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Madeline's Rescue

Madeline's Rescue

Написано Ludwig Bemelmans

Озвучено Pauline Brailsford


Madeline's Rescue

Написано Ludwig Bemelmans

Озвучено Pauline Brailsford

оценки:
4/5 (40 оценки)
Длина:
6 minutes
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 1960
ISBN:
9780545258258
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Madeline and her classmates adopt a dog who rescues Madeline after she falls into a river.

Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 1960
ISBN:
9780545258258
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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4.0
40 оценки / 28 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    Prepping a preschool story time with an Around the World theme and read this gem I haven't read since elementary school. Still entertaining with beautiful illustrations.
  • (3/5)
    A classic, but just okay for me.
  • (2/5)
    This was just sitting there at the library this morning begging to be picked up, so I did so. However, I'm afraid I'm still not a fan. Like Kathryn, I just 'don't get it' and the meter and rhymes were far enough off to jar.
  • (4/5)
    The story opens with the same narration as the original picture book, up to the point where Madeline scares Miss Clavel by balancing on the edge of the bridge. Only in this book, Madeline doesn't just scare Miss Clavel; she falls off the bridge into the water. And that would have been the end for small Madeline, but that a dog jumped in the water and saved her from her watery doom. The girls adopt their canine hero, and Madeline is quickly recuperated. They name the dog Genevieve (a female dog for the female students). Aside from the fight that breaks out every night as the girls struggle to choose who gets to sleep with the dog, life is better than ever in the boarding school.Until the day the school inspectors pay a visit. They notice every detail; especially
  • (3/5)
    Parisian schoolgirl Madeline returns in this second picture-book devoted to her adventures, finding herself in need of rescue when her high-spirited antics land her in the Seine. When an obliging canine comes to her aid, fishing her out of the water, Madeline and her classmates (as well as their teacher, Miss Clavel) adopt the dog and name her Genevieve. All goes well with the new school resident, until the annual visit from the board of trustees, who insist that Genevieve must go. Can the girls and Miss Clavel find their beloved dog again, once she is ignominiously ejected from the school premises? And if they do, with whom will she sleep...?Both of these questions are happily resolved in Madeline's Rescue, which was originally published in 1953, and chosen as the Caldecott Medal-winner in 1954. This status as a Caldecott title - the first book, Madeline, won a Caldecott Honor in 1940 - led me to pay particular attention to the artwork, during my recent read. Although interesting enough, I am not sure the illustrations really spoke to me, although I did think that the few full-color spreads were far more appealing than the plainer, white and yellow ones. The story itself is more engaging - I loved Genevieve's surprise at the end! - although the rhyming text is rather awkward in places. With lines like: "From now on, I hope you will listen to me, / And here is a cup of camomile tea," or "The dog loved biscuits, milk and beef / And they named it Genevieve," it just didn't read that well. This was a low three stars from me, leaving me to ponder my lukewarm response, in light of the book and its heroine's place as a perennial childhood favorite. Perhaps I would have loved Madeline, rather than just liking her, if I'd first met her as a girl myself...?
  • (4/5)
    When Madeline is showing off and ends up falling off a ledge into a canal, she is saved by a dog! The girls name it Genevive, and take it home. The school officials find out about the dog, and force them to get rid of it. The girls and Miss Clavel search all over for the dog, but they do not find it. The dog ended up coming home on its own, and to everyone's surprise, it had puppies! There were enough for every girl to have one.
  • (4/5)
    Madeline's Rescue is great for talking about animals. The dog runs away and comes home on his own, so it ends on a happy note. The students will love the story line and the pictures from around Paris.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. I liked the big idea of the book, which is mainly making sure to follow directions, and also learning how to share with others. The first big idea is demonstrated multiple times, such as when Madeline doesn't listen to Miss Clavel and falls off the bridge into the river, and when the people who own the boarding house declare that the dog must be sent away because it isn't allowed in the house. Another thing I liked was the additional characters that were added to further the plot, like the dog and the trustees who own the boarding house. I felt that they were incorporated nicely and built off of the foundation of the first Madeline book. Finally, I continue to enjoy Bemelmans' illustrations. They match up with the text on the page, and continue to show the feelings and personalities of the characters. For example, the trustees are drawn with having canes, top hats, and furs, along with pointy noses, which clearly conveys an air of assumed importance and condescension on their part. Being drawn this way makes it evident that they are not friends of the girls or Miss Clavel.
  • (4/5)
    This is one of those classics that's fun to revisit. The story is fun (at the beginning of the story, the dog saves the girl, and at the end, the dog has puppies!), and the illustrations are cute.
  • (5/5)
    Its a really cute book about Madeline loosing her dog and then she finds it at the end and it has had puppies. It would be a good book to read in class because it rhymes, which helps the students follow along easier
  • (5/5)
    Madeline's Rescue shows all qualities for what a picture book should be. Reading this book could be done in one of two ways, words with pictures, or just pictures. These illustrations of Madeline's Rescue give extreme detail to a simple sentence, therefore making the picture that the reader had in mind a small comparison to what is actually shown. With the simple structure of these pictures, it explains the entire story without needing the words. Every picture in Madeline's Rescue has so much detail put with only a couple of words. The words do not create a vivid and descriptive picture in the readers mind, but the illustrations give more to the words themselves. This books gives more meaning with the pictures on the pages. The illustrator understood that seeing certain pictures and imagining them in your own mind are not one in the same, therefore creating two completely different stories with the words and then with the pictures. "They went looking high". (Bemelmans, 1953) These words allow the reader to paint a simple picture of these little girls and Miss Clavel searching for the lost dog, looking in high places. The detailed picture shows these little girls and their teacher looking in odd places, behind a machine, down an alley, and in some windows. Just this one picture allows the reader to create our own story. Not only are they just looking high, the surroundings are so much more complex then what was stated it the simple text. There are lots of buildings with windows, flowers on top of roofs, there is also a large capital in the background. The girls and Miss Clavel continue looking onto the next page where it simply says "and low" (Bemelmans, 1953) Simple text, with no details in the words, doesn't allow you to fully grasp the idea that the writer wanted. The pictures on the other hand, give a new meaning to the words that were written. In Madeline's Rescue these pictures give more meaning, feeling, and depth into the story line. The girls and Miss Clavel are now in a market, surrounded by lots of people, shopping, selling, and looking. They are in a large tunnel with a lot going on and a tremendous amount of movement. This picture could tell its own story, have its own theme. The meaning of a picture book, is for the pictures to give readers more explanation then the words on the page. Illustrators want to instill their own vision of what is happening into the readers minds. Anyone who looks through a book with pictures should be able to understand the nature of the story just by flipping through. Madeline's Rescue does all of these things, there are no need for words, as you can understand the story all on its on with just pictures.I love all the pictures in this book. It is a great book to read aloud and every time you read it, you will see something new. Kids would enjoy picking out things they see.
  • (5/5)
    Madeline is one of 12 girls in a Paris boarding school. One day, when the girls are out for a walk, Madeline falls into the water. A stray dog saves her life then comes to live with the girls at the school.
  • (3/5)
    This story is about Madeline who saves a dog. Madeline live in an orphanage and takes the dog home. It's all about how her and the other orphans adventure in keeping the dog. This book would be very good for anyone who loves Paris.
  • (5/5)
    Madeline loves to prank and scare Miss Clavel, and this backfires when Madeline falls in the river. A dog, later named Genevieve, saves Madeline. The girls smuggle the dog in their room, but the inspectors pay a visit to the school and tell the girls they can't keep the dog. Miss Clavel finds a way for the girls to keep the dog, but they have to learn to share and not fight over Genevieve. This becomes easy when Genevieve has puppies! This book didn't end like the other Madeline books, but it was just as good! Love it!
  • (3/5)
    Classic. Nice bouncy flow when reading. Illustrations are playful and childish. Appropriate for a beginning reader. Simple, fun read of a timeless classic.
  • (5/5)
    A second book to the famous Madeline, where the girls adopt a dog!
  • (3/5)
    Summary:Madeline doesn't listen to directions from adults and falls off a bridge, but a dog saves her. The girls keep the dog and fight over who it belongs to. The girls have to get rid of the dog because of an inspection. But, they finally find the dog and it has pups, so now each girl has their own dog. Personal Reaction:It shows the importance of listening to adults. Also, I think little girls would love this book!Extension #1:I would use this as a way to teach respect. Because it illustrate the reasons why kids should listen to and respect adults. Extension #2:I would have the students journal about their favorite pet!
  • (1/5)
    Summary-Madeline falls off a bridge and a dog saves her.Then all the girls at the school want to keep the dog so they do.The school gets inspected and they get in trouble for having the dog,and have to get rid of it.They look and look for the dog finally it comes back and has puppies and the girls each have their own dog.Personal Reaction-The Madeline books are very good and educational for little girls.They teach little life lessons.I think all girls should read them.Classroom Extension 1-I would talk to them about listening to their elders because they are there to help you.Classroom Extension 2- Maybe have a lesson about dogs!
  • (3/5)
    This story tells of a young girl living in what seems to be an orphanage and one day falls in the water. She is saved by a dog who begins to live at the orphange. The dog seems smart, but the people who are in charge of the orphanage say she must go. The girls of the orphanage look everywhere for the dog, but can't find her. Later that night the dog is outside and she comes to live in the orphange again, but soon has puppies so each girl has a little dog of her own.This would be an entertaining book to read to young children.
  • (4/5)
    During a walk that Madeline and the girls take Madeline falls off a bridge into the water. A dog saves her and the girls decide to take the dog home and keep her. They treated her as if she was another one of the girls. Then Lord Cucuface comes for inspection and kicks the dog out. After he leaves the girls go searching for the dog. They did not find her and went back home. She came home that night and later the same night had puppies, one for each girl to have their own.I personally have always liked Madeline. I think it's a good book for children to read or just imagine the story by looking at the pictures. It's a perfect book for the Caldecott award, because the illistration is very bright and colors change with mood of story.In class i would maybe do something with my kids like a pets day. I'd have students bring in pictures of their pets and share them. I might also have them do an art project and make a picture of their animals.
  • (4/5)
    The story starts out with the dog saving Madeline from drowning. They keep her and name her Genevieve. All the girls want her. The dog is thrown out by trustees during inspection. They go look for her and find the Genevieve. Girls fight over her. Genevieve has puppies and enough for all the girls.Good story about how we can care about pets.A teacher can use this to show how helpful pets can be mentally and physically. Caring for them can be like a family member.
  • (4/5)
    Classic story that takes adults back to their childhood, and young readers into Madeline's world of the orphanage. The stories are neat and short allowing for the reader to maintain the information of what they have read.
  • (5/5)
    This book contains beautiful illustrations, and I would definitely read it to my students. It rhymes, so it flows well and can be predictable, and it also has a very cute ending that students will enjoy.
  • (4/5)
    Madeline falls into the water and is saved from drowning by a dog, who soon becomes the pet at Mrs. Clavelle's. The nasty trustees kick the dog out, however, much to all the girls' distress. Geniveve the dog returns, with a surprise- puppies! Now all the girls have a puppy to share!
  • (3/5)
    A classic, but just okay for me.
  • (3/5)
    Madline and her eleven school mates continue to live with Miss Clavel, where every day, rain or shine, they line up in twos and walk out into the city. This time Madeline falls into the river, and is rescued by a dog, whom the girls name Genevieve and take back to the school to live with them.Charming story. Bright, colorful, humorous drawings. There’s a reason these books have remained popular for generations of children. It didn’t really appeal to me very much, but I can certainly see how young girls, in particular, would love Madeline and her escapades.
  • (5/5)
    Madeline’s Recue is a story I remember reading as a young child and I also remember there being a show as well. This was another book that was hard to pick from because the illustrator did a good job with the pictures to show what was going on in the story. I didn’t even have to read the text and I understood every page. Ludwig Bemelmans does a good job using the different techniques of design. The only reason I didn’t choose this book over Tops and Bottoms was because the pictures weren’t as real.
  • (4/5)
    Madeline lives with 11 other girls and one adult. Every day they take a walk. Madeline is a bit mischievous and ends up falling off a bridge. A brave dog rescues her. The dog, Genevieve, is kicked out by the trustees during an inspection. The girls and Miss Clavel go out looking for her but have no luck. Genevieve comes back to the house later that night and the girls fight over who she will sleep in bed with. That night she has 12 puppies, so every girl gets one. I used to watch the Madeline shows on television when I was younger and my grandma would read the Madeline books to me. In a way I can relate to Madeline because I have two sisters and out of all of them I was always off doing my own thing, just like Madeline. In the classroom, we could have a safety day and talk about how important it is to listen to adults and do what we’re told so we don’t get hurt like Madeline did. Also, I could have the students each tell us about their pet (if they have one) and what their responsibility is with the pet.