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Coraline

Coraline

Написано Neil Gaiman

Озвучено Neil Gaiman


Coraline

Написано Neil Gaiman

Озвучено Neil Gaiman

оценки:
4.5/5 (1,369 оценки)
Длина:
3 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Nov 11, 2003
ISBN:
9780060735562
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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Примечание редактора

Delightfully dark…

Delightfully dark, Neil Gaiman’s tale of the curious, brave, and clever Coraline is sinister and suspenseful, yet filled with quirky charm. With the author’s own narration of his novella, the unforgettable Coraline comes to vivid life.

Описание

The day after they moved in,
Coraline went exploring....

In Coraline's family's new flat are twenty-one windows and fourteen doors. Thirteen of the doors open and close.

The fourteenth is locked, and on the other side is only a brick wall, until the day Coraline unlocks the door to find a passage to another flat in another house just like her own.

Only it's different.

At first, things seem marvelous in the other flat. The food is better. The toy box is filled with wind-up angels that flutter around the bedroom, books whose pictures writhe and crawl and shimmer, little dinosaur skulls that chatter their teeth. But there's another mother, and another father, and they want Coraline to stay with them and be their little girl. They want to change her and never let her go.

Other children are trapped there as well, lost souls behind the mirrors. Coraline is their only hope of rescue. She will have to fight with all her wits and all the tools she can find if she is to save the lost children, her ordinary life, and herself.

Critically acclaimed and award-winning author Neil Gaiman will delight readers with his first novel for all ages.

Издатель:
Издано:
Nov 11, 2003
ISBN:
9780060735562
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге


Об авторе

NEIL GAIMAN was awarded the Newbery and Carnegie Medals for The Graveyard Book. His other books for younger readers include Coraline (which was made into an Academy-Award-nominated film) and The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish (which wasn’t). Born in England, he has won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards. You can learn more at www.mousecircus.com.

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Что люди думают о Coraline

4.4
1369 оценки / 371 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    Easy and quick read. Short story. A fun, and dark children literature.
  • (3/5)
    I know this is written for children, but even knowing that, this book was still just too fantastical and yet flat at the same time. However, both of my granddaughters love it. (Ages 8 and 12) There are parallel worlds that collide and Coraline must work to get her "real" parents back. 208 pages
  • (5/5)
    All of Gaiman's novels so far have been delightful, and this one is no exception. Coraline is putatively aimed at a younger market, the eight and up crowd, but that's no reason for an adult not to sneak into the children's section and pick it up anyway.

    Coraline Jones and her family have just moved into a flat in a big, old house. Two of the other flats are occupied, one by "the crazy old man" who tells her that he's training his mouse circus to perform for her, but the mice aren't ready yet, and the other by two old women, Miss Spink and Miss Forcible, retired actresses who keep some indeterminate number of aging Highland terriers. There's a fourth flat, that's still empty. There's a door in the drawing room of the Jones' flat that used to lead into the part of the house that's now the fourth, empty, flat, but now it only leads to the brick wall that was put up to divide the building when it was broken up into flats. However, there is still a key that unlocks that door to the brick wall.

    With all the adults around her affectionate but distracted--the retired actresses and the crazy old man even consistently call her Caroline, rather than Coraline--Coraline decides to explore. Her exploring leads her to try that door to the brick wall again, and this time there isn't a brick wall. There's a corridor, and Coraline goes down that corridor, and finds her "other mother" making lunch. Her "other mother" and "other father" are attentive, her other bedroom has a more interesting color scheme (though she privately concedes she wouldn't really want to sleep in the green and pink room.) There are pet rats, who sing a nasty little song, and a chestful of toys that seem strangely alive.

    When she goes outside, the neighborhood cat, whom she has been unable even to get close to, talks to her, and warns her to be careful.

    Everyone she meets, except the cat, has black button eyes.

    Coraline, being a sensible child, decides to go back to her own flat, despite the urging of her other mother to stay, and to allow her other mother to sew on her black button eyes so that she can stay forever. But when Coraline gets back to her own side, her parents are missing, and they don't come home, and she can't get anyone to take her seriously when she tells them her parents are missing--except the cat. Gradually, she realizes what has happened, and what she needs to do. This is a nicely scary little book. Strongly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    A sweet quick read, andif already sewn the movie, so no surprises. It's inventive and a little spooky but very charming, and I love Coraline's plucky exploration.
  • (4/5)
    Delightfully creepy. It took a few chapters to really grab me, but since I had seen the movie when it first came out in 2009 and had enjoyed that so much, I stuck with it. A very wise choice on my part.The book rounds Coraline out a lot more than the movie did. The film changed a few things from the book, most notably adding an entirely new character: Wybie. This is the second book I've read by Gaiman. He is incredibly talented at building suspense and delivering. I was honestly creeped out a few times by the vibe that Gaiman holds steady throughout the book. Also adding to the eeriness are some wonderful illustrations by Dave McKean sprinkled throughout the book. One of my favorite parts of the book was when Coraline retells the story of when her father sacrificed himself for her by choosing to be stung by several wasps while letting her run ahead so that she would be safe. The story illustrated that her father *did* love her (a fact not necessarily evident in the earlier chapters) and that Coraline understood how much her father loved her. The story ends with a line that perfectly sums up one of the main lessons in the book and one of the better quotes from the book: "When you're scared but you still do it anyway, that's brave."This book also had some fun, dark humor that I enjoyed. When trying to convince Coraline of her trustworthiness, The Other Mother swears on her mother's grave. Coraline asks if her mother has a grave: "Oh yes," said the other mother. "I put her in there myself. And when I found her trying to crawl out, I put her back."This was a quick, enjoyable read. Some children may find it too scary, but I know that when I was around 3rd or 4th grade, I would have probably loved this!Side note: I tried rewatching Coraline after reading the book. I couldn't finish it. I found Coraline's character insufferable after growing to love the book version of her. Perhaps I'll try it again after giving myself some time.
  • (4/5)
    This is a sort of marvelously creepy work, and I loved how understated the threats were in the beginning, and then the way Gaiman built upon the tension as things became more sinister. All told, I prefer his adult work, but I'd still recommend this as well worth exploring.
  • (3/5)
    I've decided that I prefer the movie over the book. In the book, I didn't sense Coraline's distaste towards her parents, which plays a huge part. Also, the movie is more creative in many aspects. The book does has some interesting concepts though.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book! It is a great read for children, teens, and adults alike.
  • (3/5)
    This is a cute (scary) story, I enjoyed it, but it's not one of my favourite Gaiman novels. I have such good memories of The Graveyard Book, but I'm wondering if that's because I read it so long ago.

    Anyway, good read!
  • (4/5)
    Wonderfully whimsical tale that once again shows Gaiman's marvellous use of the strange and absurd to deliver commentary on the mundane and ordinary things in everyday life.
  • (4/5)
    it was scary...
  • (3/5)
    Spooky and weird!
  • (4/5)
    Delightfully creepy..
  • (5/5)
    An incredible tale of surrealism and deceit, Coraline is a literary masterpiece.
  • (4/5)
    I originally watched the movie, and must admit, I was lost, and didn't much care for it. Then my daughter had to read it for reading class, and my reading group decided to read it for the book of the month. It was a good read, and I understand the movie better now, in fact, I would like to watch the movie again.
  • (4/5)
    Such a delightful story!! Obviously, it's a bit dark, maybe not for every young person, but it's wonderful in it's darkness. Not so much you'll have nightmares, but enough that you might tilt your head and question the next black cat you see? Coraline is a young girl bored in her new apartment. She finds a door in the parlor that sometimes leads to a brick wall and sometimes to a very dark, very foreboding hallway. Being that she's feeling a bit ignored by her parents and doesn't have new neighborhood friends to occupy her, she goes exploring down said scary hallway. At the end she finds her house, her parents and her quirky neighbors, though they're all a little "off". She soon discovers there is an evil lurking in this other place and set out on a brave quest to rescue her real parents, 3 children she doesn't really know and herself from the clutches of her "other mother". I found this all very entertaining, though I expect nothing less from Mr. Gaiman.
  • (5/5)
    Curiously terrifying.
  • (5/5)
    creepy...but satisfying.
  • (4/5)
    CoralineEntertaining 4 starsA fun and creepy quick read (161 pages). In short, Coraline discovers a sinister world behind a door in her new house. Her bravery helps save her and her parents. The book reminded me of The Ocean At The End Of The Lane, another of Gaiman's great books. If you're not a fan of fantasy, this book will change your mind. I'd recommend it to people of all ages.
  • (4/5)
    Delightfully creepy. It took a few chapters to really grab me, but since I had seen the movie when it first came out in 2009 and had enjoyed that so much, I stuck with it. A very wise choice on my part.The book rounds Coraline out a lot more than the movie did. The film changed a few things from the book, most notably adding an entirely new character: Wybie. This is the second book I've read by Gaiman. He is incredibly talented at building suspense and delivering. I was honestly creeped out a few times by the vibe that Gaiman holds steady throughout the book. Also adding to the eeriness are some wonderful illustrations by Dave McKean sprinkled throughout the book. One of my favorite parts of the book was when Coraline retells the story of when her father sacrificed himself for her by choosing to be stung by several wasps while letting her run ahead so that she would be safe. The story illustrated that her father *did* love her (a fact not necessarily evident in the earlier chapters) and that Coraline understood how much her father loved her. The story ends with a line that perfectly sums up one of the main lessons in the book and one of the better quotes from the book: "When you're scared but you still do it anyway, that's brave."This book also had some fun, dark humor that I enjoyed. When trying to convince Coraline of her trustworthiness, The Other Mother swears on her mother's grave. Coraline asks if her mother has a grave: "Oh yes," said the other mother. "I put her in there myself. And when I found her trying to crawl out, I put her back."This was a quick, enjoyable read. Some children may find it too scary, but I know that when I was around 3rd or 4th grade, I would have probably loved this!Side note: I tried rewatching Coraline after reading the book. I couldn't finish it. I found Coraline's character insufferable after growing to love the book version of her. Perhaps I'll try it again after giving myself some time.
  • (5/5)
    What an amazing story. Told from the point of view of a young girl, this is a tale about courage and defining what kind of world she wants to live in. The language and way of thinking are captured perfectly and the way that Coraline reasons her way out of a dangerous situation is quite ingenious. I loved it.
  • (5/5)
    Coraline is textbook Gaiman: a fantastical adventure with its fair share of creepy. A compact horror/fantasy novella that'll make you rethink buttons forever.
  • (3/5)
    Deliciously creepy, ever so twisted. The Adams Family meets Alice in Wonderland
  • (5/5)
    This is a really cute book, in a creepy, dark sort of way. I love that Gaiman chose a girl for the hero, though with all the great children's fantasy adventures centered around girls, I hope there are more books like this for boys, too. After all, girls get this book and the Secret Garden, Alice in Wonderland, Pan's Labyrinth, Mirrormask, and Susan, Lucy, Jill and Polly in the Chronicles of Narnia, and many more. I hope to see lots of creepy button-eyed dolls and spidery white hands in the Halloween stores from now on.
  • (4/5)
    Neil Gaiman has an awesome imagination.
  • (5/5)
    Wow. Let me start off by saying, I didn't think this was a book to be read by children. It's SCARY! But then I read a little afterward by Neil Gaiman, where he explained that this is one of the strangest books he has written...In that, children find it to be adventurous and adults find it to be terrifying. I couldn't agree more on the adult part. I flew through this in no time (yes, it is a short book) mostly because I found it to be scary and a book that I just could not put down.

    Anyone who is a fan of Neil Gaiman, or a fan of scary books, needs to read this whether you're 8, 18, or 80. it's just THAT DARN GOOD.

    I cannot wait to see the movie now, although I'm wondering how frightening that is compared to the book...
  • (4/5)
    A dark, twisted tale about a girl who has to escape a dark, twisted alternative of her own world - and save her own, while she's at it.Not a fan of horror and not a fan of teenage protagonists, but Gaiman caught even me with this little book. The way he describes the horrors Coraline encounterd and how she discovers her own courage and the value of her day-to-day life, that's in all its fairy-tale-like reduction as creepy as believable.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this; but I am a great fan of Neil Gaiman so my critical faculties are somewhat weakened as far as this book is concerned. This is a proper fairy tale right on the tradition of the Brothers Grimm with a resourceful heroine and some nasty bits. As I expected the language flows beautifully; I even caught myself reading parts of it aloud to myself with nobody else around. I have set it aside to read to my seven year old granddaughter who I am sure will enjoy my rendition.
  • (5/5)
    This is definitely a very wild ride of a book. It's creepy and intense and dark, despite being a book which has a children's movie made after it and which (at least with the copy I got from the library) has a cover that looks rather innocent. There was a deep feeling of foreboding and corruption throughout the entire book, right from the start, that I absolutely loved. It had goosebumps along my arms and had me feeling almost like I was being watched even though I was alone and even when I read parts of it in high daylight.I think my favorite things about this book, aside from the fact that it was deliciously frightful, were the idea that being fearless doesn't make you brave but rather doing what's right in the face of your own fear is what is brave. The story Coraline told about her father and the wasps will probably always stick out to me for that, and the running theme of Coraline doing what was right even though she was terrified. The other thing, is that the struggle between Coraline and the bedlam was very much a battle of wits. I liked the fact that instead of having an epic fistfight or swordfight, the two of them engaged in a battle of wits and to the cleverest one go the spoils.I also really enjoyed seeing the difference between the real world and the other world behind the door, which seemed to be a rather mirror world, a world adjacent to the real one with corrupted versions of characters we already knew from the real world. That was very interesting and added to the creep factor by a mile.Definitely an entertaining book that's worth the read, regardless of how old you are, but I also think it's a wonderful book for kids and young adults. It doesn't beat you over the head with them, but there are lessons in the book, things that I think everyone can learn from or of which it wouldn't hurt to be reminded of.
  • (4/5)
    This is probably my favorite Neil Gaiman book - which may say a lot for my level of maturity, but I am hoping says more for the quality of book it is. As enjoyable for adults as it will be for their daughters (and sons, too, I hope). I don't know about you, reader, but I was that sort of girl, and probably still am - the kind who hopes for a secret passage, or a forgotten door, in every new house. Coraline finds one, and discovers a mirror world - the kind of mirror-world you always discover in these cases - where reality is a little bit better until it becomes a whole lot worse. The book is much scarier and more interesting than the movie, particularly because Coraline is on her own, more or less.