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How to Be a Woman

How to Be a Woman

Написано Caitlin Moran

Озвучено Caitlin Moran


How to Be a Woman

Написано Caitlin Moran

Озвучено Caitlin Moran

оценки:
4/5 (189 оценки)
Длина:
8 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Sep 25, 2012
ISBN:
9780062250131
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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Описание


Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven't been burned as witches since 1727, life isn't exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions: Why are they supposed to get Brazilians? Why do bras hurt? Why the incessant talk about babies? And do men secretly hate them?




Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women's lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own, from the riot of adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother. With rapier wit, Moran slices right to the truth whether it's about the workplace, strip clubs, love, fat, abortion, popular entertainment, or children to jump-start a new conversation about feminism. With humor, insight, and verve, How To Be a Woman lays bare the reasons why female rights and empowerment are essential issues not only for women today but also for society itself.

Издатель:
Издано:
Sep 25, 2012
ISBN:
9780062250131
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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Также доступно как книгеКниге

Об авторе

Caitlin Moran’s debut book, How to Be a Woman, was an instant New York Times bestseller. Her first novel, How to Build a Girl, received widespread acclaim. She lives in London. You can follow Caitlin on Twitter: @caitlinmoran


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4.0
189 оценки / 114 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    Have you ever read a book that made you blush? Well this one did!! So, I quickly decided that I was only listening to this audio in the car, ALONE, and as I loosened up a bit I found myself completely laughing out loud. (You HAVE to get the audio!) Let's be real. The Brits, for all their prim and properness, take everyday life and sex to new levels of honesty. I mean I doubled my anatomical slang vocabulary!! But Moran has a serious side, too, and time and again, she makes very insightful comments. (Which is an argument for print, so you can make note of these passages, something I was unable to do while driving.) Topics include but are not limited to: feminism, childbirth, waxing, abortion, periods, dating, marriage, etc. And men--don't shy away from this one--it could be exactly what you need to understand the other sex! I highly recommend this book.
  • (2/5)
    Moran is funny, smart, and has a way with words. We actually have a lot in common in terms of interests and social groups and I think she would be a hoot to hang out with, on occasion. Many of us know someone like her, someone who with their presence fills the room with energy and mirth but who thinks she knows everything by dint of being her (not through study.) That person is very quick to judge those who don't live by her rules. That person is fun as all get out, until you get exhausted and just can't muster the energy to stay with the tone she sets and/or you realize she is talking out of her ass, and is utterly wrong about many many things which she states as fact, not opinion. The thing is, she is right about those things AS THEY APPLY TO HER but she is blustery and fully confident that she is right about how everyone in the worlds should live-- full stop. It gets really old. In Moran world you are a ridiculous anti-feminist ruled by men if you wear heels -- unless you are a drag queen in which case it is the best thing that has ever happened in the world. Strip clubs are dens of iniquity and women within them all are victims who clearly should not be allowed to make their own decisions about sex work. (In what was for me the oddest passage in the book she bolsters this argument by saying you know strip clubs are bad because gay men don't do things that are harmful to women and gay men would never go to clubs to objectify the young and pretty. What?! Does she know any gay men? I have been in a whole lot of clubs that featured boys in cages, boys swinging their anally inserted pony tails, boys on poles, etc. Also, I have had gay bosses who were super happy with the patriarchy and delighted to perpetuate it to the lasting harm of women. What world does she live in?) If you don't actually think about anything Moran says she is enjoyable. I wish she would spend more time thinking things though and coming to a logical conclusion instead of finding a permutation that endorses her world view and blinding herself to any flaws in the argument. She would be pretty awesome if she did that.
  • (3/5)
    Not bad but very uneven. I found the early biographic part interesting but a bit slow. The bit about motherhood in the middle came off as sanctimonious in the first part and a sample of unaddressed cognitive dissonance in the second. The last 40% of the book was the best for me. While still following her life, the writing became much more analytical. She finally has something to share that is with seeking out. And then it's over.
  • (5/5)
    The most important thing to know about this book is that it probably won’t be what you expect. I was surprised by things including: Caitlin Moran’s frank discussions of all aspects of being a woman; how she defined feminism; and how completely and totally hilarious some of this book was. All of her philosophical musings on feminism and being a woman are tied together very nicely by stories she shares of her life. These are both the funniest bits and the thing that imposes chronological order on what would otherwise be a series of distinct essays. For a good idea of the topics and the tone of the book, I’d recommend the goodreads summary.I don’t have a ton to say about this one except that I loved it. There was at least one chapter that I spent completely breathless I was laughing so hard. Nearly every page there was something so funny or paragraph that expressed something I’d felt so perfectly, that I wanted to run and share the book with someone immediately. I definitely wouldn’t share it with just anyone though, as the language often well beyond what most people would be comfortable using in front of their grandmother.I should also mention for those of you scared off by a book about feminism, that the author’s brand of feminism certainly didn’t conform to my stereotypes. To me, feminism mostly sounds out-dated, largely because I’ve been fortunate enough to never encounter discrimination in the work place. However, I think she makes some very sound arguments that feminism is still both good and necessary. Obviously you can decide how you feel about it yourself, but I don’t think anyone would deny her arguments are compellingly written and thought provoking. I don’t know if a male reader would find it as enjoyable or interesting as I did though, so if you know of a good review by a male reader or are a male reader who’s read the book, please share!
  • (2/5)
    It takes a fair bit of nerve to write a book called how to be a woman. Especially when said woman can really only represent (to a slight degree at that) how to be a white woman.

    I read the book before become aware of Ms. Moran's views on intersectionality (apparently she doesn't think it's necessary, and dismisses suggestions to include a broader viewpoint in writing - see her comments on her interview with Lena Dunham). She also uses trans* phobic language. Not a good role model.

    That said, there were parts of the book I found to be entertaining. It was a fast read. I just wish I hadn't spent money supporting someone with her views on feminism.
  • (4/5)
    I found this both entertaining and thought-provoking, which is a pretty great combination. I knock off a star only because a few of the Britishisms were over my head, so I think a little more effort could have been undertaken to translate or explain certain things for the American market.

    But on the whole, Caitlin Moran is fierce, funny, unafraid to make fun of herself, but also eager to pass along actual life lessons by doing so. The best part is, those life lessons don't sound preachy or cliche or dull; they ring with common sense and reasonableness.
  • (4/5)
    Hilarious and to the point about some things that traditional books on feminism tend to dance around.
  • (3/5)
    Hmm, I love Caitlin Moran's fiction books. My love for How to be Famous spurred me to buy this, mostly to find out how much her real life compared to the fiction she was writing. (I feel like It's actually very very close to her real life - which I like to think is her letting us in on fantastic crazy secrets. 😉) The thing is, where I felt like How to be Famous was a raucous feminist ride, this felt a little less funny and a bit preachy, at least in the second half of the book. That being said, this book is FUNNY. So, probably, try it. Has anyone else read both of these books? How did they compare for you?
  • (4/5)
    How to Be a Woman is hilarious! Caitlin describes various aspects of womanhood using her experiences and humorous insight. I don't know much about her career as a journalist, but I have read her novel and enjoyed it. She has a way of writing about women's issues in a witty, sarcastic and funny way. She makes a lot of great points, but going in you have keep in mind these are her opinions and it's okay to disagree, she even acknowledges this is how she feels wtf does she know kind of thing. I agreed with a lot, but I thought she was a bit insensitive to other cultures. How is someone not familiar with a groups customs going to suggest something is sexist without understanding it? You just can't. I enjoyed the parts of her sharing her own experiences and liked her insights and how she was able to add humor to it.
  • (4/5)
    Entertainingly funny. How can one not enjoy reading about feminism and womanhood while laughing?
  • (3/5)
    Tip: Do not read this book in bed at night while your spouse is sleeping. Apparently laughing hysterically will shake the bed and wake said spouse...The section on child rearing was my favorite. I laughed A LOT! This is the quote that woke my husband up in the middle of the night."Nothing is impossible anymore. One thing's for sure: by the time your child is two years old, you will look back at what you were like before you had a child and regard yourself as a weak, spineless, dandified, pampered, ineffectual, shallow time-wasting dilettante.Every parent has their particular moment where they realize that, since they've had a child, nothing really fazes them anymore. For me, it was the day that potty-training Lizzie went wrong, and I had to kick a poo across a falconry display in a marquee at Regent's Park Zoo. I had the left foot of Beckham, the icy composure of Audrey Hepburn on a catwalk, and the quick-thinking disposal nous of whoever it was that first thought of entombing radioactive material in concrete."
  • (4/5)
    How to Be a Woman is hilarious! Caitlin describes various aspects of womanhood using her experiences and humorous insight. I don't know much about her career as a journalist, but I have read her novel and enjoyed it. She has a way of writing about women's issues in a witty, sarcastic and funny way. She makes a lot of great points, but going in you have keep in mind these are her opinions and it's okay to disagree, she even acknowledges this is how she feels wtf does she know kind of thing. I agreed with a lot, but I thought she was a bit insensitive to other cultures. How is someone not familiar with a groups customs going to suggest something is sexist without understanding it? You just can't. I enjoyed the parts of her sharing her own experiences and liked her insights and how she was able to add humor to it.
  • (3/5)
    I was pleasantly suprised by this book. Its no Vagina Monologues, but I wasn't really expecting it to be. Instead it is a book on feminism which isn't aimed at women who already identify themselves as feminists, but at all those ones who should be identifying themselves as feminists. A mainstream book to get more women on board to a cause that no one should be off board about in the first place!

    Its laugh out loud funny, its incredibly honest in parts, and it brings in a lot of British cutural and pop references. I really enjoyed that aspect, as a lot of the feminist websites I read come from an American angle...so I don't usually relate that much to that aspect of them.

    She manages to discuss feminism in a really accessible way, which I think is vital in showing your every day woman (& man!) that being a feminist isn't a negative thing, but something that should come natural to any woman who respects herself & any man who respects women. Anyone who can bring that message to the masses is good in my book!
  • (4/5)
    The language can be kind of rough, so for the sensitive who seek greater understanding of women's issues in the 21st century and suspect that women may be actually losing ground on some social fronts, I suggest you read something else unremittingly hilarious and brutally honest, with unquestionable feminist bona fides. Actually, you'd better just put up with the language, because there are no other books like this. About 95% of it my reaction is simply: somebody had to say it.
  • (5/5)
    Part memoir, Moran discusses life and difficulties as a modern woman. The memories of growing up as one of eight children in a poor Northern family are hilarious, and the basis for the tv show Raised by Wolves, written by Moran and her sister.Moran became a tv presenter and newspaper columnist who hangs out with pop stars and celebrities, but she compares the difference between being female in the last generations to now. She discusses what is expected from women, the difference money makes, aging, motherhood and choosing not to be a mother. Wound through these topics are stories of her own life involving siblings, un-reciprocated love, break-ups and her workplace reputation.
  • (3/5)
    I found myself agreeing with most of what she says - "are the men having to do this do?" If not, then it's cobblers. I did get a bit bored at some sections though.
  • (4/5)
    I was nodding my head (in a rueful manner) all the way through this. I love Caitlin Moran's attitude to life and to women's lives in particular. I read that advice column in The Times about pubic hair and was similarly horrified by the advice given: I was delighted that she wrote about that in this book - I've often thought about it and now I don't have to write about it myself!

    Moran is refreshing, shouty, rude and funny and I applaud her wholeheartedly for pouring out her views in this book.
  • (3/5)
    I laughed out loud many times and have had deep, life reckoning thoughts and internal conversation as well. Great, honest writing.
  • (5/5)
    a humorous portrayal of the extent to which male cultural bias still impedes women in the UK, with simple examples of how humans (wherever they are on the gender spectrum) could stop disempowering those women
  • (5/5)
    This was great. Hilarious and honest. Highly recommend for women to read
  • (5/5)
    Moran is hilarious, beautifully uncomfortable at times, and enlightening so that you start to understand your own idea of being a woman a little bit better.
  • (2/5)
    First things first, having The Caitlin Moran narrate her own book made the experience so much better. Therefore, I have nothing to say about the CAPS thing, although I can see where they are coming from. But I must admit, I quite enjoyed the narration, even though when she was screaming.
    Regarding the book itself, I think I had the wrong expectations. I came thinking it was a mix between a non-fiction book about feminism and the memoirs of Caitlin Moran. And in a sense, it might be. And yes, Caitlin Moran is a feminist and talks about feminism throughout the book. However, I think many things were rather insubstantial. Like the chapter about naming breasts and vaginas. As a woman, I don't think I've ever spared a single second to think about this.
    As a whole, I'm left with mixed feelings. Yes, some discussions left me thinking for a while. But others did nothing for me. And I'm sorry to say this, but some parts of the book simply bored me.
    I'm not saying it's a must-read. But I wouldn't say it's a bad read either. The only thing I'd say is that you should be aware of your expectations and what you're looking for when deciding to read this book or not.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic how did I live my long feminist boomer life without her. She made me think, laugh, think and laugh som more. Thank you Caitlin.
  • (3/5)
    While I really enjoyed the first part of the book, the latter parts are not as good. When Moran describes her growing up, entering puberty, discovering feminism, that's good and often funny, but when she starts namedropping without reason, tells her story about partying with Lady Gaga and how having a child changed her, I just wanted the book to be over.

    All in all: there are important and funny bits in here, and it's quite easy to sift through the book, but it should have been edited better.
  • (5/5)
    Essential for men and women alike in the 21st century!
  • (4/5)
    Caitlin Moran tells the true story of her life, and how she learned how to be a woman.Moran is one of those brilliant authors who can make you think, tug on your heartstrings, and then have you laughing uproariously (out loud on a bus, in my case).This is another book that, like in the previous review, suffers a bit from comparison. We are lucky enough to have so many brilliant, funny women writing their truth, that there are a lot of excellent books out there in this same genre Moran is writing in. To me, I still prefer Jenny Lawson and Tina Fey, but that doesn't mean I can't still really like what Moran is doing here. This is one of those books it just feels really important to read, given everything going on in the world right now--and it's an enjoyable read too.
  • (5/5)
    This was amazing!!!!
  • (5/5)
    How to Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran was the April book from the feminist book club on Goodreads called Our Shared Shelf started by Emma Watson. I am continually thankful for this book group as it has really opened my horizons to some truly fantastic and interesting books that I don't know I would have necessarily picked up on my own. I had heard SO much about this book in particular that I was starting to wonder if it was fated for me to read it. Yes, I have definitely fallen under Caitlin Moran's spell. I challenge anyone to read this book and not think she's the epitome of awesomeness. The basic premise of this book is that Caitlin feels that she has never truly known how to be a "woman" in all the ways that society/family/ourselves tell us are the defining characteristics of a "woman". She talks about growing up in a family of 8 as the oldest in a very poor household and her journey in discovering her place in feminism. However, it was her no-holds-barred satirical take on the pitfalls of trying to mold ourselves to fit one perfect mold that made me truly love this book. 10/10 highly recommendPS This is definitely an adult book. So be prepared.
  • (5/5)
    Please can Caitlin be my new best friend. Part-autobiography and part rant about what it is to be a modern woman. Funny, honest, revealing; an enjoyable read. And I'm glad I'm not the only one who doesn't understand high heels and designer handbags.
  • (5/5)
    Powerful! I highly recommend this to anyone with feelings about feminism. The cheeky style kept me laughing.