Наслаждайтесь миллионами электронных книг, аудиокниг, журналов и других видов контента

Только $11.99 в месяц после пробной версии. Можно отменить в любое время.

Time and Again

Time and Again

Написано Jack Finney

Озвучено Paul Hecht


Time and Again

Написано Jack Finney

Озвучено Paul Hecht

оценки:
4/5 (104 оценки)
Длина:
17 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
8 мар. 2011 г.
ISBN:
9781442342859
Формат:

Описание

Finally on audio -- one of the most beloved tales of our time!

Science fiction, mystery, a passionate love story, and a detailed history of Old New York blend together in Jack Finney's spellbinding story of a young man enlisted in a secret Government experiment.

Transported from the mid-twentieth century to New York City in the year 1882, Si Morley walks the fashionable "Ladies' Mile" of Broadway, is enchanted by the jingling sleigh bells in Central Park, and solves a 20th-century mystery by discovering its 19th-century roots. Falling in love with a beautiful young woman, he ultimately finds himself forced to choose between his lives in the present and the past.

A story that will remain in the listener's memory, Time and Again is a remarkable blending of the troubled present and a nostalgic past, made vivid and extraordinarily moving by the images of a time that was...and perhaps still is.
Издатель:
Издано:
8 мар. 2011 г.
ISBN:
9781442342859
Формат:

Об авторе

Jack Finney (1911–1995) was the author of the much-loved and critically acclaimed novel Time and Again, as well as its sequel, From Time to Time. Best known for his thrillers and science fiction, a number of his books—including Invasion of the Body Snatchers—have been made into movies.


Связано с Time and Again

Похожие Аудиокниги

Похожие статьи


Обзоры

Что люди думают о Time and Again

4.2
104 оценки / 79 Обзоры
Ваше мнение?
Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд

Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    Fantastic ending. Starts out a bit slow and picks up steam throughout. The leap of imagination for time travel is rather reasonable. Very enjoyable read.
  • (5/5)
    Read this a long time ago. A wonderful story. Enjoyed it even more this time.
  • (4/5)
    Fascinating if you are interested in New York City in the 1880's. Too much description for me and not enough story line. If you can make it past the first three quarters of the book, then the story line picks up and the descriptions drop off.
  • (4/5)
    TIME AND AGAIN has been touted as the time travel novel to read. While I found a lot to like in it, and I thought it was compelling historical fiction, I did not ultimately think it was a great book about time travel. Si is working an unfulfilling job at an advertising agency in New York City when he receives an offer to join a mysterious government project. After that attention-grabbing hook, though, the story proceeds very slowly. It takes so long to explain the time travel process that when it finally is revealed, it seems laughably simple and somewhat absurd, as if Si is merely going to wish himself into the past. He does manage to travel to 1880s New York, which Finney describes in great and convincing detail. These facts of ordinary life in a different age are interesting, but only to a point (probably more so for those who are very familiar with New York City). They also slow the story down to a crawl. I particularly didn't care for Finney's romanticization of the past, in the voice of his main character, toward the end of the novel. Every time has committed its own crimes against humanity. The late 1800s were certainly no golden age, when you consider child labor, the unequal status of minorities and women, and the extreme poverty of some with no social safety net -- a facet of the time that Finney explores in the novel. In many ways, the 1970s are immeasurably better, so it seems naive to presume that the people of the earlier age were somehow more "real" or "alive." This is a personal bugaboo, but it bothered me bothered me quite a bit when I was reading the novel.When Finney does finally get around to the meat of his story, things get very exciting very quickly. There's a devastating fire, a police chase, a sweet romance, a conspiracy, a mystery to be solved and, of course, leaps about in time. I just wish those events had made up more of the meat of the novel.
  • (5/5)
    Mr favorite New York City novel. I always think of it when walking in Central Park after a fresh snowfall, particularly if there's a horse clip-clopping along the park drive drawing a carriage.
  • (5/5)
    Classic time travel story that evokes the era with drawings and photos so that its real. The time travel is based on the notion of a gestalt switch of seeing/feeling the era. Exploration is corrupted by a Political attempt to manipulate the past to suit USA interests(so what's new!) This is stopped but at a cost. One of the most memorable SF books read and as far as techie action as you can get
  • (4/5)
    Time travel back to 1882. Good read.
  • (4/5)
    Truly a classic. The only thing holding this book back from full 5-star glory is a certain leisureliness in the tale-telling, which, to a certain extent, might be justified by its vision of the past. What I particularly applaud, though, is Finney's almost cavalier treatment of the physics of time travel.
  • (4/5)
    This story was published in 1970 and feels about that old in writing style. This could almost have been written yesterday however. Finney is famous for writing this novel as well as the earlier "Invasion of the Body Snatchers". This is nominally a science fiction novel. The old fashioned term "scientific romance" works better for me. There's a time travel trick in here. A trick kinda like the film "Somewhere In Time". Otherwise this is more of an historical fiction piece of New York in 1882 as well as a bit of the author's present of 1969-1970. So if you want a feel for New York, here it is. In fact this is a bit of a love affair with 1882 New York, all pretty at first and then the reality smacks you hard.I had a little trouble buying into the premise, and the story I thought rather slow at first, but once the story got going I was caught up in it. By the time I was about a quarter way through I realized I was really enjoying it and it just got better. Something of a mystery and romance. Some nice twists and turns. There are also a number of illustrations which I thought added greatly to the adventure in time. Towards the end the story became very exciting and a real page-turner.There is a sequel to this which I will read very soon.Recommended
  • (4/5)
    This was a really fun read, deserving of it's status as a classic. While clearly a product of its time with sexism and dated references, there was still something quite fun reading a novel about time travel contrasting the 1970s with the 1880s, from my pov in 2015. My husband laughe out loud when I read him the description of the miraculous tv you could turn on using KNOBS! And it had SIX channels! . The end was a nice twist too.
  • (2/5)
    A strange cross between a secret-govt.-project time-travel sci-fi novel, a period mystery and a 19th-century NYC nostalgia-fest.
    Liberally illustrated with period drawings and photographs that purport to be by the main character (although they obviously aren't) - but it's an original and interesting aspect.
    This novel is notable for being by the guy who wrote Invasion of the Body Snatchers.
    As is the case with most time-travel stories, the logic of the time-travel concept doesn't really hold up - you need a good suspension of disbelief - but the main focus of the book is a joy and appreciation for the details of New York City life in the 1880's - and the mystery and the romance do hold up their end as far as interest...
    I don't know if I'd call it a 'masterwork', but it was interesting to read...
  • (3/5)
    For some reason, I found this book really disappointing. I can't quite put my finger on why I didn't enjoy it: perhaps I was just in the wrong mood for it. The whole book was rather tedious, with long detailed descriptions of NYC in the 1880s, and as much as these descriptions should have been fascinating, they just weren't. The narrator kept talking about how the experience of time travel was so amazing that he couldn't express it, so the whole book comes across as a joke that ends with "I guess you had to be there to think it was funny." There were some great plot twists in the last 2 pages (literally!), but I didn't think it was worth reading the whole book just for that.Other reviewers have complained about the fact that the book is dated, and I agree: it's not yet dated enough to be entertainingly old-fashioned (like H.G. Wells), but it is dated enough for some aspects to be annoying: the treatment of women in particular. Perhaps this is also why I couldn't enjoy the book: it was just an outdated aesthetic.The book is illustrated, but the quality of the reproductions in the book is so bad that it might as well not be. Besides, if a picture is worth a thousand words, including the illustrations should have enabled the author to keep the book much much shorter.
  • (3/5)
    Slow read. Good story but too much prose.
  • (5/5)
    Time travel and Science Fiction are really not my cup of tea, but I have to admit I really enjoyed this book. I loved the look at New York in days gone bye!
  • (5/5)
    My oldest son's dad, who was a bookstore owner, loved this book beyond any other and used to stock it in great stacks in the 70's. I think he personally put it into the hands of just about every customer we had.
    And when our son grew up, it was one of his favorites as well.
    It is charming, romantic, and tender. And it has pictures. What more could you desire?
  • (4/5)
    Time travel through self-hypnosis is definitely one of the most creative methods I've ever read about, and definitely one of the more bizarre. The idea is that if you are able to find a place that is virtually identical to what it was (or will be) in another time, you can hypnotize yourself into actually transporting to that other time. Not everyone can do it. But if you're good enough at it, you can apparently take someone else with you.To all of which I say: whatever. It's an outlandish theory, but I suppose not a whole lot more so than other time travel theories. At any rate, Si Morley can do it, and repeatedly goes back to New York in 1882 with the idea of observing a certain event. Naturally, he is only supposed to observe, and not get involved in any way with any of the people of that time. Of course, that doesn't work out so well.And the story itself becomes much different from what you think it will be as it goes along, which is always appreciated. Dealing with the ethics and possibilities of time travel, Si must make a decision that could effect the course of American history. In the end, though, he makes what seems to be a different decision.Finney deals with these complexities in a subtle, interesting way, saving this book from becoming just another "Connecticut Yankee".
  • (4/5)
    A great time travel book. It didn't feel "science-fictiony." The author obviously did his homework and conveyed a great sense of history. The ending was quite entertaining as well. Simon Morley was well written and the illustrations brought the book to life.
  • (4/5)
    A book that is classified science fiction but the is very little science and a whole lot of fiction. Written decades ago, the central plot involves the main character time traveling back to the 1890's (a crazy government project). Initially he is told to not change a single thing during that era but as time passes he eventually does. This novel is pretty preachy about how bad things are in the 1960's and 70's and how wonderful things are in the past even though they have crime and other problems. A little too descriptive and romanticized for my taste.
  • (4/5)
    Six-word review: Imagination takes flight across the decades.Extended review:Recruited as a subject for an extremely secret government project, commercial artist Simon Morley bridges the interval from the New York City of 1970 to the same city as it was in 1882. How his life and those of others change as a result is the plot of the novel, which blends mystery and romance with the ever-intriguing theme of time travel. There's a nice twist at the end.The author isn't shy about revealing his fascination with the everyday sights and events of New York in the late nineteenth century; in fact, at times it seems as if his whole purpose were to show off the extent of his research. He has an ability to bring the period and place to life, as if he himself had seen it first hand, making us feel as though we were seeing it too. Finney's use of contemporary illustrative art, photographs, and newspaper stories lends authenticity to his very evocative rendition of time and place. If at times it does seem to grow long, I think perhaps that's only a matter of my own twenty-first-century impatience, cultivated by an environment in which a five-second computer response time is referred to as "forever."One of the most interesting aspects of this story, however, is almost certainly outside the author's design: namely, his depiction of a major U.S. city in the late middle of the twentieth century. In 1970, Richard Nixon was president; the Cuban missile crisis and the Kennedy assassination were events in recent memory; the Civil Rights movement was in progress, although (to judge from the author's use of language: young women are all "girls") women's liberation had a long way to go in raising public consciousness; pollution was already a major issue, but computers were still a novelty, and small electronic devices were science fiction. In contrasting 1882 with 1970, Finney shows us a period 46 years ago that seems calmer and safer than 2016, even though in so many ways it already felt dark and dangerous at the time.This is not a heavy or especially serious book, although it has its moments (and there are a few little questions of logic and continuity). It's mostly just an entertaining fantasy, with an extra dose of verisimilitude to make us feel as if we'd been there. And that we might want to go again.
  • (3/5)
    I can see potential in this time travel novel, but the scenes in it dragged on for far too long. I enjoyed the character relationships the most.
  • (4/5)
    Since my teens, I've rarely delved into science fiction. Other than Kurt Vonnegut's novels and short stories, most of the S-F I've read hasn't appealed to me very much. I know that that's not a fair judgment of the entire genre. Surely there's a lot of good stuff out there. I just haven't found it. So when I read in Stephen King's afterword to his 11-22-63 that he considered Jack Finney's TIME AND AGAIN to be the best time travel he'd ever read, I put it on my list.And I'm glad I did. Finney does a masterful job of putting the reader back in the year 1882 in the bustling metropolis of New York City. It's a great read.
  • (4/5)
    Double the time travel for your money: New York in 1882 & 1970. Finney is weirdly and pleasingly meticulous about describing how people eat their sandwiches, move chairs around, play practical jokes. It brings the quotidian to humdrum life in the modern-day scenes and highlights the fantastical in 19th century life. Plot twists & turns are by far the least interesting part.
  • (3/5)
    So far, it's interesting! I like time travel and historical books, so this fits both!
  • (4/5)
    A timeless classic that is perhaps more relevant now than when it was written.
  • (4/5)
    I am so happy to have read this book. For a few hours of just sheer escape time, it was worth every second. Secondly, I love the notion that time travel can be done without getting into all the scientific & jargonistic explanations which I don't understand anyway. Si Morley just wishes it and it is so. My problem with the book: no one told me this was going to be a romance!!! Plus, there really is some logic disruption here in certain parts. Overall, however, I loved this book and the mystery aspect kept me tuned in.brief outline:Si Morley, who works at an advertising firm in New York City has been "selected" as a possible candidate for a secret project run by a group of scientists, historians & the military. He is subjected to various types of tests before he even finds out what the deal is: traveling back in time. He is slated to go to San Francisco but instead chooses to go back to New York of 1882, to solve a mystery for a friend. He occupies an apartment at the prestigious Dakota, one which stood vacant in 1882, leaving some part of 1882 in that room. (It's complicated.) Anyway, he makes the trip back and although warned not to interact with anyone, he realizes that he cannot be a true part of time without involving himself with those around him. His interactions have to do with the mystery he is bent on solving, and make up the bulk of the story, leading Si to a point where he must make some serious choices that may have an impact on the future.I loved the old photos & drawings; they really were able to make things a bit more real for a time.This is one of those books that should not be missed. I can even forgive the romance.
  • (4/5)
    A surprisingly fun tale combining history, science fiction, and mystery. Finney deals with romance, crime and time travel. A good read.
  • (3/5)
    The plot was pretty predictable. Great descriptive of NYC in 1882 though.
  • (4/5)
    There's something magical in the writing style of this book. Something that makes there seem (to me) to be less plot, less drama - but makes the subtlety, the emphasis on place & time, to be more than enough to make up for the lack of excitement. I don't know exactly how I feel about this book - it's not SF but I can't seem to view it clearly through a lens of literature either - all I really have is a fuzzy sense of goodwill towards it. And this is the second time I've read it. Maybe I'll get more as I discuss it with fellow fans of Time Travel in our Group Read, this June 2014.
  • (4/5)
    Thanks to insomnia and a slow shift at work, I read all of Jack Finney's remarkable book Time and Again, which was written in 1970. Both historical fiction and science fiction, the focus of the novel is time travel through a process of intense learning about a period in the past combined with the practice of self-hypnosis. And it works! Artist Simon Morley is the first to jump to the past successfully, from 1970 New York City to the same city in 1882. Despite his careful preparation for the journey backwards, Simon is overwhelmed, not surprisingly, by the reality of being in New York in 1882. Everything is the same, but different. Trinity Church is the tallest building in the city. The Statue of Liberty does not yet grace the harbour. Food tastes better, houses are colder, fire is lethal as almost everything in the city is made of wood. Fire plays a large and terrifying role in the book. Like any good story, there is a romance - or two, in this case, one in the present and one in the past. There are schemes of blackmail, murder, sledding in Central Park on a snowy day, and the joys and struggles of a sudden transition to a different era, a different century. I liked the book and thought that Finney's story had interesting ideas, and certainly it is a good book. May I say that it was, possibly, too masculine for my taste? There was a flavour of a Boys' Own periodical in it that I never could get past, where women are in the script because they have to be, not because they're welcome. Finney is obviously no woman-hater: the women he designs for Morley are capable, intelligent, beautiful, and feisty, but there is a masculinity to them as well. Still, it was a good and creative book, and I enjoyed reading it.
  • (4/5)
    I read this time travel book set in New York many years ago when I worked at WaldenBooks. I wondered if it would still hold up after so long. FOr the most part, it did. Nice little twist ending that I'd blessedly forgotten.