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The Little House

The Little House

Написано Virginia Lee Burton

Озвучено Frances Kelley


The Little House

Написано Virginia Lee Burton

Озвучено Frances Kelley

оценки:
4.5/5 (60 оценки)
Длина:
13 minutes
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 1972
ISBN:
9780545637619
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

A little country house finds out what its like to live in the city.
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 1972
ISBN:
9780545637619
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Virginia Lee Burton (1909-1968) was the talented author and illustrator of some of the most enduring books ever written for children. The winner of the 1942 Caldecott Medal for THE LITTLE HOUSE, Burton's books include heroes and happy endings, lively illustrations, and a dash of nostalgia. She lived with her two sons, Aristides and Michael, and her husband George Demetrios, the sculptor, in a section of Gloucester, Massachusetts, called Folly Cove. Here she taught a class in design and from it emerged the Folly Cove designers, a group of internationally known professional artisans. She is the author of many classic children's picture books, including MIKE MULLIGAN AND HIS STEAM SHOVEL and KATY AND THE BIG SNOW.

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Что люди думают о The Little House

4.5
60 оценки / 49 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    This book takes you on a little journey about a house. This house belonged to a family for generations and generations and through many different seasons. The house talks about the different seasons and why she loved each of them. During each season the house would talk about how the tree change through each season and what the family would do during the seasons. The house witnessed a city being built around her. As the city grew the house come more sad because she didn't get to see the seasons change or the starts everyone night. The house was getting very sad and very run down when finally someone bought the little house and put her on a pretty and quite hill. The little house was home again and was very happy. This is a good fantasy book because the author gives the house human feelings and opinions about the seasons. The house has feeling on thing going on around just like humans would have feelings about thing going on around them.
  • (5/5)
    The Little House is a book that touches on so many themes. Read it. Just read it. Then weep. Because weeping is the only acceptable conclusion to reading about a house that is loved and yet is curious about and enveloped by progress only to regret knowing more and wishing to return to simpler times when it was loved and cherished.
  • (5/5)
    When I was little, this was the book I always wanted to read at my grandma and grandpa's house. I think the story appealed to me because in kindergarten, my parents bought a house and we moved from our rental that was being moved to make way for storage buildings. I remember first feeling devastated that our house was not going to be there anymore, so this book was extremely comforting to me. As an adult, I still love the illustrations and the story. This one will always have a place in my heart.
  • (3/5)
    This Caldecott winner was first published in 1942. It tells the story of a little house, set on a hill amid a field of daisies, with apple orchards, and a pond where the children swim in summer and ice skate in winter. Over the years the city encroaches, until the little house is abandoned in a canyon of skyscrapers. Until one day the great-great-granddaughter of the man who build the Little House sees it, and has it moved to a new spot in the country. The illustrations are lovely and bright when depicting the country; but they are dark and dirty looking when depicting the big city. I can see why it won the Caldecot, but I thought the story line was a little depressing.
  • (3/5)
    Caldecott Medal, 1943

    A cute, peaceful book.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:It's about a Little Red House that is built in the country. She is happy just being there. As time passed things around her changed. Industry grew up around her till she was smashed between two big buildings. The family that built her also grew up and changed leave her more lonely as the kids grew. Finally a distant family member of the original builder of the house found her and uprooted the house and moved it to a country and peaceful spot. She was able to be happy again because she had a family and was in a peaceful place.Personal Reaction: I remember this book from when I was younger, and also remembering that it was an older style book then. Its a sad story that focuses on how things change as we grow especially when I miss my family. In the end though change can be an adjustment and sad, but it can also be positive in the end. The drawing and coloring of the book is older and aged. It looks like it is a chalk like texture. The concept that industry came where wasn't any was also a big sign of the age of the book. It also hints at the loss of focus on the true importance of things and people.Extension Ideas:-ask the children about older siblings moving away or moving out of the house you grew up in. How did it make them feel?-Have the kids draw the house they grew up in.
  • (5/5)
    Summary of Book:The story line is one of change and the journey during this change. The artwork is color pencils and ink which shows the different changes and the emotions of the character. The character in the story is a house. This story starts with a farmer, who builds a house for his family to live in for generations to come. As the story continues, the house develops a human persona. The story talks about how the house watches its owners lives, how the seasons came and went. The house would watch the city light in the distance and wondered what it would be like to be a part of the city. As time went by, the family grows, as well as the city. As the city grows, it grows around the house. At first, the house appears happy with the changes, but as the changes continue and the family moves on, and forgets the little house, it becomes lonely and unhappy. Then one day the granddaughter of the farmer remembers the forgotten house. She has the house moved back out to the country, where the little house once again watches the sun, stars, and the changing seasons. The little house once again is loved and happy.Personal Reaction:I remember reading this book as a young girl. I remember feeling sorry for the little house because the family forgot it. As an adult, I see more how the book represents the changes we go through as we grow. As children our life is simple, like the country living, then we become adults, we become busy with our family friends and jobs, which is show in the city. Finally we become older, we retire, our lives become easier once again, back to country living.Extension ideas:1. I would ask the children how they think the house feels when it is in the country, at different times in the city and once again, when the house is back in the country. 2. I would ask the children how they might feel if they were the little house.3. I would have the children draw or create a picture of the house showing one of its feelings.
  • (4/5)
    Built to stand the test of time, a little pink house leads a happy life in the countryside, watching the sun rise and set, the moon wax and wane, and the human generations go by. She occasionally wonders what life is like in the big city, never dreaming that one day her curiosity will be satisfied. One day a road is put in, running right by her front yard, and soon the area around her is filled with homes. The homes gives way to buildings, the buildings grow ever taller, and trolley-cars and then an elevated train-track appear before her door. Eventually the little house finds that she cannot see the moon or stars, because of the lights of the city, that she sees the sun only at noon, and that she has become dirty and dilapidated. Is it the end for the Little House? Or is another change in store...?Awarded the Caldecott Medal in 1943, this classic picture-book from Virginia Lee Burton, also the creator of such beloved childhood titles as Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel and Katy and the Big Snow, is a sweet tale that, for all its vintage artwork, feels very fresh and contemporary to me. There are days when, part of a rushing crowd here on the streets of New York City, or squeezed into a packed subway car, I long for quieter, calmer locales - places where I can smell the flowers and see the trees. Even in the less crowded suburban town where I live, I sometimes long for the fresh beauty of the country - somewhere I can sit and really see the stars! Burton taps into that longing with this story of change, painting a portrait of development that is by no means flattering. There is real pathos in the transformation of the world around the house, who is overtaken by urban sprawl, and slowly strangled by the inherent disadvantages of city life, just as there is joy in her liberation from urbanity, and her renewed existence as a family home. The artwork has an old-fashioned feeling to it, but is still very appealing. I particularly liked the way that changing fashions - in both clothing and mode of transportation - are chronicled in the illustrations, through the parade of tiny people and vehicles passing by the house in each scene.In sum: an engaging, heartwarming tale is joined to appealing artwork in The Little House, making it a book that (much like the house itself) has stood the test of time.
  • (4/5)
    I'd forgotten what a charming story this is. Maybe I appreciate it more now in middle age than when I was a kid. (I don't even remember this book as a kid, now that I think about it.)

    I enjoyed how the book depicts the transitions of the months, the seasons, and the inventions of a growing population. In the end, I was happy that the home found a new home.
  • (4/5)
    The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton

    Story about the differences you face between country and city life.
  • (5/5)
    I choose this story because it was my favorite book when I was little, I used to feel so awful for the little house and I wanted to save it. The story talks about this little house in the country that is so happy and so full of life. But life happens to the little house and a huge towering city is eventually built around the little house. The house is so tiny it gets lost in the big city and starts to fall apart until it is moved back out to the country and given attention again. One of my favorite things about this book is the illustration of the house throughout the story. In the beginning we see that with the windows and front steps that the house is somewhat smiling but as the story goes on and the house starts to get over taken by the hustle and bustle of the city the windows slunk down and the porch frowns and the reader can see how unhappy and hurt the house becomes. That is until it is moved back out to the country and loved once more. The big idea of this book is that everything, and in this case a little house, has it's own place. Not everyone is cut out for the city and everything needs individual love. The reader can also see how damaging over construction can be to something that was once so beautiful. This story is still to this day one of my favorite books.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:The Little House features a little house in the country that was well built and was strong. The man who built her never wants to sell her and she should live for generations to generations. The Little House was happy watching the seasons change, and the moons & stars at night. She was surprised to see the vehicles changing, roads being built and the countryside changing. The little house thought this must be the city for nothing stood still. The little house dreamed of the country she remembered. The house was very sad. The story is showing changes all round while the great great granddaughter was wanting to call the little house home and bring her back to the country.Personal Reaction:I learned you can have a wonderful life where your at and the next day it can change by reading this book. The little house never gave up on high fast everything was moving around her and one day having your dreams come true. It is a humbling experience and knowing being curious about something never is quite what it seems and being back home is the best place to be. Home is where the Heart is.Classroom Extensions Idea:1. In the classroom, I would share this story with everyone. It was a great book that I read when I was little and now my girls read it too for being curious and living where you are curious are two different things.2. In addition, learning about city life and the difference from country life. I would certainly show where the city is and the country on a map and ask each student which place would you rather live.
  • (5/5)
    Summary:This book is about a house that was given life by the builder who was determined not to sell the house and to pass t down from generation to generation. The house was built in the country and was never moved but the surroundings all around had changed. Everyone grew up and moved out. As time went on the house was condemned and the great grand kids found the house and moved it back to the country out of the city. The great great granddaughter placed the house and took of the house. Personal reaction:This story was very sweet and has great historical family background that I enjoyed reading in the author's sons history. His name s Aris Demetrios and he is the acclaimed sculptor. The story is over seventy years old. Classroom Extension:1) Study of affects of time2)Moving and transitioning changes3) Time Capsule: write a story and open time capsule for 1 year, 5 year ect....
  • (5/5)
    Summary: This book is about a little house that is built in the country and the city built up to where it was surrounding the little house. The little house got lonely and sad because it missed being in the country. One day the great-great-granddaughter noticed the little house and moved it back to the country.Personal Reaction: This book is one of my favorites. It has such good illustrations that go along with the words. I think that every child should read this book.Classroom Extensions: 1) I would use this book to show children that it is not always greener on the other side. 2) After reading the book, the children could use construction paper and create their own little house.
  • (5/5)
    This was my absolute favorite book when I was a child. When I look at the cover of this book I think about my childhood. This story is about a little house who lives in the country and always wondered what it would be like to live in the city, until the day it actually started to happen. Through out the whole book there are amazing illustrations of the house and her journey through this experience. I love it because the details of the pictures really show the changes. The house goes from living in the country to a suburb, to a city, then back to the country. Each page shows a little more detail on how much her surroundings have changed, which is what I like the most. The story and font also change shape on every page and are fun shapes and make it interesting to keep reading the story. I would definitely read this book to my classroom and teach a lesson on it. It's just a fun and entertaining read!
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a little house who lives on top of a hill out in the country. She just sits there watching the seasons go by wondering what it would be like to live in the city. Years go by and slowly the city starts moving in around her. Apartment buildings are constructed, road ways are paved, and elevated train tracks all crowd around the little house. The poor house just waits there surrounded by noise and city until the great-great-granddaughter of the house's original builder finds it and moves it back out into the country where the house can finally be happy once again. Personal Reflection: This was my absolute favorite book while I was growing up. In many ways, people can relate to this little house. We are all just trying to find our place in this world. We are also curious about new ideas wether or not they may be good for us. This book tells such a wonderful story through its text and most importantly through its illustrations which portray each moment of the little house's life. Extension: 1. Ask the students to describe their dream house and create a drawing of it. Make sure to include where it's located, how big it is, who lives in it, and anything else that makes their dream house unique. 2. With selected supplies, make a class (or group) house. Each season, decorate the outside to celebrate the beauty of each season.
  • (4/5)
    A sweet little house we built in the country, sturdy enough to stand the tests of time. She sat happily on a hill watching the seasons come and go wondering what life would be like in a city. Then slowly things around her began to change around her and before she knew it she was surrounded by tall buildings and bustling cars. The city had come to her but it was not kind to her and she longed for the days in the country where she could see the stars and watch the flowers grow. Then one day a woman walked by and realized that the sad old house was the one build by her grandfather and decided to move it back to the country where she belongs.This a a great book with lovely soft illustrations the depict the changes felt by the house. It could be used to talk about the changes in time, season, city life vs. country life, and to be grateful for the things we have and to appreciate nature.
  • (5/5)
    Anniversary edition of the Caldecott Medal-winning classic.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:A man built a house that he hoped would stay in his family for generations to come. The house was built in the country and loved being there. Many years passed and a city was built around the little house. No one lived in her anymore and she did not like living in the city. One day the man's great-great granddaughter found the house and her and her husband moved the house into the country. There all three of them lived happily ever after.Personal Reaction:This story reminds me of the movie UP. Though the old man in UP lived in a town and the city built up around him. I liked the story. I grew up in the country and still live in the country. Classroom Extension Ideas:1. Have the children draw a picture of their house. In the windows and doors have them draw their family members. Over the family members staple a piece of construction paper so the paper and be lifted up to reveal the family members. 2. Watch the movie UP. Though not closely related to the book, it would give the children a look into how things change over time.
  • (4/5)
    I know this wasn't the point of the book, but this story really got me thinking about how much I've been struggling against our new suburban lifestyle. I was longing for urban living---public transit, museums...sidewalks---and I've been chafing a under the difficulty of pedestrian travel, how spread out we are from the people we know, and how much we depend on our car where we live now. But this book helped highlight for me the things I like about living "out in the country".

    My kids like the story, too, although my daughter is disappointed that it's not a Laura Ingalls Wilder "Little House" story. She seems feel offended at the false advertising of the title.
  • (5/5)
    The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton is now one of my favorite children's books. Having recently read this book with a child, I found this book educational and interesting. The Little House talks about night and day, the seasons, and the changing world. I would recommend this book to parents and teachers. The Little House is also a Caldecott winner for its great illustrations.
  • (5/5)
    Genre: Realistic Fiction Review: I love this book! It reminds me of the Disney movie "Up." This story is a realistic fiction story because something like this could happen. A whole town would not be built one house. Because it is not true and it did not really happen, it is realistic fiction. Media: colored pencils
  • (5/5)
    This delightful book brings a house to life and watches it change throughout time. Caldecott award winner
  • (4/5)
    This book, as the title implies, tells the story of a little house who lived in the open country on a field of daisies where you could watch the changes in seasons. The little house loved to watch the kids playing and the apples ripen but one day they started to build a road and took the little houses field of daisies away from her. Then her landscape started to change. Instead of apple trees there were high rise condos so high that she could no longer see the different moons. The little house's people left too so she was left to herself with cracking paint and crooked shutters until the granddaughter of the man that built the house recognized her and brought the little house back to the country where she belonged.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting book about a little house built (apparently in the 19th century) that lives through the seasons and, ultimately, the changing of times and urbanization of countryside. The story actually gets pretty sad there for a while, but has a happy ending when the great-great-grand-child of the original builder finds the house and relocates it to the countryside. Useful certainly for discussions of urban sprawl, country life, growth and change, development of farmland. The "litlte house" is gendered female, so it's a female protagonist. But since the little house is wholly passive, while it's a sympathetic portrayal, it's not what I would call a strong female role model. Be sure to pair with inanimate females that are shown as strong actors in the world -- e.g., maybe "The Little Engine That Could", if you're on a nostalgia kick.
  • (5/5)
    Oh urban sprawl. A story of a house in the country that becomes engulfed by the city and then saved by being relocated back to the countryside. A book that teaches one be careful what you wish for. Also, a lesson on being content, happy, and appreciative of what you already have. Granted the house did not have a choice to go to the city, the city came to her but the house wanted to know how it would be to live in the city. The illustrations are a key part of the story. The illustrations extend the text by showing the difference between the calm and peaceful countryside compared to the frantic, fast pace, dirty and crowded city life. I enjoy the fact that the reader can hear of the transformation of the little house as well as see the transformation through the illustrations. I wonder why the illustrator chose a curved road, I am sure there is a major reason but it strikes me funny of all the curved roads, especially the main road in front of the little house. A deserved winner for the Caldecott awards, I would say not so much for the groundbreaking style or format but how well the illustrations help the text.Ages 5 and 7
  • (5/5)
    No wonder this book has been in publication for over 60 years! Your child will love this book because it shows both how things change in an emotional way. Your child will love it.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about "a Little House way out n the country" that was built during the turn-of-the-century that experiences the passage of the seasons and time as the countryside becomes urbanized and modernized. The passage of time and the seasons are represented in the illustrations of the sun passing overhead, the moon and the stars at night, a calendar with the phases of the moon, the house in spring, summer, winter and fall. Modernization is represented in illustrations of urban growth around the Little House from suburban housing to apartments and buildings. The history of modes of transportation is also illustrated from the horse-and-buggy to trains and automobiles. In the end, the Little House is brought back to the quiet and peaceful countryside to a spot on a hill "with apple trees growing around."
  • (5/5)
    This is a heartwarming and sometimes heartbreaking tale of a little house that was built on a beautiful countryside. The house loves the quiet nature of the country. It is able to watch the seasons change and the sun, moon and stars shine with nothing obstructing its view. The family that lives within takes wonderful care of it and life is good. But slowly more roads are built which then leads to more people. More people mean more buildings and eventually the laid back countryside becomes a bustling, busy, dirty city. The little house can no longer see the sun or the moon or the stars and slowly it is falling into disrepair. Then one day, the great great granddaughter of the original owner recognized the poor little house, put it on the back of a moving truck and placed it on the beautiful rolling hills of a nearby countryside. Once again the house was happy and had a wonderful family living within.
  • (3/5)
    A sweet, classic story about a house that is built in the country while the city grows up around it. This is a great commentary about how times change and people grow.