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The Open Boat

The Open Boat

Написано Stephen Crane

Озвучено Deaver Brown


The Open Boat

Написано Stephen Crane

Озвучено Deaver Brown

оценки:
2.5/5 (3 оценки)
Длина:
1 час
Издано:
30 дек. 2010 г.
ISBN:
9781614961147
Формат:

Описание

"The Open Boat" is considered Stephen Crane's finest work and one of the great short stories of all time. The story begins with four men in an open boat, subject to the vagaries of the sea after their ship went down. The Captain, though injured, retains control over the boat and its occupants by force of habit and uncanny skills. In this trial, he proves his worth, putting his men first, guiding them at every step of the way. When they finally have to swim for it because they can't land the boat on shore, the Captain subordinates his own interests in being saved to go after another. Each man is called only by his title, the Correspondent, the Oiler, and the Cook. The oiler rises up to prominence and called by name, the only one that is honored so. He is clearly set up to fail and die as he does, and did in the real life event as well.

Nature is indifferent to these men bobbing on the surface of the sea. Yes, the sea threatens, but in no unusual way and they make it to land ultimately. A shark circles the boat, almost playing with it, but then moves on. This is the home of the sea and the shark and Crane treats them this way. The interesting part is nature is not in conflict with the men; nature is indifferent to them. The people on shore don't help much but they help enough to help save three of the four men. Crane tells his story as a painter would, with the most marvelous descriptions of color, the scene, and the internal movements. The story comes through better in the listening than the writing for these reasons as you can sit back and listen to the word pictures Crane paints. Many later authors used this story for their own learning and purposes. Perhaps the most interesting is fellow poet, James Dickey, who also has an event over water with four men, with three surviving. In both cases the others declare the best of them died. A landmark American story.

Издано:
30 дек. 2010 г.
ISBN:
9781614961147
Формат:

Об авторе

Stephen Crane was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1871. He died in Germany on June 5, 1900.


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2.7
3 оценки / 4 Обзоры
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  • (1/5)
    The Open Boat may be a classic, and at some point I might re-read it. Mr. Brown's narration, however, is so horrendous that I'm seriously annoyed after having finished this book. In the introduction, Mr. Brown proclaims how fantastic a short-story The Open Boat is. He still manages to sound so bored that he's about to fall asleep while reading it. There is no flow, no eagerness, no separation between the characters. He might as well be reading a user manual.

    If you want a good audio version of this story, keep looking.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent short story. Crane writes in a clear and concise style that holds up remarkably well even by modern standards. The Open Boat is a captivating true life account of his and 3 others struggles to survive in the open sea in a tiny dingy. On a deeper level, Crane writes of the impersonal and arbitrary forces of nature. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    A great example of the genre Naturalism
  • (4/5)
    I read Crane's "Red Badge of Courage" while in high school and without ever giving it a second thought over the years I've always recommended it highly to anyone who's ever asked. But after reading "The Open Boat," it seems I'd forgotten exactly how powerful a writer Crane really was.

    I've never quite shared in the ultimate philosophy of writers like London, Conrad, and Crane yet they perpetually rank among my favorites, mainly I think, because the masculine vocabulary and narrative of "naturalist" deism (and sometimes atheism) speaks so well to those like myself who are or have been in constant contact with the dangers of outdoor life and work; those who know that their fate rests primarily in their own hands; those who know that one slip-up could cost them not simply their daily meal but their very lives. The "naturalist" relies upon the observation that although there may be a "grand architect" behind all that we see in this world, he/she/it is indifferent to our cares. It is not an agnosticism, but really that the idea that revelation, miracles, or any type of divine relationship between man and his creator is nonexistant. It is the belief that in nature, we are at the mercy only of our own abilities. How Crane came to hold such views, especially at such a young age, I can't comprehend, yet they are very evident in "The Open Boat" and it makes for extraordinarily beautiful though lonely sentiment:

    "...During this dismal night, it may be remarked that a man would conclude that it was really the intention of the seven mad gods to drown him, despite the abominable injustice of it. For it was certainly an abominable injustice to drown a man who had worked so hard, so hard. The man felt it would be a crime most unnatural. Other people had drowned at sea since galleys swarmed with painted sails, but still --

    When it occurs to a man that nature does not regard him as important, and that she feels she would not maim the universe by disposing of him, he at first wishes to throw bricks at the temple, and he hates deeply the fact that there are no bricks and no temples. Any visible expression of nature would surely be pelleted with his jeers.

    Then, if there be no tangible thing to hoot he feels, perhaps, the desire to confront a personification and indulge in pleas, bowed to one knee, and with hands supplicant, saying: "Yes, but I love myself."

    A high cold star on a winter's night is the word he feels that she says to him. Thereafter he knows the pathos of his situation..."


    Crane does not entirely discount that miracles happen, just that they are rather rare natural turns of luck that few men are fortunate to witness or partake in. Near the end of the story, when rescue is at hand, a wave carries the "correspondent" over the capsized boat, he makes it a point to call this "a miracle of the sea."

    However, Crane does give some hope in the story that even if we are at the mercy of nature, we are still worthy of survival because in the end we are capable of saving each other. For there are men, like the captain in the dinghy, that can still exhibit a duty toward other men as regards their cold station in life, and he paints a near messianic picture of his selflessness as he stood in the water with "a halo on his head" and shining "like a saint."

    I never did nor will I agree with the basis of deism/naturalism but it makes for incredible literature. 4.5 stars and another look at Stephen Crane.