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New Spring: The Novel

New Spring: The Novel

Написано Robert Jordan

Озвучено Kate Reading и Michael Kramer


New Spring: The Novel

Написано Robert Jordan

Озвучено Kate Reading и Michael Kramer

оценки:
3/5 (1 244 оценки)
Длина:
12 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
6 янв. 2004 г.
ISBN:
9781593973780
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

From America's premier fantasy writer---#1 New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of Crossroads of Twilight---comes an expanded version of his novella "New Spring," first published in the Legends collection.

For three days battle has raged in the snow around the great city of Tar Valon. In the city, a Foretelling of the future is uttered. On the slopes of Dragonmount, the immense mountain that looms over the city, is born an infant prophesied to change the world. That child must be found before the forces of the Shadow have an opportunity to kill him. Moiraine Damodred, a young Accepted soon to be raised to Aes Sedai, and Lan Mandragoran, a soldier fighting in the battle, are set on paths that will bind their lives together. But those paths are filled with complications and dangers, for Moiraine, of the Royal House of Cairhien, whose king has just died, and Lan, considered the uncrowned king of a nation long dead, find their lives threatened by the plots of those seeking power. "New Spring" related some of these events, in compressed form; New Spring: The Novel tells the whole story.

Издатель:
Издано:
6 янв. 2004 г.
ISBN:
9781593973780
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

ROBERT JORDAN (1948-2007) is best known for his internationally bestselling epic fantasy series The Wheel of Time®, which has sold over 40 million copies in North America and is currently being adapted for the screen. A native of Charleston, Jordan graduated from The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, with a degree in physics. He served two tours in Vietnam with the U.S. Army and received multiple decorations for his service.


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  • (4/5)
    My brother has been after me to read this series for a while now. So I finally decided to start. I really enjoyed getting to know this story!
  • (4/5)
    Lovely short story by Robert Jordan. Ba dum tsss
  • (4/5)
    Although written after the tenth book in the series, this is a prequal, detailing the beginning of the search for the Dragon Reborn. It is written with the same florid language and complex world as the series. If you've read the series, you'll want to read this. Some advised me to not read this before I read the tenth book, as it would spoil the story. However, I actually thought it helped and gave the character of Moiraine depth that increased my enjoyment of the series. If you are a fan of the series, read this. If you are just starting, you could read this first or after the tenth, depending on your beginning knowledge of the story.
  • (4/5)
    There is a lot of information stored in just one small book. New Spring: The Novel is a prequel that takes you through the beginning of the entire series of The Wheel of Time. Written by Robert Jordan, it explains what the mysterious Aes Sedai are and some of the mysteries that are found inside the White Tower. The book also explains some of the myths and legends found throughout the entire book and the future storyline.I started the entire series with this book. I came into it with no prior knowledge of the universe it is set in and didn't know the style it was written in. Upon reading the first couple pages, I knew that it will be quite a good book and that I will most definitely have to buy the rest.The book is filled with witty banter and funny scenes that will connect with everyone's childish side. Also, it really makes you remember times when you where in school and your teachers would be quite strict with you, no matter what you ended up doing. Jordan really transports you to the world of the book with his captivating descriptions and wonderful dialogue. Throughout the story, he introduces new characters with a personality of their own, and makes you love and hate them at the same time.However, I did find myself lost in all the new information some of the times. A lot of things going by very quickly in the book and you my find yourself not knowing what the characters are talking about when the reference a myth or an item here that is very briefly mentioned at early stages of the book. Some of the things aren't very clearly explained though they are clearly important part of the entire book. It seems that he had wrote it where by reading through some of the main books of the series, you would already know some of the things mentioned in the prequel.Overall, the book is a good way to enter yourself into the world that Jordan has woven in the other books he has written. It provides you with some insight into some of the more mysterious and less talked about parts of the entire series. However, there are some things that aren't explained completely clearly in the book, and you may have to read it over again once. New Spring: The Novel caught my attention at a local bookstore and it hooked me onto the entire series. Most likely, it will hook you on as well.
  • (4/5)
    I listened to the audio recording of this, and the readers were again superb. I don't know how well this book would be as a stand alone - I received a lot of value from filling in details of characters and events in the main Wheel of Time story-line.

    The direction of the book feels a bit unwieldy, which is why I suggest it wouldn't do well as a stand-alone, or even as the beginning book to read of the series - I think it fit well to read it after book two (The Great Hunt).

  • (4/5)
    I remember reading this a long time ago. In this story we learn about Moiraine and Siuan and how they got started in searching for the Dragon Reborn. We also get the backstory of how Moiraine met Lan. Overall it's a great short story and gives some more detail into the Wheel of Time series.
  • (3/5)
    After reading the 14 books of the Wheel of Time series, you'd think I wouldn't be interested in reading a prequel to the series. And I wasn't. But I saw it as an audio book and decided to give it a try. It was written in 2004, when Jordan was having real problems moving the Wheel of Time series forward. It's not his best work, but if you've read the rest, you might as well read this. The end suggests to me that Jordan planned to write a sequel to it.
  • (4/5)
    I wavered between 3.5 and 4 stars but in the end, it deserves the higher rating. I started this audiobook yesterday; after a few hours of listening, I planned on doing some other stuff but each time the sleep timer turned the book off, I would want to find out what was going to happen next and turn it back on again. The fact that Jordan's books do that to me tells me that, despite all the things that irritate me, they are indeed better than just good. I found that young Moiraine reminded me a lot of Nynaeve without the braid pulling. My annoyance didn't really start until Moiraine meets Lan - as had happened many times in the series with Rand, the way people are oblivious to the circumstances surrounding other people and their assumptions that they read both the person and events correctly irritate me. However, that irritation is more a reflection on me than Jordan as this facet of human nature is undoubtedly one that exists (particularly in adolescents and young adults!).
  • (5/5)
    Excellent! I recommend it after the first 3 volumes of the Wheel of Time. Easier to understand the characters in this one and it makes it easier to understand how things came into motion and what drives the characters in Wheel of Time.
  • (4/5)
    The Wheel of Time is a series that I really love, so I knew I would love New Spring even before I started it. New Spring is a prequel to the main Wheel of Time series, featuring the Aes Sedai Moiraine Damodred and Siuan Sanche as young women who have not yet been raised to the rank of full Aes Sedai. It also follows the story of al’Lan Mandragoran, the last King of Malkier, who we know in The Wheel of Time as Moiraine’s Warder, and how he ended up bonded to Moiraine.The book assumes that you’re familiar with The Wheel of Time, the various organisations, countries, etc. aren’t really given that much of an explanation.We meet some familiar faces, primarily in the Aes Sedai – Verin, Elaida, Cadsuane, Sheriam and Leane, among others. It’s kind of hard for me to figure out what information was new to us in the book because I read the Wheel of Time wiki so much.It’s definitely interesting to see Moiraine and Siuan, both so inscrutable and awe-inspiring in the main series, as young and immature women still finding their way in the world. Their friendship is really affectionate and well-portrayed. Lan is pretty much unchanged, he’s still honourable, sensible, dutiful and proud. We get to find out a lot of backstory, for instance why Moiraine was searching for the Dragon Reborn, how Lan and Moiraine ended up trusting each other so much, what the Black Ajah had been up to, the decline of the White Tower starting to show.Basically, read it if you love The Wheel of Time. If you haven’t read The Wheel of Time, read at least the first few books in the series before reading this. Skip it if you don’t love The Wheel of Time.Originally posted on my blog.
  • (4/5)
    A great prequel to the Wheel Of Time series. I wish that Brandon Sanderson could write more of these now that Robert Jordan is gone. There are so many characters that deserve their own back story novel.
  • (5/5)
    The prequeal to the series and in my view the most interesting story and introduction to many of the main characters.
  • (5/5)
    Great book. Great narration. I enjoyed it. I would recommend it.
  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I read this book 2nd after a friend had loaned me the first book of the series. Since it took me a bit to collect the entire series... I read this then reread the first. I really liked this book since it helped to set up some the characters as well as prepare you for the entire story. I felt that it gave me a more vested interest in the story as a whole.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This book is quite interesting, but I think that the storyline of the whole series works best if you read the book after book two or three, at the earliest. Otherwise, some perfectly good mysteries are revealed before their time, IMO.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    In the prequel to Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series, with battles erupting near Tar Valon, the Amyrlin Seat calls Moraine and Siuan Sanche, who at the time were recently made Accepted Aes Sedai, and the Keeper foretells of the Dragon Reborn. Moraine and Siuan are tasked to go to Emond’s Field to find out about the Dragon Reborn. Moraine and Siuan are portrayed much differently in this prequel than they are later in the series when they are older. This gives them a little more humanity than how they are later depicted.Reading this novel reminds me of why I started reading this series to begin with. It was fast-paced, intriguing, and fun, not the horribly ponderous, difficult to read, snooze fests that the novels later become (currently I’m on the ninth in the series and wondering if I should continue). I enjoyed the revealing of the background of things that aren’t well explained in the series. There is good action, characterization, and a sound plot. Somewhere along the way, Robert Jordan lost his way, but this prequel is a must read, especially if you have read any other novels in the series.Carl Alves – author of Two For Eternity
  • (4/5)
    My one note on Goodreads on this book was "Not nearly as much spanking in this as in the main series" - and that's a bit sad, considering there was still more spanking than I would consider normal in a non-erotic-type novel. (That's one thing I'll say for Jordan, is the spanking is never erotic. I think that's a plus. I think.)

    This is a prequel to the WoT series, expanded from a short story or novella telling how Lan Mandragoran and Moiraine Demandred met and wound up bonded as Aes Sedai and Warder. I think I raised a scornful eyebrow when I first heard of it, simply because of the extended wait time between books - really, sir, what are you doing exploring the past when the present and immediate future of your world desperately need to be dealt with? But it is a good story. I don't believe I ever read the novella (short story?) but in the novel the tale of How Lan Was Bonded is tied up with the birth of the Dragon Reborn, and the youth of Moiraine and Siuan Sanche, and also with White Tower politics, and - most fun for me, I think, and smartest, what exactly brought Moiraine and Lan into the Two Rivers that day.

    The depiction of the White Tower from the inside, from the points of view of two very different young women living and learning there, was wonderful. There was a lot of good stuff in here. I hadn't ever realized how short-changed we as readers were by the fact that Our Heroines never spent that much time in the Tower; it was startling to learn just how uninformed I was about the step between Accepted and Aes Sedai. We were never shown much of the training, and never anything at all about the later phases.

    I always liked Moiraine, and it was good to see some of the formation of the personality I met in WoT. And to find out just how she dodged the bullet that was the crown of crown of Cairhien – I had wondered. As for Siuan Sanche … I never liked her all that much (early on, little more than "hard as nails" and outbursts about fish guts, later on nearly as angry all the time as Nynaeve and still more fish guts), but this was enlightening. I'm not sure how I feel about her and Moiraine being "pillow friends", or not; this is the one time I wish Jordan was less Victorian about sex in his books and would just say one way or another what the nature of their friendship was. Coyness does not become a grown man – what it does become is irritating. (Not, mind, that I have any – ANY – interest in the boys' sex lives in WoT (A-N-Y), but for Pete's sake just come right out and say it instead of putting on a fan dance.)

    The story took a couple of unexpected turns, and ended up being something quite different from what I did expect. I approve – and I appreciate the story. And, sadly, it makes me wish Jordan had had the chance to explore a few other areas of the canon which might have tantalizingly received little or no attention. I'd love more set before the Breaking. Who knows? Maybe there's stuff still to be released in his papers…
  • (3/5)
    A bit too wierd towards the end
  • (3/5)
    An interesting book. I started The Wheel of Time series mostly out of curiosity. I've heard so many polarized reviews from friends and online, I had to come to a conclusion myself. So, I started at the chronological beginning with New Spring.

    Moiraine and Siuan play an interesting pair. Where Siuan is clever, Moiraine is decisive. Where Moiraine is playful, Siuan is serious. You read of their friendship as Accepted, and testing for Aes Sedai. You learn of Lan, and his meeting with Moiraine.

    But more importantly, the plot rests around the Dragon Reborn, a male born into the world to fight the Dark One. The Aes Sedai focus on finding this child, so it can be properly trained in the White Tower. So goes the story of Moiraine, Siuan, and Lan.

    Then, about 3/4 of the way through the book, the mention of the Dark Ajah emerges, and their plot to kill anyone standing in their way in finding the Dragon Reborn. While the Dark Ajah are interesting, I felt it was too little, too late.

    The world building was good, and character development was solid, but the plot seemed anticlimatic. I would have liked to see more Dark Ajah earlier in the story, and I would have liked to see more conflict between the Dark Ajah and the other characters. But, I guess they'll be discussed more frequently as the series moves on.
  • (4/5)
    Though this book has been out a while, I'd not read it. At first, it was because I'd put the series aside for a while. When I started up again, Robert Jordan had died, and the series was being finished by another author, with the able help of Team Jordan. I decided to save New Spring to read until I'd completed the final book, so that I could end my Wheel of Time with Robert Jordan's actual writing. I did love the filling in of details to the beginning of the Wheel of Time story, especially since it involved some of my favorite characters. (Note: the first time I put the series aside, it was when Moiraine disappeared and Lan went off.)And I loved stumbling into some of RJ's catch phrases. So much fun, especially since I know the end of the story and who really is Black Ajah/darkfriends. :)Ah, Jim, I miss you. As a friend, as an author, as the creator of a world that has brought so many people into my life through love of your writing. You are loved and missed.
  • (4/5)
    This prequel to Wheel of Time only reminded me why I liked this series and persuaded me not only to continue reading it but to also re-read the parts I already read. I stooped reading after book 6 when Robert Jordan died, but now when I know that Brandon Sanderson (my favorite writer) is working hard on finishing it, I know that all hope is not lost. :)

    When should you read this book? Although it is labeled as a prequel, I am not sure it is smart reading it before other books, because then some things that Jordan carefully and gradually explains through multiple parts/books will not be surprise to us. So I would recommend reading it later, but it is your choice.

    What is this book about? Simply explained, about Moiraine and Lan. How they met and how he became her warder.
  • (4/5)
    Overall, the story flowed along nicely. It was almost like I had just discovered Jordan's work again. I actually stayed up late and kept reading until I was done; something I haven't done since book 3 or 4. The next chapter, Knife of Dreams (Wheel of Time, Book 11), had the same effect on me. If you haven't read any of the Jordan series before I suggest you be careful before you do. Obviously (since we are waiting on book 12, not counting New Spring), the series is LONG. Not only that but each book is LONG. So reading the series is a commitment. Personally, I think it is a worthwhile commitment - but it is a commitment nonetheless.
  • (3/5)
    If I remember correctly I wasn't particularly fond of Moraine in the first two books of the Wheel of Time series, but she eventually grew on me. However this book brought me right back to the not liking part. She's very arrogant and down-right mean sometimes in this book. I don't know why Lan agrees to be her Warder in the end. I didn't like her at all. The plot was relevant to the series but this piece of time before the series’ events didn't hold my attention as much as I'd hoped it would. Not enough plot and too much detail. I like detail but I liked it balanced with a really good plot. It's better than some of the later books in the series but I really had a hard time finishing it, and mainly because of Moraine. If I had liked her more, it could have been smoother. But I didn't like her. Recommended for hard core fans of the WoT series, but if not, go ahead and move right along. :)
  • (4/5)
    The Wheel of Time prequel, New Spring, is a very good addition to the series written by Robert Jordan. I read New Spring after Booke 5, The Fires of Heaven, based off the recommendation of several WoT fans instead of after Crossroads of Twilight (Book 10) when the prequel was published. Considering that Moiraine and Lan are the main POV characters throught the book and that after the events of The Fires of Heaven, reading the prequel when I did made New Spring both enjoyable and bittersweet.Obviously New Spring helps explain the motivations of both Moiraine and Lan when we first meet them in The Eye of the World, but it also gives us a view of the "normal" workings of Aes Sedai and the White Tower before the unusual happenings already seen in the series. Politics of the world are fully in view with Lan finding himself in the midst of the "biggest" political storm. If I were to find a bad thing about New Spring is that some of the material that Jordan wrote to expand New Spring from a short story to a full novel(la) seems to be just filler making the story bog down a tad.Overall, New Spring is a good quality introduction to some of the "older" characters of the early Wheel of Time books and I fully recommend reading it, especially after Book 5, The Fires of Heaven.
  • (4/5)
    There is a lot of information stored in just one small book. New Spring: The Novel is a prequel that takes you through the beginning of the entire series of The Wheel of Time. Written by Robert Jordan, it explains what the mysterious Aes Sedai are and some of the mysteries that are found inside the White Tower. The book also explains some of the myths and legends found throughout the entire book and the future storyline.I started the entire series with this book. I came into it with no prior knowledge of the universe it is set in and didn't know the style it was written in. Upon reading the first couple pages, I knew that it will be quite a good book and that I will most definitely have to buy the rest.The book is filled with witty banter and funny scenes that will connect with everyone's childish side. Also, it really makes you remember times when you where in school and your teachers would be quite strict with you, no matter what you ended up doing. Jordan really transports you to the world of the book with his captivating descriptions and wonderful dialogue. Throughout the story, he introduces new characters with a personality of their own, and makes you love and hate them at the same time.However, I did find myself lost in all the new information some of the times. A lot of things going by very quickly in the book and you my find yourself not knowing what the characters are talking about when the reference a myth or an item here that is very briefly mentioned at early stages of the book. Some of the things aren't very clearly explained though they are clearly important part of the entire book. It seems that he had wrote it where by reading through some of the main books of the series, you would already know some of the things mentioned in the prequel.Overall, the book is a good way to enter yourself into the world that Jordan has woven in the other books he has written. It provides you with some insight into some of the more mysterious and less talked about parts of the entire series. However, there are some things that aren't explained completely clearly in the book, and you may have to read it over again once. New Spring: The Novel caught my attention at a local bookstore and it hooked me onto the entire series. Most likely, it will hook you on as well.
  • (3/5)
    I do enjoy The Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan. The books are not without their flaws: the characters are somewhat flat, especially the women who all seem bad-tempered, passionate and dangerous. What I find compelling is Jordan’s world building. This is a complex world, with various societies, a long, detailed history and plenty of action from both heroes and villains. And I am fascinated by the continuity of these books: in ten volumes I have not found a single plot conflict, even after re-reading the works.In the latest book, Jordan looks back to the beginning of the Dragon Reborn, following the early years of Moiriane Damodred as she becomes an Aes Sedai, and the path of Lan Mandragoran as he fights the invasion of Aiel. To those who have read any of The Wheel of Time series, these names will be familiar: to those who have not, these are pivotal characters in that series. You need not have read any of the series to understand New Spring: being a prequel, it does not rely on the other works to enjoy this one. Moiriane maybe a noble in the Cairhien court, but this counts for little in the White Tower of the Aes Sedai, where all the Accepted are treated the same regardless of their background. She receives the same training and discipline as her best friend, Siuan, who is a fisherman’s daughter. Both of these women are determined to become full Aes Sedai and much of the book is their struggles to gain that position. The Aes Sedai are women with the One Power, a magical force that gives them huge influence, both politically and socially. This comes with large responsibilities and as Moiriane learns, becoming a sister does not give her complete freedom. Only a few Aes Sedai know of the birth of a baby boy who is prophesied to save the world by breaking it: among these are Moiriane and Siuan, who want to find and protect this child, but must first deal with Tower politics and rivalry. When an evil force appears within the Aes Sedai, they choices become more constrained and urgent.As the same time, we follow Lan, a warrior facing the now retreating hoards of Aiel. As the war winds down, Lan finds he is in the middle of political intrigues, as a former lover has raised the flag of Malkier, a kingdom that was wiped out twenty-five years before, but for which Lan is the last heir. During his travels to prevent this dangerous cause, he meets up with Moiriane and the two begin a intermittent and contrary relationship. Both the soldier and the Aes Sedai need each other to face the dark forces that are threatening them.Because of a long trip, I listened to the audio version of this work. The entire text is under 350 pages, a small work for this series, but the CDs were a total of thirteen hours. While not as fast as reading the book, the audio version was a very pleasant experience, as Audio Renaissance choose the readers carefully and Kate Reading and Michael Kramer did an excellent job. Not only did they have fine speaking voices, but they conveyed the story with the right level of feeling and intrigue. Listening to a book has a different feel than reading it, and while I did not sink into the plot the same way, it was still a good experience AND I now know how to pronounce Tuatha’an. Whether you read or listen to this work, it is a interesting story. Jordan’s characters are still a bit flat, but the further explanation of this world makes it worth the read. As a introduction to The Wheel of Time or as further reading, New Spring is a good book.
  • (5/5)
    You know when a series is so delicious, you never want it to end? This is one of those ... but this one doesn't end! Jordan started his series 20 years ago (Eye of the World was published in 1991), supposedly as a trilogy, but we're still waiting for the last book, which will be number 14. I love the rich detail that he puts into these books, although a lot of readers get impatient with the constant skirt-twitching that all the ladies seem to have to do (especially in the later volumes)! It is understandable, because right at the beginning of the series he told us that he knew exactly what the very last scene of the whole story would be; and, naturally, we want to know, too! Unfortunately, Robert Jordan passed away before writing the last book, which he promised would be a single volume. Before doing so, he passed the torch on to his wife and Brandon Sanderson. However, there was so much information that they decided to publish it in 3 volumes - and so we are still waiting for the end of the series ....This is a prequel to the Wheel of Time series, with events occuring about twenty years before Eye of the World, though it was written more than half-way through, in 2004. This book tells the story of the prophecy made in the White Tower, when Moiraine was not yet an Aes Sedai, that told of the birth of the Dragon Reborn, the only hope of the world; but in saving the world, he will break it. The series itself is about how the prophesied Dragon is found and fulfills his destiny. Having read the first ten or so books in the series, I recognise some of the characters at an earlier point in their careers. This story covers Moiraine (a central character in 'Eye of the World') becoming an Aes Sedai (a woman who can wield sorceress-like powers), the beginning of her search for the Dragon, and how she met and bonded her Warder, Lan. It can be read as a stand-alone book, and is not essential to the series itself; but it does fill in some points of interest, and gives some insights into the workings of the Aes Sedai.I like the way Robert Jordan writes, rich with trivial-seeming details that bring the story to life: wall hangings are "colourful winter tapestries ... bright scenes of spring and garden parks". Because the cast of characters in the series are spread over two continents and several centuries, these little details that characterise each person help keep them in mind the next time we meet them. The atmosphere in this prequel takes me back to the first three books, before the scope of the narrative widened so dramatically.I really enjoyed this book, and reading it makes me want to re-read the whole series (especially now that it seems the end is in sight!).
  • (4/5)
    Yet another great installment in the wonderful Wheel of Time series. I read this right before Towers of Midnight, and I'm glad I did, because TofM referenced this novel! It was very interesting to get Moiraine's backstory, and to find out more about the White Tower and Aes Sedai. I also enjoyed reading this one in particular when I did because it reminded me of Robert Jordan's writing style, and how it differs from Brandon Sanderson's. (I like them both very much.) This novel didn't feel essential to the WoT series, but I still liked it a lot.
  • (4/5)
    With the release of The Gathering Storm announced for November of 2009 it is time once more to read all the preceeding books and reimmerse oneself into the rich and complex world of Robert Jordan. I am older now than when I first began this journey. Middle aged instead of a young adult. I see the world differently and not as recklessly as before.That may have changed my feeling for the writer, who has gone. In the first paragraph, '...fat sickle of the moon hung low, giving barely light...' Right away i am taken out of the story and forced to wonder why the words sounds horrible in my ears. For they do. Here is a writer who at this time has 2 proofreaders to catch this and there are several other blatant mistakes like that throughout.In any event we start with Lan as young man around the time of Rand's birthing. The Aiel War. One chapter later we are in the midst of Tower politics and wondering if any of what we read contradicts what has been written elsewhere. It does seem to do so. We stay with the tower and the beginning of Moiraines quest to find the Dragon. That Moiraine finds the Black Ajah, fine, but that they don't find her, rubbish. They Black have no compunction about killing. Two very strong Accepted don't lean their way. Both attended the Amyrlin who they kill when the critical information came to light. Questioned and killed out of hand. The entire Black Ajah piece, and why the rulers of Kandor are brought into it for no gain for the Black is all rushed and ill thought out. Trying to tie to gether the Legends short story, but in the end fails.Further, writers learn about show, don't tell, but Jordan has used his fame and ability to sell books to a produce this short piece for full price. And to use exposition to the detriment of development.The book would never stand on its own. And only should be kept in your collection to complete the series. If you can get away without having a tactile copy in your hand, then you could save a great deal of space for something better. In all New Spring is a disappointment, and it was a great disservice. The entire last quarter is something that Jordan normally would have spent his time expanding and enriching. In all it seems like an outline he rushed together.
  • (4/5)
    This is a good prequel. It expands on things we knew about Lan and Moiraine, and adds a lot of things we didn't know. It also fills in a lot of detail about the White Tower. If you read the Wheel of Time series, this is a must read. Its also much shorter and more complete than the books in the series.