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Canada

Canada

Написано Richard Ford

Озвучено Holter Graham


Canada

Написано Richard Ford

Озвучено Holter Graham

оценки:
3/5 (709 оценки)
Длина:
13 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
22 мая 2012 г.
ISBN:
9780062189455
Формат:

Описание

First, I'll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then the murders, which happened later.

When 15-year-old Dell Parsons' parents rob a bank, his sense of normal life is forever altered. In an instant, this private cataclysm drives his life into before and after, a threshold that can never be uncrossed.

His parents' arrest and imprisonment mean a threatening and uncertain future for Dell and his twin sister, Berner. Willful and burning with resentment, Berner flees their home in Montana, abandoning her brother and her life. But Dell is not completely alone. A family friend intervenes, spiriting him across the Canadian border, in hopes of delivering him to a better life. There, afloat on the prairie of Saskatchewan, Dell is taken in by Arthur Remlinger, an enigmatic and charismatic American whose cool reserve masks a dark and violent nature.

Undone by the calamity of his parents' robbery and arrest, Dell struggles under the vast prairie sky to remake himself and define the adults he thought he knew. But his search for grace and peace only moves him nearer to a harrowing and murderous collision with Remlinger, an elemental force of darkness.

A true masterwork of haunting and spectacular vision from one of our greatest writers, Canada is a profound novel of boundaries traversed, innocence lost and reconciled, and the mysterious and consoling bonds of family. Told in spare, elegant prose, both resonant and luminous, it is destined to become a classic.

A HarperAudio production.

Издатель:
Издано:
22 мая 2012 г.
ISBN:
9780062189455
Формат:

Об авторе

Richard Ford is the author of The Sportswriter; Independence Day, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award; The Lay of the Land; and the New York Times bestseller Canada. His short story collections include the bestseller Let Me Be Frank With You, Sorry for Your Trouble, Rock Springs and A Multitude of Sins, which contain many widely anthologized stories. He lives in New Orleans with his wife Kristina Ford.


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3.1
709 оценки / 79 Обзоры
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  • (2/5)
    No suspense, minimal action, no plot twists/surprises, endless, repetitive descriptions of the same people/scenery/smells, a dull main character- Dell.....I just kept waiting for something meaningful to happen to reward me for slogging through this long, slow novel. Two stars for masterful descriptions of towns, rooms, and all of those smells, but so little happened - actually things happened but it felt like Dell was sleep- walking through all of it.
  • (2/5)
    I had high hopes for this one, however, it just never delivered.

    We find out in the first couple of paragraphs what happens in the book, but, the anticipation is 'supposed' to come with the telling of the back story. There was no anticipation and the back story is just plain boring.

    If you are looking for something to make you drowsy while suffering from insomnia, this is the book for you.

  • (4/5)
    I am ambivalent about this book. On the one hand I have enjoyed Richard Ford in the past and found the book easy to read. This was a quick read, the story moved a long briskly and the characters were complicated in a good way.The story revolves around a teenaged boy whose parents uncharacteristically decide to rob a bank. Caught, they leave him and his sister with no direction nor guidance. the sister, a more independent soul, runs away while the boy is taken to Canada by his mom's friend to hide out with her brother who, also, has a hidden secret.While engaging, once I finished the book, I was left feeling unsatisfied as if it could have been much better.
  • (4/5)
    I am a big Ford fan, but bucking the critical consensus, I wouldn't put Canada up there with his very best. It's unequivocally a book of two halves, and for me, the first half was a much stronger book than the second. It left me with a feeling of slight flabbiness, and that Ford had a destination in mind, determined to get there at the expense of better construction. Del Parson is the narrator of the novel, an older man now stepping us through the most tumultuous period of his life, when his parents resolved to commit a bank robbery. That decision will shatter Del's young life and change him, and his family, inalterably. The first thing to talk about, when you're talking about Ford's books, is the prose. As always, it is achingly good. His ability to capture the thoughts of a fifteen year old boy, when written from the vantage point of a man in his sixties (both Ford, and the adult Del, looking back), is remarkable. What's even more remarkable is its readability. Ford has never been one for literary pyrotechnics, but the profundity and beauty of his words is easy glide over and miss because it's just so darned easy to digest. The simplicity belies the care and weight Ford invests in his sentences. The way he closes his chapters is just beauitful poetry. There's an equal facility (mostly; we'll get to that), with his characters. Ford isn't interested in cutting anyone's heads open, and laying their thoughts out for the reader to pick through like beachcombers. Instead we get actions, sometimes cryptic; words, often contradictory; and Del's own insightful, but limited observations. It works, very well. Del's portrait of his brittle, strained family and prickly twin sister are so real and undeniably human, I found myself helplessly loving them just as Del does. Ford struggles more in the second half of the book, where Del interacts with a far more eccentric (and I felt less real) cast of characters. Whilst Ford refuses to overwrite, in dealing with characters that are more extreme, it's easier to slip towards cliche or cypher - which disappointed me. I also felt the rushed timeline lent an unreal air to this part of the story. The tension he had built so masterfully in the first half was strangely absent, and the denouement was simply far too speedy. For all that, it is not a bad book; simply a less strong one from Ford. Well worth reading from one of the masters of American literature.
  • (4/5)
    I Really enjoyed this one. I thought the pace was a bit slow in the middle, but perhaps necessary. The chapters were short during the tumultuous early years when his parents become criminals, than longer during his time in the prairies of Canada, when time really slows down for the young protagonist son. Really gave me a sense of time and space. It was my first book by Richard Ford and I am looking forward to another one. Really loved his writing. I so wanted to give this 5 stars, but not this time.
  • (1/5)
    Couldn't finish. Very long winded without a lot of story. Took chapters of talking about a bank robbery that parents would do. I didn't last to the actual robbery.
  • (4/5)
    A very engaging narrative voice kept me interested in a story I wouldn’t have expected to grab me.
  • (3/5)
    Richard Ford has written a book that keeps the reader engaged through strong, terse prose and rich descriptions, but is also quite dull on a whole. The narrator is slightly insipid and the scope of the narrative (he's writing about it fifty years in the future) leaves lots of room for quick glimpses of tension to come and some ruminating on the circumstances the narrator faced when he was fifteen and couldn't comprehend anyway. Canada also has the most boring incest scene I've ever read. I wouldn't recommend it but I did enjoy some of the flourishes apart from the narrow yet quite discursive narrative.
  • (4/5)
    I think a lot of readers might complain that Richard Ford's "Canada" is, well, a lot like a lot of other novels. It's a coming of age tale set in the big, wide-open American West and, later, the location indicated by the title. We get lots of descriptions of the flat, empty plains and the big big blue sky and, though a series of events, both ordinary and extraordinary, our narrator, Dell Parsons grows from boyhood to manhood. As might be expected of a novel set in a time-frame that is still fairly accessible to us (the late fifites) and in rather unexciting small Western towns, Ford's focus (ha ha!) is on the small stuff. His eye is drawn to detail, and his narrator, who admits that he's cursed with a good memory, recalls half-buried mental strategems and fleeting assumptions from most of a lifetime ago. This book isn't without it's share of action, but few readers would call it exciting. There's another side to the text, though, that's a bit more adventurous. Dell's the product of a friendly, open Alabama military man and the introverted daughter of Polish Jewish immigrants. Dell doesn't have too many thoughts about his Jewish heritage, but still muses on assimilation: how do you become part of a place? How do you become a person like other people? How does this relate to the process of maturation and of becoming an adult? In fact, the assimilation that goes on here concerns Dell's journey from the American Great Plains to the Canadian West -- which, for some writers, and, perhaps even for some residents of those places -- would seem hardly worth mentioning. But, then again, Ford's drawn to the small stuff, and he's able to use these seemingly small geographical shifts as a jumping-off points for a larger discourse about what belonging and separateness might mean. I was also impressed by Ford's evocation of childhood. Ford shows that Dell's experience as a boy of fifteen who lives in Great Falls, Montana but has failed to integrate with the town's residents in any significant way is exceptionally limited, and the events that destabilize his expected progression constitute a sort of exploring of a larger world. But Ford's also a perceptive enough writer to know that people Dell's age can be immature and mature at the same time, simultaneously wary and trusting. There's no definitive before-and-after for Dell: his development isn't always evenly paced, and the most shocking events in the novel aren't necessarily the ones that change him most. Ford seems to understand how tricky growing up can be and how amorphous young people can be at that age, too. I didn't love this one, but it's the sort of novel that I'd recommend to teachers and to those who spend their working lives among young people who are still in the process of sorting themselves out. I expect that most actual fifteen year-olds won''t have the patience for it, though.
  • (4/5)
    This book takes us into the mind of a fifteen year old boy and his time spent in the wastelands of Canada after his parents have been sent to gaol for a bank robbery and he is left to be cared for by a friend of his mothers. He is sent to Canada to escape child welfare authorities. It is the story of his survival and his observations of the strange people he comes in contact with. I enjoyed it very much as it is told from the viewpoint of the grown up Del, at the age of 66 when he has just retired after a successful career as a schoolteacher. My only complaint is that I would have liked to know more of his life after he "got away" to the city and received an education, married and had a family, as I think it would have been difficult for him to adjust.
  • (3/5)
    You know, there were a lot of things I enjoyed about this book, but it was essentially a really long string of character sketches and location descriptions so by about page 375, I was thinking "man, this is the LONGEST short story I have ever read." A teenage boy flees, in a moderate sense, to Canada after his parents commit a crime (this is brought up in the first paragraph) and he and his twin sister fear they will be put into the foster care system. That makes it sound a lot more deliberate than it was, a big theme in this book is about being a passive participant in the major events that shape one's life. Some of my three star-ness for this book is related to my personal taste -- it's a book, essentially, about being an observer, and while I wasn't bored, it did feel like I was waiting for a payout that never happened, and I'm pretty sure that was the point.I liked a lot of things about his writing, and it's my impression from reviews of this novel that the writing and the narrative voice is really the hook, but I never completely bought into it. There were some aspects of the boy's character that felt too contradictory to me (and not the kind of thing that enforces the idea that "real people are contradictory") and there were several instances where the narration simply didn't make sense. To compare him to another author, there are some times when I read Michael Chabon and come across a passage that doesn't jibe on the page when I first read it, but if I mull it over, reading it in the narrator's voice, it reveals a structure that serves to support the tone and meaning of the narrator's point of view. In this book, there were places that I stumbled as a reader and try as I might, I couldn't make them fit into the character's voice or perspective at all.
  • (3/5)
    Fifteen year old Del Parsons and his twin sister Berner seem to be living a normal enough life in 1960 Montana. Their mother is a school teacher and their father is a newly retired decorated bombardier. Their life is shattered however when their normal enough parents are arrested for bank robbery. While his sister runs away to California, Del is instead taken to Canada to live with the eccentric brother of one of his mother's friends. At first Del seems to do well enough in Canada, but as Del has already learned, people aren't always what they seem. And a normal enough life can be changed in an instant. Canada was so well reviewed that I began the novel thinking I would love it. The plot of the novel is certainly interesting and the Parson's are each quirky and interesting in their own way. The real weakness of the novel is how much time it takes for anything to happen. They are two major events that happen in Canada, neither of which is a surprise as the author lets the reader in on it well before he gets around to actually describing it in the story. But there is buildup and then there is a buildup. Unfortunately Canada spends huge chunks going over and over the same points. By the time the reader gets to the major events, any sense of drama has been totally sucked out of the story. Canada has many strong points, but maybe tighter editing could have made it truly great.
  • (2/5)
    I was aggravated by the continual delaying tactics of the narrative. Is it a style? I suppose it's a style. A writer must have an awfully big ego to believe that his readers are willing to follow him on every niggling segue. Far too much felt like empty padding. I forced myself to continue until halfway through Part Two, but reading this novel was such a chore. Usually when I'm not enjoying a book, I leave it on a park bench for someone else to have a try. This book got cracked in half and tossed in the recycling bin. I still gave it 2 stars because there were excellent descriptions and character studies.
  • (4/5)
    A book that begins with: "First, I'll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then about the murders, which happened later," is hard to turn away from. This is a wonderfully written novel, with interesting characters and an engaging protagonist. Although he is only 15 years old at the time of the story, he tells it from the perspective of 50 years later. The author manages to give us both the naivete of the boy and the perspective, sometimes wisdom, of the mature man. I enjoyed the story, but found that it, unfortunately had a tendency to drag, which is what prevents me from giving it the 5th star in my rating.
  • (2/5)
    Drawn by the title, and the author's pedigree, I came to the novel Canada as a Canadian, anticipating a story illuminating this vast and diverse country and people.Instead, what I came upon was an author trying too hard, and unsuccessfully, to channel the likes of F. Scott FitzGerald or John Steinbeck, carrying with him a typically American ignorance of Canada, its people, its culture, its heritage.The story revolves, endlessly, around a bank-robbing mother and father who, through their idiocy and sense of entitlement, leave their children, fraternal twins, barely into adolescence as orphans and essentially homeless. The novel is full of implausibilities: the fact there are no social services to take charge of the children at the time of the arrest of the parents; the smuggling of the unreliable narrator into Canada to an alleged safe house; the robbery itself. The list is just too long to enumerate here.The writing, although lauded by critics as a 'meticulous concern for the nuances of language', to this reader fell flat, lacklustre, without that alleged meticulous concern for the nuance of language. Frankly, it read as so much blah, blah, blah. In fact, the first third of the book is interminably expository, given little credence or gravitas by the nature of Ford's use of the unreliable narrator.When we finally come to the denouement, we are treated to a moment out of an old Peggy Lee song, Is That All There Is? Which is followed quickly by a complete change of scenery and time, one cannot help but feel because the author ran out of steam.The characters were so utterly cardboard as to be ridiculous.And let us not even begin to speak of the gross misunderstanding of anything to do with Canada, let alone Saskatchewan. Frankly, upon consideration, I would recommend every Canadian to pick up this novel, particularly if you're from Saskatchewan, just to explode into laughter at how wrong this writer could envisage that oceanic, wildly free geography we know as the middle province of the Prairies. Finally, good job, Richard Ford, by way of insulting every Canadian who might read this book by stating several times in the novel: Canadians are just like Americans, and, Canadians want to be just like Americans. Seriously? Next time the author of Canada wishes to write with authority about a foreign country, I suggest he actually live in that country for a period of time, immerse himself in the culture and the people, then, and only then, he might begin to approach the subject matter with some authority. But, then, maybe not. Any author who can write with sublime confidence that Canadians are just like Americans plainly hasn't a clue and should stick to writing about his own culture.
  • (4/5)
    Strange novel written from the perspective of an adolescent (who matures into a grown man) who, with his twin sister, finds himself adrift after his parents get arrested for an inept bank robbery. Before the authorities realize that the children are alone and put them into the foster care system, the sister runs away. A workplace friend of the jailed mother transports the narrator from his home in Montana to a hotel that her brother owns in a small town in Saskatchewan. A lot happens in the novel, and there's a lot for both the narrator and the reader to chew on.
  • (3/5)
    This is a compelling story of one family (two adults; two children) -- make no mistake about it. But I thought it took Richard Ford (a consummate writer, by the way) a long time to tell it.

    By the end of the story, I was exhausted. It was emotionally wrenching -- particularly from the standpoint of Dell (the boy in the story).

    I highly recommend "Canada" -- but possibly not as a first read (if you haven't already read any of Ford's other works).
  • (4/5)
    a coming of age book, the teller of the story is a 15 year boy. of course is actually told by him when he is 66, he looks back and tries to use his 15 year voice. his is molded by two crimes, a bank robbery committed by his parents and a murder by a man that is responsible after his parents go to prison. the book is set in the 60s.
  • (5/5)
    First, I'll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then about the murders, which happened later.So starts one of my most baffling reads of the year. The story of 15 year old twins Dell and Berner Parsons is told by Dell in a reflective voice from many years in the future. It is a slow read: the prose, while laconic and sparse, is powerfully descriptive and evokes a mood that puts the reader right inside the head of the narrator. The pace is anything but thrilling. However, the story is riveting because there is enough revealed in the beginning to compel the reader to continue even when the going gets tough.The characters are not the most attractive people ever portrayed. In fact, some of them are downright bizarre. The motivations of the parents are very well explained, even if they aren't very laudatory. The father's previous peripatetic military career has made it difficult for the children to develop normal childhood friendships, or participate in school activities and left them feeling detached from any sense of a permanent home. The twins themselves are as different as chocolate and vanilla. Dell is timid, completely lacking in self-confidence, and incredibly unmotivated to do anything on his own. He just wants to enroll and stay in one school and join the chess club. His sister, on the other hand, is spunky, fed-up with the status quo, and in no way willing to continue wasting her time and talents on the current model of family life. The book is divided into three parts: Part I takes place mostly in Great Falls, Montana and centers around the life of this nuclear but dysfunctional family headed by a failed salesman father who has delusions of grandeur, and his wife who doesn't have a clue about how to encourage him toward some other lifestyle. In this part, the parents commit their crimes almost as a lark, and their already fractured life really begins to unravel.The book title led me to believe it was going to be about Canada, or at least would have that country as a setting, but it was not until Part II, page 207 of 432, that Dell begins his journey to Canada. Once he gets there, we encounter one of the most bizarre collections of characters ever presented. I found this part of the story especially hard to come to grips with because all of the people who make up the adult world of Dell Parsons are just not the kind of people I'm used to dealing with. The entire section is one long day after day parade of really unbelievable situations, of ignorance and disregard of the boy, of scenes bringing to mind indentured servitude, or total parental indifference, or incredible lack of any official oversight of either child. I really couldn't say whether it gives an accurate portrayal of Canada, but it does paint stunning word pictures of the geography and scenery of Saskatchewan. It is not until the rather short Part III that we get the grown up Dell's reflections on his life and how the events shaped in Montana and then Canada resolved to allow him to become the adult he is as he tells the story. In the end, we finally come to terms with all those unconventional situations and find a character reconciling his past with the present and future.The whole time I was reading this book, my reactions ranged wildly from really liking it (particularly Ford's way with words), to wanting to throw it across the room at exasperating situations and characters. The pace was so slow that at times I felt I was wasting my time, that nothing was ever going to happen, but then I'd realize that is often how teen-agers feel about life and I was then able to climb into Dell's skin to see things from his perspective. When I finished the book, I remember feeling that this was really an exceptional achievement. It is definitely a great book, and deserves the accolades it has received. I've seen many reviewers who claim it will be a classic (whatever the current definition of that is). Richard Ford is the only writer ever to win both the Pulitzer Prize and Pen/Faulkner Award for a single novel (Independence Day) and he has given us a reading experience that will definitely remain in the memory of all who immerse themselves in his eloquent, lean and poetic words.
  • (4/5)
    In comparison to another review on here which preferred the first half of this book I think I would say that the second half was the more intriguing. Yes the first half set the scene well but it did feel like a bit of overkill. The background and the consequences of the robbery are picked over in minute detail. I definitely found this part slow going whereas the second half of the book flew by. Overall though a very thought provoking book and yes it definitely did feel emotionally draining by the end of it. Powerful stuff.
  • (5/5)
    This book was strange and beautiful.
  • (3/5)
    So. Canada. This is a book about a 15-year-old boy named Dell whose parents decide to rob a bank, which completely disrupts his and his twin sister's lives. The story is told by an older Dell looking back on the whole experience, but he manages to keep his younger self's perspective.

    It's a very quiet book. All of the strange events (bank robbery, crossing the border to run from the law, etc.) are presented very calmly. Most of the time, they're even sort of spoiled by the narrator before they even take place. But the point doesn't really seem to be to thrill the reader with the events, it's too look more closely at them and the people doing such things. That's my issue with the book, though. I don't think that it can't have both aspects.

    Almost the entire first half of the book is set up for the bank robbery that is mentioned in the first line. I wouldn't normally have that much of an issue with that (probably), but it was a lot of the narrator explaining how his parents, the robbers, are rather than showing us through their actions. Then, the second half, after the robbery actually occurs. I think I would've liked it better if it was a bit less subdued and a bit more consequential. But I can't deny that the adult characters Dell got thrown into the lives of were interesting. And I did love how Ford represented small, dying off towns. His writing isn't embellished (normally a con for me), but his descriptions of these places still left a very strong impression on me.

    So. Canada. Maybe I went in with too high of expectations. I liked the characters, I liked most of the points about people/events that the narrator made (though he didn't necessarily need to say all of them outright to us). But I found myself excited to be finished so I could go on to read something else. Not the best sign.
  • (3/5)
    For me, there was just far too much detail---Dell's remembering of 50 years ago in extreme detail, down to colors and textures and eye meanings, mouth movements. Yes, a large part of the novel happened over a very few days when the life-changing event for him occurred but it was exhausting to listen to. I kept waiting for the audio to actually get somewhere. It seemed overly long with Dell's over-analysis of everything that had happened to him as a 15 year old---yes, absolutely not normal in any stretch of the word, but also not completely great reading/listening-to material in a novel.
  • (4/5)
    A heavy mantle of foreboding hangs over much of the action of Canada, Richard Ford's masterful new novel. This is the story of Dell Parsons, who in 1960 is fifteen and growing up with his mother and father and twin sister Berner in Great Falls, Montana when the family unit is abruptly blown apart in the wake of an ill-planned and ineptly executed bank robbery committed by their parents. After their parents are arrested the resentful Berner simply walks away, apparently to forge a life for herself elsewhere. Dell waits in the passive fashion that we learn is habitual to him, and is eventually rescued by a friend of his mother, who had agreed to take both children to Canada to live with her brother in rural Saskatchewan, a place that in Ford's vision is bleak and harrowing and smouldering with repressed violence. Dell spends his time in Saskatchewan closely observing the strange people around him, keeping his emotions in check and committing himself to nothing, while trying to reinvent himself--he does not want the fact that he is the son of bank robbers to define his life. It turns out that the man into whose care he has been delivered, Arthur Remlinger, has spent years doing the same thing: struggling to emerge from the shadow of a rash act of violence committed by the passionate and idealistic youth he used to be. As Remlinger's past slowly catches up with him, we wait with Dell to see what Remlinger will do when pushed to the wall. Much of the novel explores how past acts contribute to the person we become in the present, the impossibility of denying these acts, the inescapable consequences and the need for acceptance. It is also a novel about crossing borders, physical and moral. The narrative, first person from Dell's perspective, is dark and taut, crowded with untrustworthy characters all keeping an eye on each other and filled with astute observations on human behaviour. The brief final section shows us Dell and Berner reunited fifty years after the main action, each having responded in his and her own way to their parent's fateful decision. This is a wise and profound work of fiction that you will not soon forget.
  • (4/5)
    This is one of those literary novels that mostly makes you think the author's done better work in the past. Like some of the later John Irving novels I've read it's not completely awful, but there isn't much impact to it.

    Basically in 1960 Dell Parson's parents rob a bank in North Dakota to pay off some Native Americans. The most implausible part is that no one takes the kids when the parents are arrested; they're just left there to fend for themselves even though they're 15. I don't think that would happen even in 1960 in a small Montana town. Most likely they'd have gone to the police station until a social worker could take them. But anyway, the book is called Canada because Dell ends up in Saskatchewan, in an even worse town than the one in Montana.

    The idea of fleeing to Canada would have had a lot more impact back in 1968 or so with the Vietnam War in full swing and people looking to avoid the draft. In 2013 it comes off as quaint.

    It's one of those novels too where the author uses a narrator who is probably the least interesting character in the book. This only works when the characters around that character are far more interesting, which is just not the case here.

    Anyway, for what it is the book is well written, but it really felt to me like a book out of time.

    That is all.
  • (3/5)
    Really well written book but the story is just not that entertaining. If the author writes other books they will be on my list to read but I can't enthusiastically recommend this one.
  • (4/5)
    I thought this story of a young man's life, especially after his parents' robbery, was both very interesting and well written. Richard Ford writes character well, and also provides intelligent philosophy.
  • (4/5)
    Reviews of this book are mixed - from those who call it boring and unrealistic to those who hale it as a masterpiece. My review would be somewhere between these two positions. I loved this book for its language, for its characters and for its overall storyline. I did have trouble with certain parts of the book (mainly those occurring immediately following the arrest of Dell's parents) but overall I read this book in astonishment at the author's skill.
  • (5/5)
    I finished this book with a strong feeling that Richard Ford is a very fine writer - but I find it really hard to identify what aspect of the work made me feel that way. It's a long-ish book, but there wasn't a single moment when I wished it would finish. On the other hand, it's not a page-turner that you want to keep reading to find out what happened - Ford summarizes the major dramatic events of the book in the first two sentences! Lesser writers need to keep such events secret from the reader to give an incentive to keep reading.You'll have to read what more eloquent reviewers say if you want to get a better idea why this book is so good. All I can say is that Ford's characters each have a view of the world that is very compelling in their own way. I somehow got the feeling that Richard Ford knows the way the world works.
  • (3/5)
    a story of a boy who survives the foolish acts of adults. His parents rob a bank and are arrested, his sister runs away and his mother has arranged that he is taken to Canada to live with unreliable strangers, completely alone. This is not giving anything away, the reader always knows because the boy, Del, tells you. The setting is 1960. I really had a hard time believing some of this story but then, maybe. Del was a twin. He wanted to go to school. He had interests such as bee keeping. He was a good kid. What really held me was the narration. Something about Del's voice was very compelling. It's a story that looks at marginalized life, breakdown of family and the effects of crime on the children.