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Girl Parts

Girl Parts

Написано John M. Cusick

Озвучено Chris Patton


Girl Parts

Написано John M. Cusick

Озвучено Chris Patton

оценки:
3.5/5 (14 оценки)
Длина:
5 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
Aug 10, 2010
ISBN:
9781441858429
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

David and Charlie are opposites. David has a million friends, online and off. Charlie is a soulful outsider, off the grid completely. But neither feels close to anybody. When David's parents present him with a hot Companion bot designed to encourage healthy bonds and treat "dissociative disorder," he can't get enough of luscious, redheaded Rose-and he can't get it soon enough. Companions come with strict intimacy protocols, and whenever he tries anything, David gets an electric shock. Severed from the boy she was built to love, Rose turns to Charlie, who finds he can open up to her, knowing that she isn't real. With Charlie's help, the ideal "companion" is about to become her own best friend.

In a stunning and hilarious debut, John M. Cusick takes rollicking aim at Internet culture and our craving for meaningful connection in an uber-connected world.

Издатель:
Издано:
Aug 10, 2010
ISBN:
9781441858429
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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3.5
14 оценки / 14 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (2/5)
    I'm presuming this is the start of a series as the cliffhanger ending was pretty unsatisfying. But even if it is, I won't be picking up the rest. I just found the book too derivative of superior stories - Tanith Lee's 'The Silver Metal Lover', for one, and the manga 'Chobits' by Clamp and 'Absolute Boyfriend' by Yuu Watase, which are all more interesting and moving.
  • (4/5)
    I was kind of turned off by the cover of this book, but the concept was interesting enough that I wanted to read it. First off, this book was definitely, definitely written by a man. There's no two ways about it -- usually it's harder to tell, but it actually worked here (mostly). David is the rich, snobbish boy and Charlie is the bookish nerd, you relate easily to Charlie and you're supposed to. But Cusick does, by the end of the novel, get you to care about David. The main character of the book is Rose, the girl who isn't a girl (but becomes one, sort of). She's a companion bot for David, but becomes much, much more. This book is really about compassion and about growing up, but also about how hard it is to be a teen. It's not without flaws (and there are so many), but it's a good, quick read and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    GIRL PARTS, by John Cusick, centers around two contrasting high school boys dealing with the same "dissociative disorder" that they are diagnosed with. Companions are given to teens who are having face-to-face connection issues to learn boundaries of communication in "real life". In his debut novel, Cusick humorously explores the fate of those who are disconnected from society through technology.This book was a pleasant unexpected surprise. Cusick molded a story around two totally different teens (popular troublemaker versus unpopular nerd) and their link through one not so human Companion, Rose. Both these characters had me laughing out loud during awkward date moments and general male-hormone-driven thoughts.I liked the concept of the Companions. Through Rose's point of view we are able to see how technologically advanced the Sakora Solutions company really is (it's a bit scary too if you ask me!). Rose started off as pretty stiff in her movements and speech but through her "learning" she eventually looked and acted like any other female. She definitely won my heart with her innocence and downright sweetness.Overall, this book was definitely different and I think girls and guys alike will enjoy it. It was hilarious, romantic, and definitely bittersweet. I look forward to reading future releases from this talented author.
  • (3/5)
    Fun, probably more enjoyable to young adults than more experienced readers. The metaphors were blatantly obvious, but I think that as a teen I was always thrilled to be able to pick out a metaphor, so that's okay.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved this book. I thought the cover looked very interesting, so I started reading reviews online and decided to pick it up. And, I'm very glad that I did. I do recommend this book to older teens because there are some heavier topics that are touched upon, but they are done in a very "classy" way. Nothing raunchy, in my opinion. I can't really say much else that other reviewers haven't already said regarding the plot. But, I can add that you really get a feel for Rose and her transformation and the dilemmas/issues she faces. It was such an interesting premise and a well-crafted story. I'm definitely recommending it to everyone.
  • (3/5)
    Final Grade: 80/C240 pagesYA Science FictionAvailable August 10, 2010Review copy won (thanks, WORD for Teens!)Recommend to students: Yes, with reservations (Content: sex, language)REVIEW: "Stunning", "hilarious" and "compulsively readable" all in in the same blurb? *headdesk* A tad much--there is such a thing as over-hyping a book. Usually, this turns me off (or, at least makes me second guess buying/reading it) but the premise was intriguing: boys disassociated from reality, unable to form solid connections with real human beings, given girl robots to teach them how to connect. While I wouldn't say this book was stunning or hilarious or compulsively readable, it was a decent story, and I can see my male students liking it, especially the hot bot Rose.David is a completely unlikable character, even though he's one of the main characters. He's rude and abrasive, a cliche rich kid who has it all and knows he has the "power" over his friends and his parents (especially his mom). After he watches a girl commit suicide live on her blog and does nothing about it, a school psychiatrist recommends a Companion--a robot girlfriend--to teach him how to connect with human beings. After realizing she's not just a sex toy for him (she zaps him with a big shock if he does things he's not supposed to), he actually spends time with her, teaching her things, and taking her to do things he likes to do (like go drinking in the woods with his flunkies and driving fast in his fancy car). But then he finds out something about her (nope, I won't tell--that's a spoiler!), he flips out and she runs away.Charlie is pretty much the opposite of David: little money, lives off the grid, doesn't have any friends/flunkies, and is smart. Plus, he was a character I could get behind, though I would have liked to see him stand up for himself a bit more. He's not good with girls but when he saves Rose, he takes her in and becomes her friend. Rose is an interesting character, being a robot. She comes out of her "egg" with one mission: to connect with David. At first, she mirrors his likes and dislikes but soon learns to think for herself. I liked reading about her development from that of a blank slate to a "real" girl.The beginning of the book was pretty stilted. It didn't really flow and took me quite a while to get into. Once Rose came into the picture, things picked up a bit. And, after Rose ran away, there were the guys from the Companion development company who were looking for her, adding an element of adventure. Not a bad story but not one of my top picks.
  • (3/5)
    Check out my other listens at Eargasms Audiobook Reviews

    This was a really interesting read but not really what the blurb leads you to believe. I did not find it to be stunning or hilarious. There are a a few funny moments but mostly it is angsty and though provoking.

    The key element of the kids dis-associative disorder is very relevant to today's teens. The start of the book is really jarring with the teen suicide. It would have been nice to get more of the background situation of that event.

    The narrative alternates between three POVs, Charlie the quiet loner, David the rich self absorbed kid and Rose the companion robot. Charlie and Rose both had substance and growth throughout the book. David seemed like he was going to grow but really stayed the same jerk from beginning to end. It makes you feel bad for Rose, she is programmed to love him no matter what, that might even be a commentary on teenage romances in general.

    The end is rather vague for Rose, you are never really sure what becomes of her. Charlie has a clearer ending and it is well deserved. David is kind of in the same place he was at the start of the book.

    I listened to the audiobook narrated by Chris Patton, he did a great job of getting me into the story. Each character has a distinct voice, it was really easy to tell who was speaking. His reading speed helps to make the book move along at a steady pace. He did a great job with the ladies voices as well.

    I liked the book but it was not a love connection. There seemed to be so much potential for the characters, sadly the ball was dropped. In the end it was entertaining and thought provoking but never really became deep. It was more of a snack than a full meal, definitely leaves you wanting more.
  • (3/5)
    Narrated by Chris Patton. At their private boys' school, David is popular and wealthy; Charlie is a reclusive nerd on scholarship who gets around by bicycle. They both end up being connected by Rose, one of a line of robot girls designed to help disassociated teens make emotional connections to others. I wasn't really sure where this strange story was leading or what it all meant (we all need human connections?), but Rose does change David and Charlie in a positive way. Narrator Patton gives youthful voice to the various teen types and emotions of the story.
  • (4/5)
    The second half of the book is MUCH better than the first, because Cusik finally starts to deal with the ethical implications of Rose's existence. That's also the part where she begins to be a true adolescent character. My only real complaint is that I wish the book had maybe started there and gone forward. Competently written, with some inspired moments in the prose.
  • (3/5)
    This was an interesting read. I liked the characters, but I wasn't super attached to any of them. They all underwent plausible stunting and growth as the story progressed. I'm not sure how I feel about the ending, though. I feel like it might be a little too tactfully full circle.
  • (3/5)
    The disparity between the social positions of David and Charlie allows Cusick to show how similar they really are. Although David is kind of a jerk and Charlie is sweet, they do have a lot in common. It is through their separate experiences with Rose that readers come to see how she basically does the same thing for both of them. The changes that come about are not exactly the same, but it is evident that Rose is the catalyst for those changes.When Rose is separated from David (for reasons I won’t disclose) Charlie gives her a place to stay. Because Rose was literally created to make David happy, the separation is tough for her. However, this gives Charlie a chance to let down his barriers and actually get to know someone, even if it is a bot. Honestly though, I’m still processing how I feel about Rose as a character and her own journey. Charlie finds someone he thinks may be able to help Rose separate herself (emotionally) from David, and although the help wasn’t exactly what Rose wants, a change does come about. While I see how this change was needed for Charlie’s story arc, I’m not sure how this actually helped Rose, which was Charlie’s intention in taking her to the “Chop Shop” in the first place. There are a lot of things I enjoyed about this book: the role of technology, Charlie’s awkwardness with people, the changes that come about in both David and Charlie as a result of meeting Rose. But there were aspects of the story that left me unsettled in a way I can’t quite define.
  • (4/5)
    Girl Parts is an interesting look at how children of a certain age are disassociating themselves as a result of the growing use of technology. The primary focus is on two boys, David and Charlie. As one would imagine each boy leads life differently but both maintain the commonality of being marked by school leaders and parents who are concerned about their increasingly dissociative behavior.David is not lacking in the friend department. He and his compatriots are seemingly popular in a “rule the school” kind of way. There are undertones of bullying and hostility but it’s not until he is found to have observed the online transmission of a tragic event concerning a school mate that his parents take any action. The resolution for what they consider to be this first step towards desensitization and disassociation is bringing Rose to live with them. The thing of it is that Rose isn’t real in the human sense she’s a robot. Built to be a Companion for boys on the brink she’s specifically designed to provide a personal connection, a relationship, for her “boyfriend”.Charlie is a boy who lives with his single father. The father, who treats Charlie more like an adult than a child, continually expresses his concern for his son’s tendency to be isolated. Though what he doesn’t necessarily know is that Charlie isn’t isolated by choice he’s a bit of a nerd (like his father) and that doesn’t draw the popular crowd’s attention. At least not the positive kind anyway. Charlie too is a potential candidate for a Companion bot but convinces those around him that he doesn’t need that type of help.The two boys do end up crossing paths over time. Not only do they live near each other but they go to the same school and eventually come to the realization that they have a common bond. Rose.The most interesting aspect of Girl Parts is the way Cusick has built in so much irony. Parents want their children to have deeper personal relationships yet they don’t use actual people to achieve that goal. These same parents want to distance their children from technology but then use technology as the catalyst for re-association. It’s really quite enjoyable to dig into the motivations of it all.Does it all work out well? Hell to the no!Just like relationships with real girls there are expectations and difficulties. There is conflict and miscommunication galore. What Cusick shows us is that when all is said and done there is more bad to these “faux” relationships than there are with girls made of flesh and blood or even no relationship at all.Speaking of which, over the course of the book we see the different and complex relationships that both boys have with girls human and robotic alike. It’s a veritable schmorgasbord of high school couplings. David is a bit of a ladies man who, after a bad break-up, works his way through all the pretty and popular girls at school. He is all about the superficial and sexual there is not a whole boat load of depth to him. Girl Parts does a good job of exploring the idea of superficiality. David starts out as all raging hormones and need for a connection (ie: sex) with Rose. The speed at which he accepted Rose was too quick and abrupt, there wasn’t much hesitation in his accepting her into his life as a partner. But you could see, over time, that he was genuinely attaching himself (in a more than physical way) to her. Until, ultimately he accepts the reality that she is, in fact, not a human and as a result can’t do all the things humans can. This shifts his journey and growth in relation to the opposite sex yet again.Charlie on the other hand is awkward and socially inept. He makes the attempt to date but is not always successful in his endeavors. It’s not until Rose arrives in his life that steps outside that box and starts making some long-lasting changes. He evolves to a place where he feels more comfortable with himself and with the girls he wants to get closer to. For Charlie it is less about the superficial and more about depth of character.At the center of all this progression is Rose. Cusick has created both she and the situation that surrounds her as a very dynamic plot. Her humanization is the thread that weaves the three of them together and ultimately provides the boys the stepping stones on which they alter their lives and how they approach relationships.Cusick is an excellent writer who’s set the scene appropriately for the story, with general focus and not much depth. It has the futuristic twist of the Companion bots but does not take the reader completely out of time and place. I felt completely oriented and was able to focus more on the characters and plot instead of the world surrounding them. He excels at character development — he’s created a fun, interesting and insightful journey that has the potential to resonate with any number of teen and adult readers.
  • (4/5)
    Girl Parts opens with a girl named Nora committing suicide to a live internet audience. David inadvertently witnesses the streaming video, and his parents become concerned. After a meeting with his guidance counselor they decide a robotic “companion” might be just what he needs. Companion Rose arrives in a box and David is immediately smitten by how lifelike (and hot) she is. Elsewhere is loner Charlie. He isn’t one of the cool kids. He’d prefer to spend his time studying plant life as opposed to partying with the popular crowd. When David breaks Rose’s heart, Charlie must help pick up the pieces. The entire premise of this book was seriously clever. Dark at moments, yet able to make you laugh during others. This is really something special. It has the necessities to appeal to both male and female readers. Two interesting male protags, and a little bit of mushy romance for readers that dig that sort of thing. I was under the impression this would be a quick, light read based on cover alone. While it was fun, and I read it in just a few hours it packs a punch and makes you think.
  • (4/5)
    Girl Parts was definitely a book that I had to take a step back from in order to form a fair opinion of it. Truly, it isn’t like anything else that I’ve read lately! That of course if a good thing in some respects, unfortunately it also doesn’t give you anything to compare it to. So, after finishing I took a few days to step back and think about my initial reaction after finishing.Let me say this first. The synopsis to this book cleverly leaves out a lot of what the reader will actually find in the book. When I read “…a stunning and hilarious debut…” I really expected something that would have me laughing out loud! I cracked open the book, dove in, and, well I was a little confused to say the least. Girl Parts was definitely nothing like I expected it to be.Now that I’ve explained my initial reaction, let me say that honestly I really did enjoy this book. David and Charlie are wonderful characters, each completely different and yet linked by their “dissociative disorder”. I really enjoyed reading about each boy, and finding out what their motives were for being with Rose. As for Rose herself, she was fascinating. There is no other word to describe her! Rose makes the book what it is, and I was enamored with her the entire time I was reading.There really isn’t much more that I can say without ruining the story line. John Cusick crafts a solid book, and I was happy with it. As I said there is a lot that you will find in the book that isn't present in the synopsis. Just know this, if you are going into this book expecting a laugh, you may or may not find it there. I suppose it all depends on your sense of humor. I’m left feeling a little wanting, but hoping that the next book (yes there is a rumor for a second book) will answer all the of questions I have buzzing in my brain.