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Ramona and Her Father

Ramona and Her Father

Написано Beverly Cleary

Озвучено Stockard Channing


Ramona and Her Father

Написано Beverly Cleary

Озвучено Stockard Channing

оценки:
3.5/5 (486 оценки)
Длина:
2 часа
Издатель:
Издано:
5 окт. 2010 г.
ISBN:
9780062060174
Формат:

Описание

When her father loses his job, Ramona decides to help out. Maybe she could earn a million dollars making a TV commercial, or get her father to stop smoking to save money (and his lungs)-she is full of ideas. Some work, some don't. But when her father says he wouldn't trade her for a million dollars, Ramona knows all is right in her world.

Издатель:
Издано:
5 окт. 2010 г.
ISBN:
9780062060174
Формат:

Об авторе

Beverly Cleary is one of America's most beloved authors. As a child, she struggled with reading and writing. But by third grade, after spending much time in her public library in Portland, Oregon, she found her skills had greatly improved. Before long, her school librarian was saying that she should write children's books when she grew up. Instead she became a librarian. When a young boy asked her, "Where are the books about kids like us?" she remembered her teacher's encouragement and was inspired to write the books she'd longed to read but couldn't find when she was younger. She based her funny stories on her own neighborhood experiences and the sort of children she knew. And so, the Klickitat Street gang was born! Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the American Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented to her in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature. Dear Mr. Henshaw won the Newbery Medal, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. Her characters, including Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph, the motorcycle-riding mouse, have delighted children for generations.


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  • (4/5)
    This is one of the only books I've read for children that address the distress that children feel when there are money worries in the family, and manages to do it with a sense of humor. Ramona's father loses his job, and money is tight. Her mother goes to work full-time, but barely makes enough and everyone is stressed out. Ramona, who is about 6 or 7 now, is also unhappy, but not because of a lack of money, but because everyone is grouchy and just not themselves because of it. Cleary is wonderful at depicting the thoughts processes of young kids without getting mired in psychological explanation. Excellent!
  • (4/5)
    Ramona is now in second grade, and life is getting tough at home. Beezus is begging to act like a middle school girl, which frustrates Ramona. But worst of all, her father has lost his job. Her mother begins to work full-time and doesn't have as much time to do other things. Her father meanwhile, has too much time, and is grouch a lot. His mood is not improved when his daughters convince him that he should quit smoking. Of course, everyone is happy in the end.
  • (4/5)
    Ramona Quimby wishes her family would perk up. Her cat refuses to eat, her older sister is going through a moody and defiant phase, and her parents worry a lot these days, since her father just lost his job. But if Ramona sets her mind to it, maybe she can find a way to help her father through this rough patch in Ramona and Her Father by author Beverly Cleary.Just as I remembered from childhood, I found this to be one of the darker Ramona books (although back then, "sadder" is the word I likely would've used.) It's certainly a serious situation for Ramona here, with her family being even more strapped for cash than usual, and her father putting his lungs in danger with cigarettes. (Wow--I'd forgotten all about Ramona's mission against her father's smoking habit! My, does that lead to some parts that prick my heart in a whole new way, now that I can better appreciate how Mr. Quimby must feel.)But there's still patented Ramona humor and fun in the read, with a heroine whose feelings about things like eating out at Whopperburger are so on point. Plus, seeing how an imperfect Mr. Quimby is a good man who loves and gets a kick out of his daughter makes this a winner of a tale.Oh--and did I mention this book's delightfully Christmassy ending?
  • (4/5)
    This was another book that I had not read as a child but had read others in the series. Ramona is still as entertaining now as she was then, but the new (2006) illustrations just do not fit with the 1975 text.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a girl named Ramona. Her father lost his job and her mom works full time every day and comes home and works even more. she has carved a pumpkin but the cat broke it and she had to eat pumpkin every day because she had not alot of food. she wanted to be in the commercals and get alot of money! She also stuck burrs to her hair trying to make a crown out of them.
  • (5/5)
    Ramona's father is out of work, which means he's spending a lot more time at home. Unfortunately, it also means he's feeling a bit more irritable and dejected. But life continues for the Quimby family, and Ramona is always working on something, whether it's finding a way to have a real part in the church nativity play, or launching a campaign to get her father to stop smoking.This is one of my favorite books in the series. The whole thing is just so warm and comforting, like a long hug. It's also a perfect book to read in the fall, as it's set around Halloween through Christmas time.
  • (5/5)
    Its so funny. This is the best book ever. I just love this book
  • (5/5)
    I hate how they have to make a preview and not let me listen to the whole book?but otherwise I love love love this book!
  • (5/5)
    In this book, Ramona's father loses his job and the whole family has to deal with the economic stress. Her mom changes her part-time job to full-time and her dad gets really grumpy. She and her sister also convince her dad to stop smoking.I think this book does a beautiful job of portraying how economic stress can affect children. The parents are portrayed really realistically, and Ramona's interpretations of the issue and her worries about Christmas and food and losing the house. I love the interactions between the family members and I think Cleary does a beautiful job of creating a realistic family. Ramona is always hilarious and this is another well-loved book.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: Ramona's father loses his job, causing Ramona's mother to have to go to work. This makes the whole family sad. Ramona and her sister try to figure out a plan that will make their dad stop smoking. In the end, the family learns that even though they will face hard times, they can over come anything as long as they stick together.Personal Reflection: This book had a great meaning of family for children. It also had a very positive ending that will encourage children to keep their heads up no matter the issue.Extensions:1. do not give up2. Hard times3. Staying positive
  • (5/5)
    The genre of this book is realistic fiction. When Ramona's father loses his job, her mother has to work full time, and everythings seems to go wrong. Even when her family is upset, Ramona tries to always cheer them up, even when she does silly things. Nonetheless, her father still loves her, no matter what, and Ramona finds that she is very lucky to have a family like hers.
  • (4/5)
    I sadly deprived myself of Beverly Cleary books as a child, so I'm making up for lost time.  In this Ramona Quimby book, her father is laid off meaning that Ramona spends more time than usual with her father at home.  There are a lot of sweet father-daughter moments that touch me as a daddy myself.  But Ramona's father can also be cranky and short-tempered, especially from being unemployed and forced to quit smoking by his daughters.  It's a funny and timeless book about childhood and family.Favorite Passages:I’ll bet that boy’s father wishes he had a little girl who finger-painted and wiped her hands on the cat when she was little and who once cut her own hair so she would be bald like her uncle and who then grew up to be seven years old and crowned herself with burs. Not every father is lucky enough to have a daughter like that.
  • (4/5)
    Ramona Quimby is now in second grade and her father just lost his job. Their family doesn’t have any extra money, so now there is a concern amongst the whole family about financial situations and looking for employment. While Mr. Quimby is collecting unemployment checks and being the caregiver of the family, Mrs. Quimby finds a job as a receptionist at a pediatrician’s office. This has changed the family dynamics and now everyone must adjust to Mrs. Quimby’s working and Mr. Quimby’s staying at home. Ramona, who has a full imagination and is free-spirited child, now has to worry about things such as money, her father’s smoking, keeping peace in the family, competing with an older sister, Beezus, adjusting to a mother who works, and dealing with an stressed family who tries to make the best of everything, despite their current economic situation. Ramona soon realizes that her family loves her, especially her father, and that, though at times the family may have challenges, as all families do, her family is a loving family who truly care about each other. At the end of the book, her father gets a job as a grocery store cashier. This book would make a great mentor text because it focuses on everyday issues that many families face-job loss, sibling conflicts, childhood fears, and roles of responsibilities. Students can connect with Ramona and her family as they struggle during this hardship. Also, this book takes place in Portland, Oregon and is written by a writer from Oregon. Students could research information on the author, which they might find interesting. There is a section where Ramona and her dad draw the state of Oregon as a mural. This is a great social studies activity that students could do in class that connects the literature to the assignment.
  • (5/5)
    Once again the magic of author Beverly Cleary comes alive in "Ramona and Her Father". While I love all the Ramona books, this one was especially good. I don't know how Mrs. Cleary remembers so well what children think, but it comes through loud and clear in her words. Ramona comes home from school to find the doors locked and her unemployed father missing..."Ramona was frightened. Tears filled her eyes as she sat down on the cold concrete steps to think. Where could her father be? She thought of her friends at school, Davy and Sharon, who did not have fathers. Where had their fathers gone? Everybody had a father sometime. Where could they go? Ramona's insides tightened with fear. Maybe her father was angry with her. Maybe he had gone away because she had tried to make him stop smoking. She thought she was saving his life, but maybe she was being mean to him. Her mother said she must not annoy her father, because he was worried about being out of work. Maybe she had made him so angry he did not love her anymore. Maybe he had gone away because he did not love her. She thought of all the scary things she had seen on television-houses that had fallen down in earthquakes, people shooting people, big hairy men on motorcycles-and knew she needed her father to keep her safe..."Another wonderful trip back to childhood, to being seven, thank you Beverly Cleary!
  • (4/5)
    5Q 4PAfter Ramona's father loses his job things begin to change within the Quimby family inciting Ramona to find funny, silly ways to make things better. Ramona's efforts are often comical but her intentions reveal her empathetic spirit. An especially emotional and complex Ramona book in the series that grapples with a lot of difficult themes that many children encounter.
  • (4/5)
    An entry in the series about Ramona Quimby that tackles more serious subject matter than some of its predecessors. When Mr. Quimby loses his job, the strain begins to wear on the whole family. Ramona, now seven years old, just wants everything to go back to normal: her dad to quit smoking, her mom to be happy again, her sister to stop being cross, and her family to go to Whopper Burger for a family night out. Unfortunately, everything she devises to try and help her family ends in comical disaster. Despite all setbacks, Ramona learns that her family is stronger than disaster, and their love better than any amount of money. Cleary uses her comic touch to deal with the more serious turns in the Quimby household, and offers a story that recognizes big problems in life while still letting us laugh at all those hidden moments of relief that come along, even amidst a crisis. The story's touching moments are all the more poignant because of the humor. The relationship between Ramona and her father is sweet and realistic, and I love Ramona's young and baffled response to what is happening. She may not understand all the ramifications of what is going on, but her heart is clear and true when it comes to her family. I was moved by this story of one family's struggle, and the deep love that sees them through.
  • (5/5)
    "To start off I need to just say, I'm a huge fan of Beverly Cleary. Her book, Socks was the book that started my reading journey when I was very little. Somehow Cleary manages to capture the heart and mind of whomever she is speaking for in her characters. It's truly astounding! This, I feel, is exactly why in her years of writing she has accumulated numerous awards (Newbery, Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Award in '84, and many more) and a devoted following of all ages. Cleary also participates in National Drop Everything And Read Day on April 12th, which also happens to be her birthday. She encourages reading every day, but this event is focused on getting individuals and families to take time and sit down to read together. An amazing author with wonderful books and an ability to reach readers of all ages!"Now, on to Ramona and Her Father...It was awarded the Newbery Honor in 1978, which also happens to be the year I was born, but I guess that's besides the point. Even with the book being originally printed in 1978 I found it highly relevant for today's audience, especially considering our current economic climate. In the very beginning of the book Ramona's father loses his job, unfortunately something many families are dealing with now. The story consists of Ramona's reaction to all that occurs because of this dramatic event in her families life. Ramona goes from trying to make a million dollars, to just trying to make everyone in her family happy, to trying to help her father quit smoking, and eventually just trying to keep a positive attitude herself."What I most loved about the story was how well it was told from the perspective of an eight year old. As a parent sometimes it can be difficult to step outside of yourself and actually truly see how your child might feel about something. Cleary understands how the impact of the main 'bread-winner' losing their job could affect even the youngest member of a family. It opened my eyes to all sorts of situations and points of view. Ramona was kind and concerned for everyone in the family, but obviously still had very 'typical' child-like moments. A very well written and playful story told from the viewpoint of an eight year old. A must read, especially in these difficult times."
  • (4/5)
    This book is a nice easy reader that younger elementary school children might like. It deals with parent unemployment, smoking, mild poverty, and appreciation for the things one possesses, all from a child's point of view.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a girl named Ramona. The story tells about her father losing his job, so the family falls on hard times. Ramona's father goes into a state of depression, and he smokes all the time. Ramona and Beezus try to get their father to quit smoking and to help him earn money. She spends her days reciting various TV commercials, in the hopes of being noticed by a talent scout, when she decides to crown herself with burrs, ending less than successfully. Very good to read to children!
  • (4/5)
    Mr. Quimby works for a small company that has just been purchased by a larger one; subsequently, is out of a job and must find a new one. Mrs. Quimby gets a full-time job at a Dr. Office, so Ramona and her Father are spending a lot of time together. Financial strain pulls at the heart-strings of the families fun, but through picky-picky’s cranky response to the cheap cat food he is served, to Mr. Quimby’s smoking that sets Beezus and particularly Ramona on the path to save his life, the family learns that through all types of adjustments, no one is perfect, and they are truly a happy family; funny, sweet, hopeful. Makes one proud to be a former Oregonian! If You Liked This, Try: Ramona and Her Mother by Beverly Cleary, Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary, Ramona the Brave by Beverly Cleary, Ramona Forever by Beverly Cleary, Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary. Awards: Newbery Honor
  • (5/5)
    Beverly Cleary's story about a child's struggle with adult issues is remarkably well done. The child's voice is very honest and believable. Ramona is honestly concerned about her parents, but she is also naturally self-centered, which makes it difficult for her to accept that her mother has not sewn a good sheep costume for her, despite knowing that her mother has to work late every night and her family doesn't have extra money to spend on material. Still, she struggles against her selfishness and honestly tries to help her family. The final scene at the Christmas pageant is very moving, as Ramona learns to be happy and content in spite of herself.
  • (4/5)
    Not one of my favorite Ramonas. It centers around Mr. Quimby losing his job and finding another one. I did love Ramona and Beezus's quest to get their father to stop smoking
  • (5/5)
    Seven short stories about Ramona Quimby, part of Beverly Cleary's classic series that begins with Beezus and Ramona, and Ramona the Pest. This one is a Newbery Honor book. Ramona is now in Grade Two, and her father has lost his job, which makes him not much fun at home. Ramona tries to make everyone happy, but as usual her plans get a little mixed up. Her misadventures bring unexpected smiles to her family, and to readers everywhere. 187 pages, recommended for grades 1 to 3.