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Rosemary and Rue: An October Daye Novel

Rosemary and Rue: An October Daye Novel

Написано Seanan McGuire

Озвучено Mary Robinette Kowal


Rosemary and Rue: An October Daye Novel

Написано Seanan McGuire

Озвучено Mary Robinette Kowal

оценки:
4/5 (184 оценки)
Длина:
11 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jun 8, 2010
ISBN:
9781441861733
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

The world of Faerie never disappeared: it merely went into hiding, continuing to exist parallel to our own. Secrecy is the key to Faerie's survival-but no secret can be kept forever, and when the fae and mortal worlds collide, changelings are born. Half-human, half-fae, outsiders from birth, these second-class children of Faerie spend their lives fighting for the respect of their immortal relations. Or, in the case of October "Toby" Daye, rejecting it completely. After getting burned by both sides of her heritage, Toby has denied the fae world, retreating into a "normal" life. Unfortunately for her, Faerie has other ideas.

The murder of Countess Evening Winterrose, one of the secret regents of the San Francisco Bay Area, pulls Toby back into the fae world. Unable to resist Evening's dying curse, which binds her to investigate, Toby is forced to resume her old position as knight errant to the Duke of Shadowed Hills and begin renewing old alliances that may prove her only hope of solving the mystery…before the curse catches up with her.

"[O]ne of the most successful blends of mystery and fantasy I've ever read-like Raymond Chandler by way of Pamela Dean. Toby Daye has become one of my favorite heroines, and I can't wait to read more of her continuing adventures." -T. A. Pratt, author of Dead Reign

Издатель:
Издано:
Jun 8, 2010
ISBN:
9781441861733
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Seanan McGuire is the author of Every Heart a Doorway, the October Daye urban fantasy series, the InCryptid series, and several other works, both standalone and in trilogies. She also writes darker fiction as Mira Grant. She was the winner of the 2010 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and in 2013 she became the first person ever to appear five times on the same Hugo ballot.


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  • (3/5)
    I feel like this book had greatness potential... Then fell short.
  • (4/5)
    3.5, but probably closer to 4 stars, so definitely rounding up here.

    i think i'm going to end up starting every review of a new series the same way here: there's a lot of filler crap on the UF bookshelf, so it's nice to find something that's not a rehash of something else you've already read or head-scratchingly silly. our heroine this go-around is a part-sidhe "changeling", called on by an old acquaintance to solve a murder; sleuthing ensues, as is somewhat standard in this genre. october is a minor player in the local supernatural scene, so a good chunk of the book is her rushing around SF asking for help from a colorful cast of characters, some of which feel as though they're only there because they sounded like a good idea in the author's head (i'm looking at you, here, Tybalt).

    all of which makes it sound pretty meh. not so; anything that can keep me solidly entertained such that i devour the whole book in 2 short sittings has to be a fairly well put-together tale. there's a LOT of backstory that's only hinted at, so there's plenty of room for these characters to stretch out, and i'm left wanting more of this world. i've got the 2nd one waiting here, and i'm certainly planning on seeing where McGuire goes with her version of faerie.
  • (4/5)
    October Daye is a Changeling, half-fae Daoine Sidhe, half-human. She's also a private detective. When a case finds her on the wrong side of some very powerful, very nasty people, she winds up spending time with the fishes - literally. When she finally gets out of the pond, the world is a very different place, and her old life is dead, gone, smoldering wreckage. Toby'd like nothing better than to disappear into the woodwork of life, but unfortunately a friend has been murdered, and Toby has two choices: find the killer, or die.Definitely makes my "find the next installment" list.
  • (3/5)
    At first I had some trouble getting through this book. The book starts out with the main character being depressed over some admittedly devastating setbacks she has endured. Fine, I understand she's depressed, but it very quickly started grating on my nerves. When she gets cursed to solve a murder, she fortunately gets over it, and then the book picks up. It has an intriguing world, with faeries and half-faeries mixing with the regular world. October Daye is a half-faerie detective. Since she is only half faerie, her magic is quite weak, which I found a bit annoying. I've read enough books about people running themselves into the ground trying to do too much, and 'Toby' is a classical example. On top of that she's not even competent: she gets herself shot three times that I can remember, and continuously needs to be patched up or rescued by her friends. I would have preferred her to be a bit more self-reliant, or, if she has to rely on her friends and allies, to at least rely on them beforehand, by Planning and Asking For Help At Judicious Times, instead of by Blundering Into Things And Hoping Allies Are Nearby To Pick You Up. Ah well, despite of all that, I did enjoy the book.
  • (4/5)
    I love finding new authors and it turns out that Seanan McGuire wasn't even new to me (I've read her Newsflesh trilogy, written as Mira Grant) but her urban fantasy was. As soon as I started reading Rosemary and Rue, I promptly fell in love with it. And I felt falling for the book (and Tybalt, of course) as I was reading. I adore this book and I desperately need to read the rest of this series. October Daye is fast becoming one of my favorite strong female cahracters.
  • (3/5)
    I'm just going to add my voice to those people who thought that this book started out strong and lost some steam as it went toward an ultimately mediocre ending.I enjoy the character Toby even though she is a moping dingle head, but her reaction to Devin and his tendency to rape and abuse lost half breed teen seems completely incomprehensible.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book a lot. I liked the faerie mythology and world building. Poor Toby. She's cursed as a fish for 14 years, misses the 90s, can't understand modern technology well enough to hold down a decent job now that she's in the new century, and since she's a changeling--half human, half faerie--she doesn't fit in anywhere regardless of the decade.She gets pulled into investigating a murder of a good friend, and in the course of a few days she gets shot at I don't know how many times, beat up, chased, cursed, betrayed, and disappoints or offends nearly everyone that comes near her, including her cats; I just don't know how she manages to survive. This was a very entertaining story and I'm looking forward to reading more in the series.Plus, I really want a rose goblin. So, so cute.
  • (4/5)
    This is the first book in the October Daye series.I enjoyed this book. The world-building is well done. I don't know San Francisco well, but I had the feeling that, if I did, the setting would have made perfect sense.The opening scene sets up a major conflict that isn't addressed in the rest of the book, which leaves room for things to build as the series progresses.The rest of the book is a fairly straighforward paranormal mystery, which is well-written and comes to a satisfactory conclusion.The only reason I didn't give this book 5 stars is that none of the characters really came alive to me. They aren't badly written, or cardboard, but just didn't breathe. However, I'll be checking out the rest of the series, so they may grow on me.
  • (4/5)
    It is a testament to how incredibly good they are that whenever I read myself to a stopping place in the series (i.e. the last published book - so that I have to wait for McGuire's writing to catch up with my reading), the world becomes a sadder place. Patience is never my strong suit. I began reading the October Daye series largely because I love the Newsflesh series so much (first book is Feed, by Mira Grant, McGuire's pseudonym). I am now hooked into this one as well, though to a lesser extent. Toby Daye's world is reminiscint of Charles De Lint's, with more of an emphasis on Celtic folklore and more believable, multi-dimensional characters. Toby is a faery knight cum private investigator, and she never runs out of crimes to solve, thanks to the faery-world's Macchiavellian royal court system and abundance of shady characters. There is a lot of backstory that is revealed in tantalizing little bits - and even more, the further you get into the series. McGuire has said on occasion, on her blog, or in interviews, that she admires Stephen King, and I can see it. As a would-be writer myself, I admire her, because she's learned a lot of King's tricks without copying him in any way. She is very much her own voice. This is a smart fantasy book series, and I think you all should read it.
  • (2/5)
    October (Toby) Daye was an up-and-coming private investigator with a husband and young daughter at home counting on her to come back in one piece. And things were going well enough until she ran into a bad guy that put her out of commission for 14 years. Finally back on her own two feet, Toby's left with a new reality where her husband and daughter want nothing to do with her. Disillusioned with her old life, Toby's turned her back on the P.I. business and is barely making a go of it as an overnight cashier at the local convenience store. That is until Evelyn Winters, an old friend, is brutally murdered and it's up to Toby to find out who's responsible.This sort of sounds like any other tough lady detective story, but Rosemary and Rue offers up a twist. Toby isn't just any other P.I., she's a changeling. Her mother was a pureblood fairy who decided to play housewife with a mortal man. The baddie that knocked her out of the loop for so long wasn't a standard villain, he was a pureblood who thought it would be amusing to turn Toby into a fish. She spent those 14 years in a koi pond with no recollection of who or what she truly was. Evelyn Winters was thousands of years old and, knowing her murder was coming soon, placed a curse on Toby. Toby is now compelled to solve this murder or she will be joining Ms. Winters in the great beyond.This was a fun little urban fantasy, but parts of it left me a bit cold. In one scene Toby battles with a doppelgänger in her living room, a gun is hidden behind the curtain only a few feet away. Toby knows the gun is there, but rather than grab it she runs to her bedroom where there's no escape. If she's as smart and sassy as she's written, she would have made a dive for the gun. It made no sense. She also has a confusing love/hate relationship with a weirdo who runs a flop house where she used to live. It's made clear that the guy is a creep, requiring sex as payment for favors from most of his young wards. He's just slimy. And still our headstrong heroine is stealing kisses from him even as she's promising one of his new victims that she'll help her escape. I was baffled. It was a quick read and had won a Hugo, so I stuck through to the end. I don't regret that I read it but I doubt I'll be finishing the series.
  • (1/5)
    This book has everything I hate and nothing I love about urban fantasy: a tough-talking and ultimately useless heroine with an irrelevant Tragic Past, a why-are-you-trying-to-write-this-character-as-sexy (and failing so hard!) abusive bad boy ex-boyfriend, inaccurate whining about San Francisco, a terrible excuse for a mystery, European fairies in America with no mention of anyone or anything indigenous, and especially, a serious case of whiteness.Everyone in this book is white. Thousands-year-old fairy queen of Northern California? White. Kitsune lady? White. Half-human half-fairy? All white all the time! Half-fairy with an "inner city Spanish accent?" Flowing golden locks! The only person who could be read as non-white (described with black hair) is Lily, the undine who runs the Japanese Tea Gardens. With sexy robes, passivity, and controlling tendencies.Beyond that, October Daye is not an interesting heroine. She has a chronic case of stupid. She has no drive. Her banter sucks. McGuire tries to show us that she's not a Mary Sue by having someone beat her up every five pages, but unfortunately, she's not Jim Butcher, and Toby is no Harry Dresden. And while urban fantasy is definitely a character-driven genre, it would be nice if the plot made a little sense. Most of the action is Toby getting beaten up and realizing that omg, someone wants to kill her! (Yes, we maybe have picked up on that by now!) None of it moves the plot forward.We've been discussing a "staff unrecommends" at the bookstore where I work. This one definitely goes there.
  • (5/5)
    I haven't been fully grabbed by other urban fantasy books that deal with the fae, but this one snared me from the very start. Toby is a fantastic protagonist who feels more human than fairy, and that humanity makes it easy to sympathize with her as she is attacked and brutalized and snubbed by the high echelons of the hidden side of San Francisco. Now I have yet another series I want to continue. No wonder my to-do stack is out of control.
  • (1/5)
    October "Toby" Daye is a half-human, half-faerie changeling living in modern day San Francisco with her human (and faerie-oblivious) boyfriend and their mostly-human kid. The novel begins with a prologue: in 1995, Toby is trying to solve the mysterious kidnapping of a faerie Duke's wife and daughter. She bumbles into a trap set by the perps, and ends up cursed to live as a fish in a koi pond in Golden Gate Park. For fourteen years. Sounds like a good beginning, right? Magic, mystery, intrigue... We are re-introduced to Toby about 6 months after her de-enchantment. She's itching to get revenge on the people who put the carp in her diem, solve the 14-year-old kidnapping mystery, and reunite with her family.Except, no. She's not itching to do any of that. She's working the night shift in a convenience store and avoiding everything to do with her former life. She ends up investigating a murder mystery which has no apparent connection to any of the events in the prologue. (And by the way, I don't know how she ever got her private investigator's license, because most of her investigative techniques seem to involve little more than getting knocked unconscious.) Even here, in the urgent pursuit of a killer, there are buckets and buckets of backstory mucking up the plot rather than contributing to it. Overall, the balance between backstory and this-story felt lopsided to me. Too much tell, not enough show. Recommended only for people who prefer to spell fairy as faerie.
  • (4/5)
    Seanan McGuire has introduced me to another world I am eager to visit - fae both hidden, and seperate, from the mortal world. While there were a lot of details to absorb I think McGuire managed to weave the rules, inhabitants and information quite skilfully into the story.Suprisingly magic plays less of a role than I expected, but there was non stop action and while i did really enjoy it, I also think it overwhelmed the plot, particularly the mystery, a little too much. Poor Toby gets shot on 3 different occassions, beat up, nearly drowns, nearly suffocates etc all in a just a few days.Toby is an interesting character, more flawed than many heroines of the genre but still very likeable. I would have liked her to be a bit more proactive in her "quest" and take definate action instead, as Toby admits, simply reacting to the situations she finds herelf in. We are introduced to a raft of other characters - some vital to this story, while others seem to be set up for later books.I think there is a lot to like about this new series, enough that I've ordered the second
  • (5/5)
    October Daye is a changeling, a half-human, half-fae who is stuck between two worlds. After being cursed for fourteen years to live as a fish in the Japanese Tea Gardens in San Francisco, October is thrown back into a new life where her fiancee and daughter have moved on without her. After a close fae friend, and Queen, dies mysteriously, October searches for the woman's killer and returns to the world she would rather leave behind.I'm not sure where to start with this book. I loved practically everything about it. The writing was vivid, rich and seemed to flow effortlessly between sentences and scenes. The dialog was fun, realistic and made the characters jump off the page. The characters were fabulous. Each one was unique, and I could feel their emotions living inside the book. Particularly October, even though she tends to seem a little pathetic and somewhat emo at points, felt like a truly multi-faceted characters with realistic (well, as realistic as you can get with an urban fantasy) problems. I was especially happy that October seemed to have viable motivations for her actions, rather than just doing something purely for the purposes of advancing the plot.McGuire's world-building is phenomenal. It's one of the best I've read this year. McGuire has the amazing ability to build the world and explain its mechanics to the reader while still moving the plot forward and not dumping pages of information onto the reader at once. McGuire seamlessly integrates her own mythology, based off traditional Celtic lore, into the real city of San Francisco, and blends the two together into a unique world for the universe of October Daye.Fans of paranormal romance beware. There is some romance in this novel, but it is not a major part of the plot at all. October does not have a love interest (just an ex). I found this very refreshing for an urban fantasy/mystery novel, but readers who are looking for romance shouldn't expect it here.The only tiny issue I had with this book is that it felt like October spent much of her time in the middle of the book running between different faery locations for no other reason than for McGuire to introduce more of her world. There were plot reasons, but they seemed a tiny bit thin...but that's being really picky.But in summary: loved this book. Can't wait for the sequel!
  • (2/5)
    Not a series I will be continuing. I didn't care for the writing or the mostly cheesy wit at the oddest moments. For example, if there is a horrible creature about to kill you, its not likely you would engage in inane conversation such as Beast: "Guess what I'm going to do to you" Heroine: "Oh, I don't know, leave me alone?" Beast: "Are you stupid?" Heroine"Oh a lot of people would say I am stupid" Without this type of dialog, I would have enjoyed the story a lot more, even with the extremely slow moving plot. I really wanted to like this book. I usually love reading about the fae, but one of my pet peeves is cheesy dialog and this book had an over abundance of it. I'm giving it 2 stars because it would have been an interesting enough story if it had been written differently.
  • (5/5)
    An excellent urban fantasy read. I can't wait to read the next October Daye novel.
  • (5/5)
    Fun read. Even more fun if you know the San Francisco Bay Area and the SCA.
  • (4/5)
    Faerie is around the corner in this well designed world . October Daye is one of the inhabitants of this world a half-faerie, who has constructed a life for herself with a husband and child and a job of detective when she is turned into a fish for several years. When she comes out the pond she finds herself displaced and wants as little as possible to do with her past life, it hurts to have missed so much.
  • (2/5)
    This book was very disappointing to me. Just as I began to get into the story, it skips to ten years hence. Everything is different and the protagonist hero is suddenly zero. It was so jarring, I couldn't keep reading. It frustrated me that the author gave readers an enticing set-up, then took it all away. I can only assume the protagonist spent the rest of the book rebuilding herself, but that's not what I wanted to read.
  • (4/5)
    Rosemary & Rue is the first installment in the October Daye series- and what a fresh start! Dark, wicked and creative. The story begins with a prologue set in 1995, October "Toby" Daye is on a stake out. She's tracking a man who is believed to have kidnapped her liege's wife and daughter. Unfortunately for her, she is caught and subsequently turned into a Koi fish... flopping into a pond where she spends the next 14 years. She left behind a human who stole her heart, Cliff, and her daughter Gillian. Both refuse her when she returns all these years later... leaving her numb and willingly ready to avoid her life as a Changeling.Our stubborn heroine is determined to live a life of loneliness, but fate has other plans for her. Her extremely old, powerful, pureblood fae frienemy has been slaughtered... And with her last dieing breath, she releases a curse that forces Toby to avenge her death or die trying. The curse throws her back into the world she has given up on- and she meets both old and new enemies, friends... fun, fae creatures. She's shot, beaten and even stabbed on her new adventure to find justice for her friend. Lucky for us, we get to watch first hand as she battles it out and finds the truth behind the gruesome murder. Now, I wasn't quite expecting the killer to be who it was- though others say they saw it coming from a mile away. Not sure if I should have admitted that ;) That being said, for me, the ending was solid.Although I thoroughly enjoyed this book, I do have a couple complaints. I felt like I was getting information dumped on me and it was quite repetitive at times. Wordy. For some reason (the plot) I was able to over look this and love the book despite these "flaws" and just could not put it down. I grew tiresome of hearing how magic smelled by the end of the book. At the same time though, I wish the fae would have been given more in depth descriptions, rather than the magic or environment. Now, what I truly loved about this book was the defeatist attitude that Toby sported at the start of the story. Slowly her attitude improves, we get to watch her evolve from a hurt, numb half-fae to someone who is looking forward to finding who she once was again. Her character had some depth, but was hard to relate to. Blame this on the wordiness of the text. The next books to come are sure to have less information dumping, so I look forward to relating more with Toby then. (Don't get me wrong- She was likable!) This book was packed to the brim with world building. It did cause minor distraction from the plot, but it was entertaining. Seanan did a beautiful job, and I can't wait to read the next installments! Strongly recommend this book to those that love the Fae and Urban Fantasy.
  • (5/5)
    I read this a few weeks ago, but wasn't sure how I would write a review that would do this justice. I honestly still don't think I will do the book justice, but I want to write the review before the new year. This is one of my favorite books of the year. This is an amazing, intelligent, action packed story that I could not put down once I started it. Well, I had to put it down to sleep at some point, but I didn't want to. Toby gets sucked back into the fae world and she really is just trying to fit in where she can in the human world. She's half of both worlds and wanted by neither. There is a changeling world that she can belong, but she'd rather not. The whole book exhausted me and I can't imagine how Toby kept going after each ass kicking she got and gave. She has friends where she least expects them and enemies everywhere. I loved seeing the ways of the Faerie world, scary as it had a tendency to be. I really look forward to the rest of the series as it comes out and anything else Seanan McGuire writes. It looks like she has a whole bunch of books out in the new year. YAY! Five fantabulous changeling beans.....
  • (5/5)
    Edgy and just dark enough to be enjoyable without loosing any of the "lighter" elements that a modern fairy-tale can have. I can't wait to read the next book!I did, however, dislike the weakness of the changelings compared to the true fae. It would have been better to see some compensation for the weakness in magical powers with something else.
  • (4/5)
    It takes place in San Francisco, in the present day. Our heroine, October "Toby" Daye is a Changeling - half human, half fae. She is trying to pass as human, but that requires a little bit of magic, to round the corners of her ears and cheekbones. It's working, mostly, and has a husband, a daughter, and a job as a Private Investigator. That is, until a surveillance gig goes wrong, and she spends the next 14 years as a koi in a pond in Golden Gate Park. The shape shifting eventually wears off. That is where the story begins. She is pulled into a murder investigation, and can't seem to get a break. But it allows the reader to see this world of the fae that co-exists with our San Francisco, and meet the people / fae who shaped Toby into who she is now. Lots of action, some interesting characters, but not fully engaging. I give it 4 stars out of 5.
  • (4/5)
    McGuire gets an A+ for world-building. I loved the unique combination of murder mystery, gritty urban fantasy, and Medieval courtliness of the Faerie world. Although the movement of the plot gets bogged down by description and details, the creativity of the setting and interesting characters pull the reader along. Shakespeare fans will enjoy the numerous references and parallels to his plays. Overall, it was entertaining and intriguing enough for me to definitely want to read the second book in the series.
  • (4/5)
    October (Toby) Daye has it rough. The world of fairy still lives, hiding along side the human world. As a changeling (half human, half fairy), she is second-class and hated by most pure blood fairies. A betrayal strips her of any desire to be a par of the fairy world, and she's living in avoidance of everyone and everything she once knew. Things get really rough when the Countess Winterrose is murdered. Before she dies, she curses Toby, pulling her back into the fairy world and forcing Toby to find her murders. Seanan is brutal to her main character. Toby more often gets her ass kicked than kicks ass. However that does not diminish her awesome. Toby has enough sass and self conviction to burn. Every time she's knocked down, she recovers and keeps going. Nothing diminishes her drive. There are certainly abundant flaws, but this is really a fun, snappy read, and from what I've heard the subsequent books in the series just get better from here.
  • (4/5)
    A good book - not quite very good. I like the setting and the society(s), and of course I find the Bay Area setting fun since it's local to me. Toby spends just a little too much time agonizing over stuff, though. It rides the edge between gritty and grim - and while I don't mind gritty I dislike grim. I will definitely look for the next book and see where Seanan takes it, but I got burned with Saintcrow's Dante Valentine stories recently where things just kept getting worse. Toby's a lot better off at the end of this book than she was at the beginning, in both obvious and subtle ways, so that's an argument that things won't just slide downhill. I'll have to see. This story starts with Toby losing to an enemy and suffering serious losses - fourteen years of her life, for one thing. Her business, her SO and daughter. And, from her own guilt and anger, all her friendships and other relationships with the Fae (she's a half-blood Fae, and the case that knocked her out was a Fae one). Then crisis happens and she's drawn back into that world. Where she begins to discover that she misjudged a lot of things, both in cutting off her relationships and in what some of those relationships actually were. Various and sundry adventures ensue, including several near-successful attempts to kill her, a lost treasure, and a lot of new understandings of old friends and enemies (some improved, some worsened). But she does rebuild her life - or rather, take up the parts she can and go on to build a new one. There are traces of the (also highly annoying) trope where the heroine is desperately desired by just about every man she comes in contact with - Connor, Devin, and (heavy hinting) Tybalt are all trying to lure her. Yawn. I don't know. I like the story in many ways, and dislike it in almost as many. Well, gotta read the next one and find out how it goes...
  • (1/5)
    Just too silly for me. Could not get into the fairy land theme ; could not finish the book.
  • (5/5)
    A new voice in the ever growing world of Urban Fantasy. Admittedly, The nifty looking orange title and the curious looking androgynous figure on the front had more to do with my picking it up than any desire for a new taste in an abundant field. We have a spunky and hapless heroine in Toby, and while she's not as ditsy as, say Betsy the Vampire Queen, She's neither as Ruthless as Anita Blake or suave as Meredith Gentry. She's a nice and happy medium between all these. Actually, thats wrong, she's a sad medium. The story begins in the 80's with a rather twistedly quirky tragedy that baffled me. It picks up again in the present day with an evidently beat down character and I was surprised to find that the story was not about Toby regaining what she'd lost in the beginning. It was a nice touch, threw me for a loop and keep me hooked while promising me a much bigger story than what I knew was in those 346 pages. And the preview in the back proves that there is indeed, a series to be had out of this new world. And quite a complex world it is too. Most of the mystery in the story is unfolded in equal parts police work, extensive characterization and expose on the half hidden world of faerie in San Fran. I believed everyone, the plot was arrow straight and practical while still being able to lead me by the nose 'cause I had no idea where it was going till the last minute. By the end, like any good story should do, I wanted more. The only real problem I have with it is that I don't quite buy that her family would cut her off the way they did; it's the only unrealistic and unexplainable thing I found in this fairy tale. =
  • (4/5)
    Rosemary and Rue: An October Daye NovelSeanan McGuireDAW (2009), Paperback, 368 pagesDrat it, Seanan! You really do make it hard to not write a spoiler filled review! I shall endeavor to do your craft the credit it deserves. SighRosemary and Rue may be Seanan’s debut novel, but is FAR from the beginning of her writing career. As a writer who has her quill in all manner of projects, from novels to writing – and singing – baudy songs, to doing what she does in her ‘other life’ (which benefits many people greatly) she’s always processing huge amounts of information to be used later. And she eventually will find a place for every single scrap of it. I know she will!Having said that, R&R is a complicated story from the start, as we discover Toby, a half-bred human/fairy, trying to put things together after spending a considerable amount of time rather inconveniently indisposed after the PI assignment she was working goes terribly wrong. As a Private Investigator in San Francisco she handles all kind of cases, from the mundane missing mutt to the crafty dealings of the Fae. She settles down to a ‘relatively’ normal life, working at Safeway, because her PI license was suspended during her unexplained absence, and comes home one morning (liking the night shift) to find a message that embroils her in an investigation – whether she likes it or not. This is something that she can’t walk away from, and has her ranging the locales of San Francisco as well as the ways to the Faerie Lands. You see, she’s not just Toby Daye, the worst night clerk Safeway had ever seen, she’s also October Daye, Knight of the Shadowed Hills, in service to His Grace, Duke Sylvester Torquill of the Shadowed Hills and the Daoine Sidhe.. You just know it’s going to get complicated.Ms McGuire writes a complex and crafty tale… far too much to be one book, or even the three that are currently contracted for. There are a lot of loose threads hanging around this tapestry, but I believe, given the opportunity, Seanan will skillfully weave them all together in as many books as it takes. When she does, it will be a truly spectacular tapestry.Overall; 4 Stars (hate to dock you that star, but there are still too many things running around loose in here. One of them probably carried it off -- are Rose Goblins like raccoons and find *Shiny* things irresistable?)