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Emotional Intelligence: What Makes a Leader?

Emotional Intelligence: What Makes a Leader?

Написано Daniel Goleman

Озвучено Deaver Brown


Emotional Intelligence: What Makes a Leader?

Написано Daniel Goleman

Озвучено Deaver Brown

оценки:
4/5 (258 оценки)
Длина:
51 минута
Издано:
5 окт. 2010 г.
ISBN:
9781614960423
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Emotional Intelligence - What Makes a Leader?

Goleman was the first to identify emotional intelligence as a critical factor in leadership performance and success. He wrote about this succinctly in his best selling book, Emotional Intelligence. His Harvard Business Review (HBR) article is the first identifying and analyzing specifically how emotional intelligence is a critical factor in management success and CEO performance.

This audio book provides a core summary of his best seller, as well as focusing on his insights about the importance of a keen emotional intelligence for management and CEO performance.

Goleman identifies and discusses in details the five critical components of emotional intelligence (ei): self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills. Goleman analyzes how executives with strong ei skills make the best managers and CEOs. Coleman provides numerous approaches throughout the audio book about how to improve the reader’s ei.

Keywords: Daniel Goleman, HBR, Harvard, Harvard Business School, HBS, emotional intelligence, self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, social skills, talents, skills, CEO, executive, manager.
Издано:
5 окт. 2010 г.
ISBN:
9781614960423
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

Daniel Goleman, a former science journalist for the New York Times, is the author of thirteen books and lectures frequently to professional groups and business audiences and on college campuses. He cofounded the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning at the Yale University Child Studies Center (now at the University of Illinois, at Chicago).


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Что люди думают о Emotional Intelligence

4.0
258 оценки / 45 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    This book is concisely written and hits some very good points on the subject of emotional intelligence. The author reminds us that learning to manage our emotional intelligence is an ongoing, time consuming, rewarding process. ?Learning from your wins and failures is a smart way to manage your life? is such an important point when learning to balance logic and emotion. Practice is key, like any other thing in life. I really liked the real world examples used to highlight the major topics. Using being upset over the stress of traffic is a wonderful example of how our emotional intelligence can guide us through an upset that really doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things. Overall, this book was well written and provided sensible, practical information regarding emotional intelligence.
  • (2/5)
    Most of the information in the book was somewhat trivial - or maybe it was made to seem trivial by excessive repetition? I also found the book a bit dully written, partly because of the repetition but also its style, and it didn't quite capture me. It was difficult to relate to many of the examples as they were so extreme (murders/killings, e.g. school shooters) and although it was highlighted that there is no need for a tragedy to leave a person emotionally disabled, I was left wondering couldn't the point be made with seemingly normal people. This would have added some complexity to the subject as well and made it more interesting. With all the murdering going on, it almost seemed as if the author wanted to shock people. The problem was highlighted with statistics on teen pregnancies and depression. Yes, that is the obvious result from emotional detachment but there was nothing (or too little) on why is this problem getting more serious now. What is the effect of wars on the people? Is it like we live in constant war and the only way to survive is to shut down emotionally and, as a consequence, this emotionlessness is passed down to our children and grandchildren? Or is it the increased sense of individualism all over the western society? There were, however, some parts that were thought provoking and provided insight to my own life and experience. I still believe that there are better books on the subject (even when I haven't read except this one).
  • (4/5)
    Even though this book came out in 1995, it's still pretty relevant. What would be interesting if the author wrote an updated version of this, using all the new data from neuroscience research, biology, psychology, and so on, to reinforce what he talked about in the original. The most interesting part of the book, I thought, was the documented work with emotional intelligence and children, something that I believe is still very relevant today. Children from certain school were taught to observe their emotions and to adjust them according to their situation. One example was a disagreement between to boys over a project they were working on in class, and the boy that was the most angry was taken aside to settle his mind and observe his emotions. He was guided to take the perspective of his project partner, to try and see things from his point-of-view, while examining his own emotions as to why he reacted the way he did. This, I believe, is an essential skill that all humans need to be taught, especially from a young age. Considering all the anger, confusion, hatred, and stress in the world (especially in the Western cultures), emotional intelligence needs to be taught to all in order to achieve a more balanced world.Though a bit outdated with many other books by other experts in psychology, sociology, neuroscience, etc., talking about this and many other, more updated, aspects of the human mind, this should still be read if you are at all interested in E.Q. and/or psychology.
  • (5/5)
    Read a very long time ago, so not qualified to write the review now, but a formative book, with great insights.
  • (4/5)
    exploration of 5 domains; Self-awarenessManaging EmotionsSelf-MotivationEmpathyHandling Relationships
  • (4/5)
    Worth reading!
  • (5/5)
    This was awesome. It is refreshing to here teaching and insight on being effective in the work place... and home. Thanks for your research and publishing of this book.
  • (3/5)
    I think the content is good, but it seems the narrator was reading from a prepared script or teleprompter.
  • (2/5)
    Good book. Hesitant narrator. Terrible audio. Read the book, don't waste your time listening to this audiobook.
  • (3/5)
    interested in the content. should have used better narration. felt like a bland lecture
  • (4/5)
    Basic but interesting/thought provoking. Definitely not a bad quick listen.
  • (4/5)
    Extremely brief but a great introduction into what Emotional Intelligence is and how to go about identifying it
  • (3/5)
    The title should mention it is a summary
    Good book
  • (3/5)
    I got a bit bored even though the subject was interesting. Not sure why.
  • (4/5)
    The five components of emotional intelligence and its importance for leaders,
  • (1/5)
    It was very poorly produced and it was difficult to follow the reader.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent audiobook、Highly recommended, easy to understand to non technical audiences
  • (2/5)
    The book was probably amazing, but the narrator was very amateurish. You can hear a computer click when he flips a page he read, you can hear when a passage bores him and in general the narrator is so present that he himself became the story and the book was presented so badly that I struggled to focus on it - nor do I remember its content as well as the other books I've recently heard.
    In all fairness though, once you accepted that this is how this amazing book is narrated, it starts being amusing imagining what's going on in the mind of the narrator that lead to him presenting this passage in one way and this in another or why he emphasized this part of it and not another.
  • (4/5)
    I loved how concise and straight to the point it is. My favorite part was the discussion of self regulating. I realized there’s a difference between self reflecting and self regulating and how both are important. The speaker broke it down in simple terms like self regulating is an inner conversation. Simply an amazing audio book.
  • (5/5)
    Nice book on भावनात्मक बौद्धिकता it teaches स्व अनुशासन, स्व नियंत्रण, स्व नियमन, स्व सजगता, स्व प्रबंधन। feel free for making hindi audiobook @chanchalbittuprashant@gmail.com. charges 10$ per hour Audiobook
  • (5/5)
    The exposure to the 5 components of Emotional Intelligence.
  • (2/5)
    This book was recommended reading for a 2012 management program for which I was selected. I admit up front that I typically would not read it, but I thought I'd give it a shot and tried to keep an open mind. If "tried" foreshadows my conclusions...well, I tried.

    Three quarters bio-anatomy (quite a number of surveys/studies cited, "suggesting" correlation), one sixth bold statements and conclusions from those surveys, leaving one twelfth that might have value in the workplace. That is, after all, the reason the subject was recommended. Actually, one twelfth is a bit generous (being 25 pages.) I flagged less than 20 to pull tidbits from. Opinion, yes, but this is my "review", thus my opinion counts.

    I read this so that I might add to my leadership toolbox. Instead, I came away with a lesser impression of Goleman's position: "See? Biology supports this. I'm right, even if I can't make my case very convincing to people who don't think like me." Not to say that someone more emotionally attuned wouldn't buy into the entire theory, but I had too hard a time shaking off the questions I couldn't quite form in my head as I read the book. I felt there were too many forced conclusions. I don't fault Goleman for corralling the research supporting his model, but I wonder if he could look at the data and come up with something else, or if his bias drove him to seek out the studies that seemed to support his conclusions.?

    In short, the book did little to explain to me the subtitle "Why it can matter more than IQ" in - and I'll take the blame for this - terms I could accept, and worse, did a poor sell of the cover (10th anniversary edition) superlative "The groundbreaking book that redefined what it means to be smart."

    Why is the business world so susceptible to faddish theories? Demings's Total Quality Managment...Six Sigma...life coaching...emotional intelligence. In a oddly serendipitous infrequent check on my LinkedIn page as I read this book, I noticed someone suggested as someone I might know was a "Certified Emotional Intelligence Consultant." Apparently, I am way behind the curve on this one. And like most things ignored, now that I am aware of ?emotional intelligence (EQ), I'm sure I'll see more of it.

    Too little of the book was spent on anything practical and too much seemed to be spent on justifying the conclusions. Part Men Are From Mars..., part take-your-pick of self-help tracts, part disconnected psycho-studies, it seemed to me that Goleman could see only his conclusion from any scenario presented. "The single most important element in group intelligence, it turns out, is not the average IQ in the academic sense, but rather in terms of emotional intelligence." The "single most"? "it turns out"? Very definite, yet not very rigorous, nor conclusive. But while I admit not having the skills/background to point out where Goleman may be wrong, his absolute pronouncements registered discordant with me. How can you state so conclusively that what separates achieves is not their IQ (which Goleman rightly pegs as a measure of potential academic success, not as being "intelligent") but their EQ? Reaching.

    "There is an old-fashioned word for the body of skills that emotional intelligence represents: character."

    "old-fashioned"? Not in my book. If "character" fits, why invent a new term?

    Lumping together common sense concepts such as cooperation and workplace harmony and rebranding them as "emotional intelligence" is brilliant. And a tad saccharine. Disclosing ?my aversion to diet sweeteners, you can see my reaction to this book. But I can appreciate those who can sell this serpentine lubricant - until the next fad.?
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This book is concisely written and hits some very good points on the subject of emotional intelligence. The author reminds us that learning to manage our emotional intelligence is an ongoing, time consuming, rewarding process. ?Learning from your wins and failures is a smart way to manage your life? is such an important point when learning to balance logic and emotion. Practice is key, like any other thing in life. I really liked the real world examples used to highlight the major topics. Using being upset over the stress of traffic is a wonderful example of how our emotional intelligence can guide us through an upset that really doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things. Overall, this book was well written and provided sensible, practical information regarding emotional intelligence.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I decided to read this book after it had been recommended to me by my boss. He has been trying to increase his own "EQ" to improve his performance as a manager and local business owner. I generally don't read a lot of non-fiction, so this book took me a bit longer to read than I had planned. It wasn't that it was a difficult read, but there were some parts that were very information dense. I also felt like some parts got a bit repetitive, and I tended to just put the book down and not pick it up again for a day when this happened. Despite all this, I think the book was easy to read in that the language was approachable. Granted, I do have a strong science background, but I don't think it would be too hard to follow even if you don't have a masters in biology. I rated this book 4 out of 5 stars because above all, I found the topic very interesting and could see myself rereading this book.The book is divided into 5 parts: an introduction to emotions and the brain, an introduction to emotional intelligence, personal applications of emotional intelligence, interpersonal applications of emotional intelligence, and teaching emotional intelligence. The first part has a large focus on neuroscience and definitions of emotions. The second, third and fourth parts are the real meat of the book where you get into what emotional intelligence is and how it can be applied and beneficial to someone through out their lives and in their various relationships. The final part is mainly just prose advocating for emotional intelligence education becoming a larger part of our education system.The edition that I was reading was the tenth anniversary edition, published in 2005. The benefit of this was that the introduction was able to give some perspective on how the book has effected change since it's original publication. Also, there is a resources section in the back that has information on ways to educate yourself more about emotional intelligence.This is not a book about how to increase your emotional intelligence, it is an introductory text about what emotional intelligence is and its history. It does have some advice on how to be more emotionally intelligent, but it is not an educational text or self-help/instructional text by any means. The main detraction for me in this book was that the author does spend a lot of time focusing on how important emotional intelligence is in child development and in child education. This can get a bit tedious if you don't have kids or just aren't that interested in child development. Not to say that I'm opposed to learning about child development and parenting techniques, but as a childless adult, I found it wasn't relevant to me other than being interesting to know.As previously mentioned, overall I enjoyed this book and found the topic very interesting. I would definitely recommend this book.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    If this book was taught in high school as part of mandatory curriculum perhaps humanity would be more successful as a whole. Goleman brilliantly explores why emotional intelligence far surpasses IQ in determining how people will fare in work and in personal relationships. He also draws insightful correlations between our emotional failings in these areas and health. A must read for every person on Earth!
  • (4/5)
    Pretty good. A little incomplete, because so much research has been done since, but more careful, plausible, and ultimately 'right' than the other related books I've been reading recently. I particularly appreciate the many times he says probably" and "might" and "often" - even the subtitle has the word "can" in it. And not an arrogant, self-centered "we" in the book - yay!

    Btw, it's not a self-help book. And it's dense only if you don't have experience reading other popular science books. It's good science, but written for laymen. It is a little dry, especially compared to some of the modern pop-psych books.

    There is one bit that examines psychopaths that might disturb people coping with autism - but he does make a note that not all people with the particular empathic deficit will be criminal. I imagine the problem is simply that autism was not well-known at the time. I have picked up another, more recent book, by the author at the library because 'autism' is listed multiply in the index and I'll be looking at that next.

    I believe that we've (American parents, teachers, cops, & doctors) learned a lot about how important empathy and coping skills and anger management techniques, etc., are since this book came out. I do have hope for us.

    I don't see the emotional/ social skills curricula he describes being added to most schools, despite the fact that students trained in emotional wisdom do better academically, though. I believe, as I'd be willing to bet most voters do, that it's still the job of the parent, the child's first teacher, to provide a child with a healthy mental foundation. Unfortunately not all children get this kind of nourishment, but for now I think we'll have to be satisfied that schools are at least aware of Goleman's advice, even if they can't implement it as thoroughly as he and I would like.

    Recommended if you're interested - don't bother if you're not. Ok."
  • (5/5)
    Excellent analysis and presentation on why emotional intelligence matters and how to improve it. Everyone. Read.
  • (2/5)
    Halfway through, but make that another Summer read ... finished it!!! It was deep, hard read, way too scientific; I expected something more practical ....
  • (4/5)
    Short summary, not the full book
  • (5/5)
    good