Найдите свой следующий любимый аудиокнига

Станьте участником сегодня и слушайте бесплатно в течение 30 дней
The Red Tent: 20th Anniversary Edition

The Red Tent: 20th Anniversary Edition

Автором Anita Diamant

Озвучено Carol Bilger


The Red Tent: 20th Anniversary Edition

Автором Anita Diamant

Озвучено Carol Bilger

оценки:
4.5/5 (319 оценки)
Длина:
12 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Mar 1, 2003
ISBN:
9781593971328
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Deeply affecting, The Red Tent combines rich storytelling with a valuable contribution in modern fiction: a new perspective of female life in biblical society. It is a vast and stirring work described as what the Bible might have been had it been written by God's daughters instead of sons.

Far beyond the traditional women-of-the-Bible sagas in both impact and vigor, The Red Tent is based upon a mention in Genesis of Jacob's only female offspring—his daughter, Dinah.

Author Anita Diamant, in the voice of Dinah, gives an insider's look at the details of women's lives in biblical times and a chronicle of their earthy stories and long-ignored histories. The red tent of the title is the place where women were sequestered during their cycles of birthing, menses, and illness. It is here that Dinah hears the whispered stories of her four mothers—Jacob's wives Leah, Rachel, Zilpah, and Bilhah—and tells their tales to us in remarkable and thought-provoking oratories. Familiar passages from the Bible take on new life as Dinah fills in what the Bible has left out—the lives of women. Dinah tells us of her initiation into the religious and sexual practices of the tribe; Jacob's courtship with Rachel and Leah; the ancient world of caravans, farmers, midwives, and slaves; her ill-fated sojourn in the city of Sechem; her years in Canaan; and her half-brother Joseph's rise in Egypt.

Skillfully interweaving biblical tales with characters of her own invention, the author re-creates the life of Dinah providing an illuminating portrait of a courageous woman and the life she might have lived. A new view of the panorama of life in biblical times emerges from the female perspective, and the red tent itself becomes a symbol of womanly strength, love, and wisdom.

Издатель:
Издано:
Mar 1, 2003
ISBN:
9781593971328
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Anita Diamant is the bestselling author of the novels The Boston Girl, The Red Tent, Good Harbor, The Last Days of Dogtown, and Day After Night, and the collection of essays, Pitching My Tent. An award-winning journalist whose work appeared in The Boston Globe Magazine and Parenting, and many others, she is the author of six nonfiction guides to contemporary Jewish life. She lives in Massachusetts. Visit her website at AnitaDiamant.com.

Связано с The Red Tent

Похоже на «Аудиокниги»
Похожие статьи

Обзоры

Что люди думают о The Red Tent

4.3
319 оценки / 238 Обзоры
Ваше мнение?
Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд

Отзывы читателей

  • (3/5)
    I'm not sure how I ended up with this book -- I believe it was recommended by Recorded Books Unlimited, I vaguely remembered its being controversial, and thus I added it to my Recorded Book list as part of my sworn duty to P.O.t.R.R.It's the sort of story I like, in theory, one told in the interstices of known tales, in between icons and themes we know and to which we are drawn. The fact that this unknown story is that of the women in a man's story adds interest. From that point of view, it is interesting. It not only provides an intriguing imagined life to the flat names and begats of the Bible's women, but reminds one how much could be and would be unsaid, how many women and even gods have been forgotten.That said, the story often strays into cliché, the writing is serviceable but seldom moving, and the extreme prettiness of the female characters, handsomeness of the love interests, and lustiness of their nuptial joys can grate.Interesting, engaging and imaginative, but occasionally trite or excessive.The reader, Carol Bilger, does a fine job, and the musical interludes (mostly at the ends and beginnings of tapes) are genuinely appropriate and atmospheric.
  • (5/5)
    This was a most unusual book. First of all, the writing is superb. It is a novel that is not intended to be a work of fact or historical fiction, but on that note what I found most interesting was the customs and viewpoints of that time in history. The novel reveals the traditions And turmoils of ancient womanhood. The men did not enter or know what happened in the red tent. This is the story of Jacob in Genesis. The author calls her work "midrash" which I took to mean taking a factual story and filling in the blanks of what may have happened. It is in the voice of Dinah, the only daughter of Jacob mentioned in the Bible. Dinah is a very minor character in the Bible but what a story Diamanté has woven. I highly recommend.
  • (5/5)
    About Dinah, the daughter of Jacob and Leah.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing. One of my all-time favorites.
  • (5/5)
    one of the best books i have ever read!
  • (5/5)
    Devastatingly heartbreaking tale.Dinah is the young daughter of Jacob. She has many aunties and together with her mother they share stories and legends and teach her the ways of womanhood under the red tent where women go once a month. But when she falls in love with a prince of a different house her father and vengeful selfish brothers will have none of it. Murder and devastation befall Dinah more times then we can count. And yet somehow she makes it through it all. Perhaps a little worse for wear and broken hearted but still in one piece. And most importantly, still remembered.I LOVED THIS BOOK!!! Such amazing storytelling. This book brought me to tears numerous times, and at other times I wanted to throw the book across the room. The author writes in a way that is easy to follow but still gives you a taste of the old world and the way it was before time began as we know it. Back when women kept ancient secrets about their bodies and their gods. This book is riveting and I enjoyed it immensely. It speaks of strength and courage beyond reckoning. I would recommend this book to all women everywhere! If you are a woman you need to read this book.
  • (1/5)
    I tried reading it then listening to it. I did not like this book, I'm sorry! I know it has gotten rave reviews but I didn't enjoy the story. I surrendered about halfway through.
  • (4/5)
    I read this more than ten years ago when I was in grad school. I don't normally re-read books, but I truly enjoyed it the first time, and wanted to give it another go around before watching the movie.

    I find it funny that so many reviewers criticize Ms. Diamant for taking too much creative license. What do they think fiction is?!
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful story.
  • (4/5)
    A well written book. I am not sure what to say about this book. I found parts of it quite interesting and thought the author crafted her story very creatively. However, I did not enjoy her secular view of the old Bible story. Jacob and his sons were turned into brutal, unforgivable, barbarous men. God was turned into "El", one of many, many gods worshipped in this story. I agree that Jacob and his sons did some terrible things, and his family carried idols of other gods, but she went too far and changed too many things. In the book, Jacob works 7 months (not years) for Rachel. It is interesting to get a different perspective on the story though, and to consider how things might have been. I appreciate that about this story. Read the origial version of this story in the Bible in Genesis 20-50.
  • (5/5)
    excellent.
  • (5/5)
    Thank you Dawn for lending this to me! Fantastic book!
  • (2/5)
    Reimagining the story of Dinah in the Bible, The Red Tent brings us into the women's tents of the wives of the patriarch Jacob. Through Dinah's eyes, we get the story of her life, from her mother Leah and aunts Rachel, Zilpah, and Bilhah through the entirety of Dinah's life. Here we see the tent not as seclusion during menstruation but a celebration of womanhood, sacrifices to goddesses and celebrations of the new moon, and the importance of childbearing. I have no particular problem with retellings, and in fact enjoy fairy tale retellings quite a bit when I can recognize the original story and see where an author has gone into his or her own interpretation of it. In the same vein as The Mists of Avalon, The Red Tent takes a male-dominated story and tells it from the women's point of view. That's great as far as it goes, though few of the men come out in a good light in this telling. Beyond that, I simply wasn't engaged. I found it really boring, maybe because it was so epic in scope or maybe because I felt like the story wasn't reinterpreted so much as completely changed. I wasn't offended - though I imagine some might be - but I was constantly off-kilter as a result and not really sinking into the story.
  • (4/5)
    The Red Tent is a story of women; more specifically women who visit the Red Tent for 3 days each month during their menustral cycle. Adequately done, this book is quite predictable and a work of fiction. While it may contain Biblical characters, this is not historical fiction, a novel plain and simple.
  • (5/5)
    This novel is simply beautiful.Judaism, especially that of the ancient Hebrews, is often such a masculine thing. The sign of the covenant is to be performed on male children, the great movers, shakers, and founders of it are, unsurprisingly, all male. Women appear here and there, anecdotally, as mothers, in the occasional rollicking good story, but Judaism is not always put forth as something that really *belongs* to women.Then there is the red tent. In the red tent, every month, the wives of Jacob gather to practice their own deeply mystical, beautiful, and female rituals. It is a world where El is the god of Jacob, and the women commune with the spirits that grant fertility, sexual pleasure, and protect those in childbirth. And, as most who are passing familiar with the Bible know, the wives of Jacob have many sons (12 altogether) and no daughter to share their traditions, wisdom, and experiences with. And then Leah gives birth to Dinah,the only daughter, who will be left tell the reader of all those things, and also of her own loves, hurts, and feelings. While the biblical account of the rape of Dinah is the centerpiece of the story(it is not a rape here, but a love match construed as a rape by Dinah's brothers), it is so much more.For one, the story is deeply personal. From the beginning, Dinah does not speak to a nameless faceless someone, usually called "the reader," but to you. The recitation of her life, loves, beliefs, and deep sorrows is intensely intimate. The story itself is also quite gripping -- rich with detail, suspense, life and death.But most of all, I love the deep, well, femaleness of it all. In a tradition so dominated by the stories of men, it is nice to see a feminine side. The view of the red tent, not as a place to hide during a period of uncleanliness, but as a place for bonding, sharing, and yes, sometimes fighting and withholding, but, above all, as a female ritual, was a wonder to behold. Not to cast aspiration on the male side of things, mind you, but to find a place for the feminine within it.I'm not sure how accurate Diamant's account is, to be honest. But it moves me every time I read it. And I do so often. I think I need the occasional reminder to seek out my own space, find my own rituals, and appreciate the things my own mothers, grandmothers, and so forth, and so on, have passed to me. While I do not retreat into it monthly, this novel has become, in some ways, my red tent.
  • (5/5)
    So good! Friend recommended the book and it was worth every minute! Touches on feminism in an early biblical world.
  • (5/5)
    This book touched me like no other!!! Loved it!!
  • (5/5)
    Amazing. I have no words for the freedom this book has given me. For the words it has bestowed upon me to articulate the deepest and most ancient truths of my bones. Thank you for this gift. Blessings to the author, and blessings to each reader who’s heart it has the opportunity to touch.
  • (5/5)
    Beautifully written, poignant, heart wrenching. A powerful retelling of biblical stories, focused on the strength and bravery of women. Incredible read.
  • (5/5)
    I read this years ago...can't even remember what year, but since the mini-series is coming out soon, I felt I should at least list and rate it on here. This was a book that has stayed with me. A truly wonderful and memorable read.
  • (4/5)
    The Red Tent is a story of women; more specifically women who visit the Red Tent for 3 days each month during their menustral cycle. Adequately done, this book is quite predictable and a work of fiction. While it may contain Biblical characters, this is not historical fiction, a novel plain and simple.
  • (5/5)
    Devastatingly heartbreaking tale.Dinah is the young daughter of Jacob. She has many aunties and together with her mother they share stories and legends and teach her the ways of womanhood under the red tent where women go once a month. But when she falls in love with a prince of a different house her father and vengeful selfish brothers will have none of it. Murder and devastation befall Dinah more times then we can count. And yet somehow she makes it through it all. Perhaps a little worse for wear and broken hearted but still in one piece. And most importantly, still remembered.I LOVED THIS BOOK!!! Such amazing storytelling. This book brought me to tears numerous times, and at other times I wanted to throw the book across the room. The author writes in a way that is easy to follow but still gives you a taste of the old world and the way it was before time began as we know it. Back when women kept ancient secrets about their bodies and their gods. This book is riveting and I enjoyed it immensely. It speaks of strength and courage beyond reckoning. I would recommend this book to all women everywhere! If you are a woman you need to read this book.
  • (5/5)
    Wooow! An amazing storyline.... beautifully written. To be read with time and open heart
  • (5/5)
    All the stars go to Anita Diamant and her tran·scend·ent
    work of art, The Red Tent.
  • (3/5)
    This well-researched novel paints a vivid picture of life in the Middle East during Biblical times. Following the life of a minor Biblical character, Dinah, Diamant goes far beyond the few brief verses that mention her and creates a fully-fleshed-out character.

    I particularly liked how the author presents customs and mores that differ greatly from those of modern Western society without any attempt at justification or sensationalism, instead focusing on the common threads of humanity that bind all societies...
    There was an awful lot of graphic childbearing for my personal taste - but the main character is a midwife - and women's lives at that time in history DID revolve pretty strongly around children - so it's understandable (just not appealing!) Also, the author definitely makes an attempt to be evenhanded - a woman who does NOT want children makes an appearance. Although life in Canaan and Egypt is shown to be harsh, violent and difficult and women are not always treated justly by men, there are also men who are fair and caring. (not always the case in many femini-centric historical works)

    I was really afraid this book would be annoyingly religious - but it's not at all. The author really strives to be accurate in her portrayal of the religions and customs of the time, without overt critique.
  • (4/5)
    I was surprised at how much I loved this.
  • (5/5)
    This novel is simply beautiful.Judaism, especially that of the ancient Hebrews, is often such a masculine thing. The sign of the covenant is to be performed on male children, the great movers, shakers, and founders of it are, unsurprisingly, all male. Women appear here and there, anecdotally, as mothers, in the occasional rollicking good story, but Judaism is not always put forth as something that really *belongs* to women.Then there is the red tent. In the red tent, every month, the wives of Jacob gather to practice their own deeply mystical, beautiful, and female rituals. It is a world where El is the god of Jacob, and the women commune with the spirits that grant fertility, sexual pleasure, and protect those in childbirth. And, as most who are passing familiar with the Bible know, the wives of Jacob have many sons (12 altogether) and no daughter to share their traditions, wisdom, and experiences with. And then Leah gives birth to Dinah,the only daughter, who will be left tell the reader of all those things, and also of her own loves, hurts, and feelings. While the biblical account of the rape of Dinah is the centerpiece of the story(it is not a rape here, but a love match construed as a rape by Dinah's brothers), it is so much more.For one, the story is deeply personal. From the beginning, Dinah does not speak to a nameless faceless someone, usually called "the reader," but to you. The recitation of her life, loves, beliefs, and deep sorrows is intensely intimate. The story itself is also quite gripping -- rich with detail, suspense, life and death.But most of all, I love the deep, well, femaleness of it all. In a tradition so dominated by the stories of men, it is nice to see a feminine side. The view of the red tent, not as a place to hide during a period of uncleanliness, but as a place for bonding, sharing, and yes, sometimes fighting and withholding, but, above all, as a female ritual, was a wonder to behold. Not to cast aspiration on the male side of things, mind you, but to find a place for the feminine within it.I'm not sure how accurate Diamant's account is, to be honest. But it moves me every time I read it. And I do so often. I think I need the occasional reminder to seek out my own space, find my own rituals, and appreciate the things my own mothers, grandmothers, and so forth, and so on, have passed to me. While I do not retreat into it monthly, this novel has become, in some ways, my red tent.
  • (4/5)
    What a fantastic idea for a book. Take a minor character from the Bible who kind of disappears and build a book around her. Use the book as an opportunity to teach people about a life that most of us know very little about. This book follows Dinah, daughter of Jacob and Leah, from birth to death. There's nothing fancy about Diamont's writing style (in fact, periodically I considered parts dry), but the tale is fascinating.
  • (4/5)
    The Red Tent is a story of women; more specifically women who visit the Red Tent for 3 days each month during their menustral cycle. Adequately done, this book is quite predictable and a work of fiction. While it may contain Biblical characters, this is not historical fiction, a novel plain and simple.
  • (4/5)
    I am a sucker for classic stories told from a different perspective. Lots of really great writing, although I have to say that, stories like "and then Jacob made all the men of this town get circumcised and his sons murdered them anyway" work in he bible where you don't necessarily need explanations and motivations for everything, but I didn't think it translated incredibly well to this novel. Familial and religious tensions in the book didn't mount quite enough for me to understand why this mass circumcision/murder happened.