their culture. The reader learns about the world they live in as they explore their neighborhood market for Shabbat, go to the library, head to Coney Island(complete with sideshow), get scarlet fever, and finally learn about having a little brother.
  • (4/5)
    This is a sweet book with sweet themes. Perfect for a young reader who is able to read chapter books, but who is not yet ready for the darker themes of many children's books.
  • (4/5)
    These books are nostalgic reminders of how I learned the modern ways of celebrating Jewish holidays a a young girl. These remain beautiful stories of sisterhood and compassionate parenting.Plus, who could forget their Italian friend Guido?
  • (5/5)
    Lovely family story about a family of girls living in New York. I would have loved this as a child.
  • (4/5)
    Sydney Taylor's classic book for middle readers is set in the Lower East Side of New York City and depicts the life of a traditional Jewish family in the early 20th century. All-of-A-Kind Family is the first in a series of novels about the lively family and is a sweet, charming read. The story takes the reader through most of year and involves not just the family but their friends and acquaintances, too. The book opens with a chapter about going to the library, and the children's librarian (or "library lady," as the girls like to call her) is a gentle, recurring presence. The children's adventures include a trip to the market, scarlet fever and an outing to Coney Island, where one of the girls gets temporarily, and happily, lost. Meanwhile the story meanders through a year of Jewish holidays and teaches the reader a little about each one. I particularly enjoyed the chapter on Shabbat and how Taylor contrasts the hubbub of shopping and preparations with the simple serenity of the day itself. The family relationships struck me as very true and believable- for example, Papa's ambivalence regarding the present the girls get for his birthday and his quick turnaround struck me as realistic and human. I can imagine any parent reacting the way he did initially and then rallying in the end. I appreciate Taylor's honesty about her characters throughout the book, too. It's a great book for anyone and I'm looking forward to reading the rest of the series and sharing in the further adventures of this fun, busy family.
  • (5/5)
    My mom introduced me to this book when I was 8; she read it herself at the same age! I love all of these books about a loving Jewish family. I learned a lot about the religion and I will never get tired of reading them! I also love the companion books!
  • (5/5)
    This is the first in a wonderful series of books. I read this as a child, and now my son is enjoying it. It is a very wholesome book about a Jewish family, which was an unusual subject for the time period in which it was written. A great starting point for talking about the early 1900's, as well as Judaism.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book so much, an amazing and funny story and lovely charecters my favruite story in the world!!!☺☺❤❤???
  • (4/5)
    This is an interesting book to learn the history of the Jews on the Lower East Side in the early 20th century. The ideas are very sexist, but it provides for good discussions with grandchildren. I loved this book as a child.
  • (5/5)
    The All-of-a-Kind Family return in this second delightful tale - and yes, despite the effort of some to re-order these by chronology, More All-of-a-Kind Family is the second book! - and their adventures here are more fun, more amusing, more poignant, and more heartwarming than in their first, the eponymous All-of-a-Kind Family! The book opens with the marvelous "Lena the Greena" chapter, which introduces the titular Lena who, in an act of bravery, saves Little Charlie, who has wandered into the street, right into the path of an oncoming carriage. From this dramatic beginning, the narrative moves on, once again chronicling matters large and small in the life of this loving, close-knit Jewish family living on the Lower East Side of New York City during the early years of the twentieth century. Here we see eldest daughter Ella experiencing her very first crush (begun at the library, of course!), we witness fun-loving Henny getting into quite a scrape (for which her friend Fanny pays the price!), and we follow along as youngest daughter Gertie finally learns to tell time. We have the amusement of baby Charlie's chapter, in which he toddles up and down the stairs until he finally gets what he wants: namely, his mother to smile at him. But then we have the heartbreak of the chapters in which Lena becomes ill, and her marriage to Uncle Hyman is called off. The book closes with a momentous change, as the family prepare to move away from the crowded Lower East Side, to the leafy uptown Bronx...I adore all of the books about the All-of-a-Kind family, but this may be my very favorite. There is a deepening of feeling in More All-of-a-Kind Family that is immensely moving, a sense that the people being depicted are real, walking right out of the 1910s, across the pages of the book, and into my heart. The romantic in me loved the story-line involving Charlie and the Library Lady in the first entry in the series, but the relationship between Uncle Hyman and Lena here is so much more real to me, so much more precious. I get teary EVERY SINGLE TIME I read the exchange between Mama and Lena at the house in Far Rockaway, in which Mama attempts to reason with a hurting and very stubborn Lena. I can still recall the revelation it was to me, reading this for the first time as a young girl, that one could act with the conviction of doing right, of sparing others, but really be motivated by a certain kind of thoughtless self-involvement. I feel proud EVERY SINGLE TIME I read Papa's little speech at the end of the book, in which he tells his girls that America is a truly wonderful country, where everyone has the chance to better themselves. Then I get teary again (EVERY SINGLE TIME) when he maintains that they, the All-of-a-Kind Family, have never been poor, because they have had each other. Although all the books are marvelous, and although I tend to reread the first book most often, this second installment is the absolute best in my opinion - a masterpiece of children's literature! Recommended to everyone who reads, with the caveat that they should read All-of-a-Kind Family first.
  • (5/5)
    These books were my childhood. <3
  • (5/5)
    I am thoroughly enjoying these books. I think that I read only the first book as a kid, and now I’ve just read book 3 and I plan to read book 4 soon. For now I’m skipping 2 and 5, though I might go back and read book 2 at some point.I love this family. I especially loved Sarah in the first book, and in this book I loved Sarah and Ella, and Charlotte too, and Mama and Papa of course, as well as assorted other relatives, friends, and neighbors.The experience of Jewish culture and life in NYC’s lower east side of nearly 100 years ago is lovingly captured. In my opinion, this is the best kind of historical fiction, a wonderful story with interesting characters (based on the author’s family) and getting a feeling for how they lived in another place & time.Even though this book works fine for a standalone book, I really feel that the first book should be read first. A lot of intro material is left out, including the ages of the daughters.This book would make for a perfect family read aloud book. Each chapter manages to stand on its own, telling its own story. It’s a perfect book for a chapter a night bedtime reading. Each chapter is a gem. If I’d read this at ages 8-10, I think I would have loved the telling time clock chapter the best; I’d have felt superior since I learned to tell time as soon as I turned 5, at the beginning of kindergarten, but I know many students in my 3rd grade class still didn’t have that ability. My borrowed library copy has a photo of Sydney Taylor. I love how the pictures of Sarah in the book look a bit like her. The illustrations are delightful and capture scenes right out of the story.Fabulous book and series! I can’t wait to get to book 4; it’s already on reserve at the library. I can tell there are going to be some major changes for the family and I’m eager to read about what happens in their lives.
  • (5/5)
    Oh, now this one stands up to the re-read. Lovely, lovely book. Evocative of the Lower East Side, poised before the First World War. The family is doing better financially, and there's The Wedding to look forward to and be part of.

    My favorite bit in this book is when Charlie goes downstairs to solemnly tell the shopkeeper, "My mama don't smile on me."

    This one gets tucked back on the shelf for certain.
  • (5/5)
    This series of books makes a great addition to a young person’s book collection. Written in the 1950’s, it chronicles the lives of five young Jewish girls living New York City during the early 1900’s. It ties together the themes of immigrants, Judaism, and American patriotism in a way that few books for young readers can. These stories could be criticized for romanticizing or trivializing the struggles of Jewish immigrants. My answer to this argument is that these books were written for young independent readers. Concepts presented in books for this age group must be enjoyable and interesting so that comprehension is easily achieved and the student experiences that boost in self-esteem that comes from finishing a book! This series is great for the young reader because they are just wholesome, happy reads. They describe the antics of a group of sisters who usually get along, sometimes fight, and sometimes disobey their parents. These books also give the young reader an opportunity to learn about some Jewish traditions right along with the young characters in the story. Library Implications: These books bring forth so many different opportunities for learning through print; it is hard to limit the options listed here. The lives of immigrants in New York could be studied, focusing research perhaps on one tenement community. The concept of Jewish traditions and holidays can be explored, using technology to watch video clips of celebrations very different from American customs. American history in the early 1900’s could also be a topic of study. These stories take place right before the start of World War 1, so older students could explore the causes of the war and how if effected immigrant families.
  • (5/5)
    This series of stories is deceptively simple. It seems to be (and is) a look at the daily life of Jewish children in New York City tenements at the turn of the last century. Without a deep philosophical message, the story line still seems to run a little deeper than the usual children's book. For one thing, we learn a lot about Jewish holidays and customs. When the author explains the story behind a holiday, she rarely takes more than a paragraph, but that is all a child needs to understand. The relationship between the sisters (and their new little brother) is strong and loving without being sickly sweet and perfect. A lovely slice-of-life that I enjoyed a lot.