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Doctor De Soto

Doctor De Soto

Написано William Steig

Озвучено Stanley Tucci


Doctor De Soto

Написано William Steig

Озвучено Stanley Tucci

оценки:
4.5/5 (21 оценки)
Длина:
16 minutes
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 4, 2011
ISBN:
9781427211194
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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Описание

"Doctor De Soto, the dentist, did very good work." With the aid of his able assistant, Mrs. De Soto, he copes with the toothaches of animals large and small. His expertise is so great that his fortunate patients never feel any pain.

Since he's a mouse, Doctor De Soto refuses to treat "dangerous" animals--that is, animals who have a taste for mice. But one day a fox shows up and begs for relief from the tooth that's killing him. How can the kindhearted De Sotos turn him away? But how can they make sure that the fox doesn't give in to his baser instincts once his tooth is fixed? Those clever De Sotos will find a way.
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 4, 2011
ISBN:
9781427211194
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге


Об авторе

William Steig (1907-2003) was a cartoonist, illustrator and author of award-winning books for children, including Shrek!, on which the DreamWorks movies are based. Steig was born in New York City. Every member of his family was involved in the arts, and so it was no surprise when he decided to become an artist. He attended City College and the National Academy of Design. In 1930, Steig’s work began appearing in The New Yorker, where his drawings have been a popular fixture ever since. He published his first children's book, Roland the Minstrel Pig, in 1968. In 1970, Steig received the Caldecott Medal for Sylvester and the Magic Pebble. His books for children also include Dominic; The Real Thief; The Amazing Bone, a Caldecott Honor Book; Amos & Boris, a National Book Award finalist; and Abel's Island and Doctor De Soto, both Newbery Honor Books. Steig's books have also received the Christopher Award, the Irma Simonton Black Award, the William Allen White Children's Book Award, and the American Book Award. His European awards include the Premio di Letteratura per l'infanzia (Italy), the Silver Pencil Award (the Netherlands), and the Prix de la Fondation de France. On the basis of his entire body of work, Steig was selected as the 1982 U.S. candidate for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for Illustration and subsequently as the 1988 U.S. candidate for Writing. Steig also published thirteen collections of drawings for adults, beginning with About People in 1939, and including The Lonely Ones, Male/Female, The Agony in the Kindergarten, and Our Miserable Life. He died in Boston at the age of 95.


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4.3
21 оценки / 15 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    Love it so much. will read more stories by the author
  • (4/5)
    Clever story here! I like how Dr. DeSoto and his mouse wife outfox the fox--AFTER they help him! Cute!
  • (4/5)
    In a story that is strongly reminiscent of the Aesopic fable concerning the wolf and the crane, murine dentist Dr. De Soto agrees to go against his standing policy, which states that he will not treat dangerous animals (like cats!), and accept a fox as a patient. Correctly interpreting his vulpine patient's desire to eat him, and his assistant (his wife, Mrs. De Soto), the good dentist is torn between his duty as a medical practitioner and his desire to remain in one piece. Fortunately, creative thinking, and a little cunning, allow the mice to outfox the fox, and escape unscathed.Atypically, Dr. De Soto was chosen as a Newbery Honor Book in 1983 - "atypically" because the Newbery is a writer's award, and is usually given to longer works, rather than to picture-books - but although I found the story engaging, and appreciated the interactions of text and image, I can't say that I thought this was a particularly award-worthy title. Still, I did enjoy it, and was charmed by Dr. and Mrs. De Soto, and their sangfroid in the face of danger. Seeing the "little guys" triumph is always fun, especially when the narrative and artwork are so full of humor.
  • (3/5)
    This story was clever and interesting but lacked any sense of theme or positive lesson that child readers could take from it. I enjoyed the character of Doctor De Soto, who is not only intelligent but also willing to put his life on the line to help others in need. I think he sets a good example for child readers to follow. However, the overarching narrative of this story demonstrates that by helping others you may be hurt in the process and should always watch your back. This message, although it reflects some peoples experiences, is not necessarily the best message to give to children. So, as a source of entertaining literature I give two thumbs up, but its message of being overly cautious when helping others I am unsure of.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:This book is about two married mice and the husband is a Dentist, while his wife is his assistant. Together they work on animal’s teeth, except they don’t accept animals that could eat them. One day a fox comes wanting a tooth worked on, and the couple reluctantly let him in. The fox has plans to eat the mice once they’re done fixing his tooth, but in the end of the story the mice outsmart the fox by gluing the fox’s mouth shut.Personal Reaction:I thought this story was cute and very clever. I really enjoyed that the mice fixed the fox’s tooth, knowing they could be eaten, and then tricked the fox so that he couldn’t eat them. I think it would be a fun book to read to a class and I think the kids would enjoy it.Extension Ideas:1) Have the students draw their favorite scene from the book and write a couple of sentences about what they like about it.2) Have the students write in their daily writing journal what they would have done to outsmart the fox instead of gluing his mouth shut.
  • (4/5)
    Doctor Bernard De Soto, assisted by his wife Deborah, treat animals with toothaches. Since they are mice, they don't accept cats and other mice eaters as patients, until a fox in pain appears at their office.
  • (4/5)
    Personal Reaction: This book is about a dentist who is a mouse. He is very careful to treat only aminals who aren't a danger to mice. One day a fox comes to his office with a bad toothache. Dr. De Soto feels bad for the fox so he lets him in. The fox is good while Dr. De Soto pulls his tooth. The mice worry that the fox will harm them the next day when the fox returns for his new tooth. When the fox comes back, the Dr. puts in his new tooth and then puts this stuff in his mouth that keeps it shut. The fox had been outsmarted by the mouse!Personal Reaction: Very cute book! I love when authors use animals as characters in books. I feel like it adds so much more to the story. I also like how the author kept you thinking at the end of the story of what the mouse was going to do to the fox.Classroom Extensions:1. I would have students draw pictures of what animal they would use their dentist (the mouse) and what animal they would use as their patient (the fox).2. I would teach students about their teeth and the importance of cleaning them.
  • (4/5)
    A cute book about how a fox is outsmarted by a mice.
  • (4/5)
    Charming story about a mouse dentist and his wife/assistant who agree to help a fox and then have to outwit him in order to avoid being eaten. It’s satisfying read but I’m kind of surprised about the Newbery Honor—it doesn’t seem quite that amazing of a story to me.
  • (5/5)
    Doctor De Soto is a mouse dentist who treats all size of herbivore, but one day a fox shows up with such a terrible tooth ache the Doc takes pity on him, but then must cleverly avoid becoming dinner when the fox's tooth is fixed. This may be the best Steig book and emphasizes using your head to get out of trouble. Great illustrations filled, but not cluttered, with fun details. Highly recommended for all readers and all collections for children.
  • (5/5)
    I thought this book was incredibly smart and funny. It's about Dr. Desoto, a mouse dentist, and his wife, his assistant. They treat a variety of animals and he's a well known dentist, however, they refuse to treat dangerous animals. One day, a fox comes in with a terrible toothache and they debate about whether or not to treat him. They decide to let him in and they extract his tooth but see that he is tempted to eat them. He needs to come back the next day to get his new tooth and they formulate a plan. After the fox has his work done, they offer him a new treatment that will prevent toothaches forever. He agrees and they paint his teeth with glue so he can't open his mouth for a day or two. They outfox the fox. It's a really cute book and the illustrations are great. I love how William Steig uses animals as characters and he is abl eto give them so much personality.
  • (5/5)
    A kind hearted mouse dentist must decide between his job as a dentist and his role on the food chain when a hurting fox comes to get a tooth fixed. He has to outfox the hungry fox to save his life.Children's fantasy picture bookThis book is terrific. Dr. DeSoto's bickering with his wife leaves me in stitches. He is a terrifically kind animal and does what needs to be done. Hippocratic oath extends to Aesops' world too, i guess. The first grade kids loved this book. I was worried it may have seem dated (Steig has that 1980's feel) but we had a lot of fun with this book, and it's animal protagonist is a classic. He is so civic minded and bright, what a perfect role model.
  • (3/5)
    This is a good example of fantasy. It personifies animals. It gives them real human characteristics which makes them believable, but also gives them characteristics that are similar to their animal-likenesses, like the fox being predatory, which adds to the believability.Age Appropriateness: PrimaryMedia: Watercolor and Ink
  • (4/5)
    Doctor Do Soto is a dentist, but he is also a mouse. When a fox who is in terrible pain comes to Dr. Do Soto, the doctor decides to go ahead and help the fox. By the end of the fox’s treatment, he decides he is going to eat the mouse and his wife, but the doctor has come up with a plan. He knows foxes eat mice, so he tricks the fox and he is unable to open his mouth to eat the mice. This fantasy shows a variety of animals talking and sharing emotions. The events that take place, such as a mouse being a dentist, could never take place in the real world. The story could be used in a classroom for appreciative listening. Children could draw out certain events in the story and compare pictures to see what was meaningful in the story to each student. The setting in this story is necessary for the storyline. The fact the mouse is a dentist makes it appropriate that the setting would take place at a dentist office. The mice also are illustrated as being so small, that when they work on larger animals, they much use a ladder to accommodate. This shows the size of the mice compared to other animals and how vulnerable they are to animals such as a fox. Media: Oil Paints
  • (3/5)
    Cute illustrations, kids would like it.