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Next

Next

Написано Michael Crichton

Озвучено Dylan Baker


Next

Написано Michael Crichton

Озвучено Dylan Baker

оценки:
3.5/5 (113 оценки)
Длина:
13 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Nov 28, 2006
ISBN:
9780061338724
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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Описание

Is a loved one missing some body parts? Are blondes becoming extinct? Is everyone at your dinner table of the same species? Humans and chimpanzees differ in only 400 genes; is that why an adult human being resembles a chimp fetus? And should that worry us? There's a new genetic cure for drug addiction—is it worse than the disease?

We live in a time of momentous scientific leaps; a time when it's possible to sell our eggs and sperm online for thousands of dollars or test our spouses for genetic maladies. We live in a time when one fifth of all our genes are owned by someone else, and an unsuspecting person and his family can be pursued cross-country because they happen to have certain valuable genes within their chromosomes . . .

Devilishly clever, Next blends fact and fiction into a breathless tale of a new world where nothing is what it seems, and a set of new possibilities can open at every turn. Next challenges our sense of reality and notions of morality. Balancing the comic and bizarre with the genuinely frightening and disturbing, Next shatters our assumptions, and reveals shocking new choices where we least expect.

The future is closer than you think. Get used to it.

Performed by Dylan Baker

Издатель:
Издано:
Nov 28, 2006
ISBN:
9780061338724
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге

Об авторе

Michael Crichton (1942-2008) was the author of the bestselling novels The Terminal Man, The Great Train Robbery, Jurassic Park, Sphere, Disclosure, Prey, State of Fear, Next and Dragon Teeth, among many others. His books have sold more than 200 million copies worldwide, have been translated into forty languages, and have provided the basis for fifteen feature films. He wrote and directed Westworld, The Great Train Robbery, Runaway, Looker, Coma and created the hit television series ER. Crichton remains the only writer to have a number one book, movie, and TV show in the same year. Daniel H. Wilson is a Cherokee citizen and author of the New York Times bestselling Robopocalypse and its sequel Robogenesis, as well as ten other books. He recently wrote the Earth 2: Society comic book series for DC Comics. Wilson earned a PhD in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University, as well as master’s degrees in Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. He has published over a dozen scientific papers and holds four patents. Wilson lives in Portland, Oregon.


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Что люди думают о Next

3.4
113 оценки / 98 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (2/5)
    This was only the second of Crichton's book that I did not enjoy as much as the others I've read. It wasn't as much of a page-turner and the ending was disappointing. When reading, it felt like I was not sure where the book was heading, not in the way where it was suspenseful, but in a way where it felt all the different stories and characters were disconnected, although the storyline connected them to the issue of trans-gene therapy.The ending was anticlimactic.However, I still love the "Author's Notes" that Crichten adds to most of his books, discussing the factual issues on which his book is based.
  • (5/5)
    Scary that this is actually the world we live in...
    I'd like scientists 'round the globe to grow a pair and be honest all the time...is it that hard?
  • (1/5)
    I shoulda heeded the cover copy. "As good as anything since Jurassic Park" or something similar.

    True enough. It was a fast read, quite interesting, for sure, but not exciting in the slightest. Buy it used if you have to read it. DEFINITELY don't pay airport book store prices.
  • (4/5)
    Loved the parrot!
  • (4/5)
    In Next Critchton explored a frightening future in which genetic manipulations interweave existing species and create legal chaos. There are currently prohibitions against this kind of genetic engineering, but this novel illustrates why these sanctions are unlikely to remain in place over the long term. There's lots of action and adventure here, as well as humor, making for an entertaining story.
  • (3/5)
    It's incredible!
  • (3/5)
    Decent enough sci-fi tale, involving ape/human hybrids.
  • (1/5)
    I was very disappointed in this book and almost didn't finish it. I was disappointed, because the author Michael Crichton has written some of the best speculative fiction, and I was hoping for something on the order of Jurassic Park or Prey. It was a mess of two incoherent story lines that were based on the ethics of genetic manipulation, but they stretched science and good story telling as to lose credibility.

    If you want to remember Michael Crichton as a good author, don't read this book.
  • (2/5)
    I found this book to be frustratingly fragmented, to the point where it was virtually impossible to keep track of all of the characters and to identify (much less follow) the central flow of the narrative. There really is no clearly defined protagonist or antagonist, and I couldn't find any character for whom I felt sympathy. Crichton's point seems to be that the "wild, wild West" of genetic engineering / biotechnology is pure chaos, a world tied into so many legal and ethical knots that it's impossible to disentangle at this moment in time. Everyone involved in this world seems to be portrayed as selfish, ruthless, and avaricious, completely ignoring the consequences of their self-serving actions.There's certainly compelling science here, and Crichton makes a strong case for why we need to impose some semblance of order and sanity on this emerging area of technology that is fraught with potential dangers for human society. But this felt more like a polemic than a novel.
  • (3/5)
    Great science fiction novel, but also has some bleak undertones. One of the main character's outlook on humanity is pretty gruesome -- believing that humans are nothing but lying, thieving monsters. But, that only the good ones can overcome the fight or flight reactions and be compassionate, and caring. Good book.
  • (4/5)
    In Next, Michael Crichton delivers another fun, intellectually stimulating read as he explores the topic of today's completely unregulated world of genetic science and genetic engineering. The story takes the reader from the wilds of Borneo to the NIH's primate research campus to corporate labs and boardrooms, where careless researchers and financially-driven biotech CEOs play Russian roulette with the human genome and our collective future. Well researched, with a vaguely drawn line between what is and isn't real, Next tantalizes as it terrifies us with the unimaginable consequences that can, and probably do, occur regularly, when reckless hubris, unbridled greed, out-of-step courts, absentee legislators and human frailties collide. The book's depth, however, does not match its breadth. In his effort to keep the pace of the book galloping forward, Chrichton misses an opportunity to create more multidimensional characters and a far richer reader experience. Still, a fascinating and intriguing read.
  • (4/5)
    This book is based around the Genetics Industry and how everyone of the companies is trying to be the first with the miracle cure to the diseases of the world. Unfortunately the reason behind it though for the companies is not the glory of helping mankind but the money they would make on the sales of the products and the pantents.The story is loosely based around the company called BioGen who own the Burnett line. DNA from someone who they cured of cancer and from this used his cells to create the next big selling drug. At the same time as this we follow seperate stories where tests have been carried out on Parrots and Chimps so that they gain the chance to talk and act as normal human beings (the latter in the case of the Chimp. But no one wants to bring this forward as the radical finding it is as it was all done in secrecy and illegally.The strands come together when the Burnett line is destroyed by an investor who thinks that the control is has over the company will be diminished if this new line succeeds as planned. All of which leads to Frakn Burnett going into hiding and the BioGen company sending Bounty Hunters to chase down his daughter and grandson. The reasoning being if they owned his DNA/cells then they also own those of the Daughter and Grandson. And they were going to get them at any cost.A good book and an easy read. And totally believable to be honest. You could see this happening even if the morals behind the companies thinking were dubious. But when money is involved.............
  • (4/5)
    Lots of character in this book, way too many to be able to remember without bashing your head into pieces. However, it's the ideas and whole advent of genetic engineering that earns this book my stars. It cautions that with our current society's addiction with patents and copyright infringements, genetics will be the next huge industry that'll control how society functions. Very scary indeed.
  • (3/5)
    A genetic based thriller about a possible near future where genetic research and treatments become abused by corporations, the court system, and other areas. The story has multiple POVs that deal with different areas of concern with genetics in a health system, financial, and in our culture. While the idea of exploring a science fiction genetic thriller is a great idea, the execution is poor. The main problem is that the POVs jump back and forth very quickly. Some chapters are shorter then 1 page. There was not near enough time to figure out the characters and their story line. The ideas and the implications behind the book are entertaining. If the author would have just focused on one POV for a longer period of time before moving on, it would have been a much better read.
  • (4/5)
    Not the standard Crichton fiction action/adventure but I enjoyed it and feel too many gave it a bum rap. The novel is a loosely-knit collection of possible quandaries / anecdotes that illustrate some real and some possible problems within the big picture of genetic research today. Crichton's NF 'Author's Note' about his research for this novel along with his insights and thoughtful conclusions about gene research, gene patents, gene testing, human tissue ownership, unenforceable research bans, & the Bayh-Dole Act (in light of its unintended consequences) are worth the price of admission alone! I recommend this book both as an fun interesting pop lit read and for Crichton's NF research notes.
  • (4/5)
    Michael Crichton never fails to give you enough information to understand his topic. Unfortunately, it's sometimes overwhelming. The storyline is gripping in its concept - genome manipulating technology is already here and hard to control. That's the thing about Crichton - he can make things real enough to scare the pants off you.
  • (2/5)
    Of all MC's books, this is by far my least favorite. It read like a thick biology textbook. He continued to introduce new characters every other chapter for the entire length of the book, most of whom were somehow connected to other characters. It was impossible to keep them straight, and I read the book much more quickly than I normally would. If I'd read it over the course of two weeks, I'd have been hopelessly lost. Finally, what was probably supposed to be a cautionary tale felt more like an excuse to get up on a soap box and show off how much he knows about genetic research, then to smack us around and tell us how the world was soon to be ruined by it and its political interests. I enjoy his works best when he wraps science in adventure. This was politics wearing a thin, dry coat of science, and I was very disappointed.
  • (4/5)
    A scary (and scattered) smorgasbord of the potential physical, moral and legal horrors in the applications of biogenics, i.e. viruses, DNA, genetics, by scientists, corporations and individuals. Next did make me consider things I hadn't thought of but there was too much going, too overwhelming. I think the novel would have been more effective if it had focussed on just one or two scenarios.
  • (5/5)
    Of course this was terrific although the audio had me puzzled for a good chunk of the first disk because Crichton had to introduce the characters in the different and/or overlapping stories and all the names were a little confusing---I'll admit I started over about three times. The interview with him at the end is a little old but just as the book covers some very current happenings, so do his answers to questions. He knew that the world was catching up too fast to anything he could possibly write---in many ways, very sadly. Dylan Baker made for terrific listening with all the different voices---particularly Dave and Gerard, very special characters in the book.
  • (4/5)
     This book raises a lot of important philosophical questions about the development of other species and our own anthropology.
  • (3/5)
    The crescendo of thrill that usually culminates in a enjoyablke climax is missing in this Crichton book. The story is thought-provoking and well told, but the thrill is limited.
  • (1/5)
    After hearing many wonderful things about the author i was rather disapointed in this novel. I found it rather scattered, Crichton tried to fit to many different stories into one. I feel the novel would of been not only eisier to follow but more enjoyable as a collection of short stories, still an interesting read and very thought proviking if nothing else.
  • (3/5)
    This was not necessarily a bad novel (I still rated it right around average!) but suffice it to say that it is the worst Crichton novel that I have read thus far. I think where Next fails is that Mr. Crichton tried to get too many storylines going in order to have them all running simultaneously in an effort to show a more grand scope to his issues of possible problems with genetic research.The main problem here is that many of the characters became washed out and meaningless. There is just so much going on with so many different characters that I kept having to reset and figure out who was who and exactly what was going on with them. I think that he had the bones here to craft a really good storyline, but would have benefited tremendously from a heavy dose of self-editing and then expanding the tales of those characters that he felt most essential to keep.What came out of this book for me was confusing and subsequently, quite boring. Michael Crichton is one of my favorite authors in contemporary fiction however and I am not discouraged enough by one stinker to stop reading his novels.
  • (2/5)
    Some interesting concepts re morality and science - If this is your bag you might like this book more than I did. I found it disjointed and not really a story - Rather a "description" of a time in the life of some people and animals. No satisfying closure!... Perhaps this was the point. Overall an unsatisfying read.
  • (2/5)
    The subject matter was interesting but, to me it seemed like the way the story told was all over the place. I felt like I was watching what life is like for some one with ADD. Who really puts in 95 chapters in a book anyway?
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this book, all the bio-engineering being such a debatable point in nowadays culture. We follow multiple story of people who's lives are (or about to be) impacted by Bio-Engineering. From a talking African Grey parrot who gets kidnapped, to a family who adopts a half-human, half ape as a son. To Researchers trying to develop a gene that will cure addictions... This book as a lot of characters and needs to be read in a short period of time if one doesn't want to be lost.I always enjoyed the Crichton book. This one didn't disappoint.
  • (2/5)
    In "Next," science fiction author Michael Crichton returns to his most fertile subject matter, genetic engineering. Weaving together several stories involving scientists, corporate executives, tourists, hired thugs, and an artificially created simian, Crichton blends fact, scientific potential, and fantasy into a page-turning narrative.Unfortunately, unlike several previous novels that clung, however breathtakingly, to fantastic plausibility, this novel frequently descends into the absurd and ridiculous. This is enormously disappointing given the quality of many of Crichton's previous novels, especially such classics as "The Andromeda Strain" and "Jurassic Park." While the late authors literary skills are evident, they never coalesce into a pleasing novel here.In part, this is due to Crichton's attempt to offer a complex narrative of multiple overlapping stories that eventually converge, similar to films such as "Crash" and "Babel." Too often, this ambitious approach leads to confusion and disinterest. Those who tend to be critical of Crichton's character development might blame the confusion on that, though it is more likely due to the author's intentional use of multiple narrative voices, including frequent extended quotations of journalistic sources (whether these are actual quotations or fictitious creations attributed to real sources is never clear).Fans of Crichton's previous books are unlikely to appreciate this attempt, while those unfamiliar with his work will likely the unimpressed.
  • (4/5)
    I vaguely remember the fast pace and an excellent character being a chimp (?) speaking in French accent (maybe named Marcel??).
  • (3/5)
    A bit of a let down for me. I have been reading Michael Crichton's books for years and I hope the publisher will soon release some of the stories he was working on prior to his most sad departure. I believe the first novel was "Andromeda Strain" (although I thought the characters in this story needed developed more thoroughly) and of course "Jurassic Park" and then there was "State of Fear" which I enjoyed and a few others. But, I must say that this novel, "Next" had a lot to be desired. I would even go so far as to say it was a bigggg disappointment. Sorry. It wasn't because of the splattering of foul language, which I'm not a big fan of, (I never understood why authors have to fill pages up with profanity.) Many stories will stand on its own without it or toned down to a reasonable level. Just my point of view.I thought that in the novel the plot never really materialized and the characters were never fully developed. I never felt I knew the character, Henry Kendall, the researcher. I would have liked Mr. Crichton to have spent more time to allow the reader know what makes this guy tick. After all, he has mixed the human and chimp DNA to produce a hybrid child. Also, on a side note, I wasn't enthralled with the talking chimp and parrot. If those characters had met a quick end, I would not have been sorry to see them go. On the surface when you read the synopsis one would think that this novel would be a interesting, and a exciting read. However this was no page turner and for me it was a let down.
  • (3/5)
    A good book by Michale Crichton that is about genetic testing, and genetic engineering. This book is focused on researchers looking at the difference between monkeys and humans, and trying to make a hybrid of half monkey, half human.