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Among the Mad: A Maisie Dobbs Novel

Among the Mad: A Maisie Dobbs Novel

Написано Jacqueline Winspear

Озвучено Orlagh Cassidy


Among the Mad: A Maisie Dobbs Novel

Написано Jacqueline Winspear

Озвучено Orlagh Cassidy

оценки:
4.5/5 (57 оценки)
Длина:
9 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 17, 2009
ISBN:
9781427206060
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

In the thrilling new novel by the New York Times bestselling author of An Incomplete Revenge, Maisie Dobbs must catch a madman before he commits murder on an unimaginable scale.

It's Christmas Eve 1931. On the way to see a client, Maisie Dobbs witnesses a man commit suicide on a busy London street. The following day, the prime minister's office receives a letter threatening a massive loss of life if certain demands are not met—and the writer mentions Maisie by name. After being questioned and cleared by Detective Chief Superintendent Robert MacFarlane of Scotland Yard's elite Special Branch, she is drawn into MacFarlane's personal fiefdom as a special adviser on the case.

Meanwhile, Billy Beale, Maisie's trusted assistant, is once again facing tragedy as his wife, who has never recovered from the death of their young daughter, slips further into melancholia's abyss. Soon Maisie becomes involved in a race against time to find a man who proves he has the knowledge and will to inflict death and destruction on thousands of innocent people. And before this harrowing case is over, Maisie must navigate a darkness not encountered since she was a nurse in wards filled with shell-shocked men.

In Among the Mad, Jacqueline Winspear combines a heart-stopping story with a rich evocation of a fascinating period to create her most compelling and satisfying novel yet.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 17, 2009
ISBN:
9781427206060
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Jacqueline Winspear is the author of the New York Times bestselling Maisie Dobbs series, which includes In This Grave Hour, Journey to Munich, A Dangerous Place, Leaving Everything Most Loved, Elegy for Eddie, and eight other novels. Her standalone novel, The Care and Management of Lies, was also a New York Times bestseller and a Dayton Literary Peace Prize finalist. Originally from the United Kingdom, she now lives in California.

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  • (3/5)
    I really like this series but I didn't care for this latest book quite as much as some of the others. Don't get me wrong, I still recommend it but I think readers are supposed to come away from the book with more compassion for those with mental illness, but that didn't work for me because the mentally ill characters weren't very likable.
  • (5/5)
    Maisie Dobbs, psychologist/investigator, witnesses a random suicide on the streets of London. Then, she is summoned to join a high-powered team to assist in finding the writer of a threatening letter to the government, in which her name was specifically mentioned. Due to some characteristics of the letter, Maisie wonders if the suicide and the letter have a connection.I have enjoyed all of the Maisie Dobbs mysteries, but this one is my favorite after the first one. There is a great deal of psychology involved, especially relating to the minds of WWI veterans. I found it sad, yet interesting and educational. It makes me wonder about our veterans of today. Are their needs being met?Maisie's intelligence, tenderness and attitude creates such a wonderful character. Her supporting characters offer accuracy to the timeframe in regard to employment, friendships and the government, let alone adding to the continuing story line. And last, but not least - the narrator, Orlagh Cassidy, was superb.Originally posted on: Thoughts of Joy
  • (4/5)
    Same as the others. This series is like a very long single novel w/ a very even pace. I find it hard to believe that it would be possible to pay one's rent in London by begging, even in 1932. This book taught me the phrase "Mills bomb".
  • (4/5)
    I loved how the different strands of the story - Maisie's personal life, her work associates, and her case - all interweave and illuminate the central idea of mental illness and how we manage or don't manage it and where it often has its roots. Laid on top of these very real concerns is an exciting thriller with echos to the chemical warfare horrors of WWI.
  • (5/5)
    Outstanding - continued excellence with the character building of Maisie Hobbs and friends. This book also introduced new characters who I am guessing will make appearances in future episodes. The actual mystery in this novel was well done and as always, done with an historical realism that is second to none. Favorite series.
  • (3/5)
    always enjoyable.
  • (5/5)
    Well, Jacqueline didn't disappoint...no surprises there.

    Maisie and Billy observe a Christmas Eve suicide, and as the events unfold as to why this once brave soldier decided to take his life, they are drawn into another mystery. Will Maisie and Scottland Yard figure out the mystery before more lives are taken?

    Excellent series.
  • (3/5)
    I didn't enjoy this Maisie Dobbs as much as previous books. Ms. Winspear loves to dwell on the casualties of war, especially from the Great War, but this book seems to dwell a little too much. And there is no clear resolution to the case either, so that detracts from it considerably. In this book Maisie finds herself working with Special Branch and Section 5 and there's a little more espionage in this one than previously. Her group is trying to uncover a particularly sadistic killer who has nothing left to live for, and doesn't care what happens to him. The book is set around Christmas in 1931. It's a particularly gloomy Christmas season in London that year and the tone of that is reflected in this book. I just wish that Maisie would lighten up a wee bit. It would make the books much more enjoyable.
  • (4/5)
    This series has really grown on me. I enjoyed this one. As usual the plot comes from the consequences of the First World War but it sadly has resonance for now too. A lot less time is spent on description of clothing which improves the writing no end and Maisie is changing and leaving her grief behind.
  • (4/5)
    Jacqueline Winspear's Maisie Dobbs books always provoke thought on the part of the reader. This book has a darker outlook than most, dealing as it does with people severely damaged by human conflict in the first world war. It also subtly points out that some things never change in terms of how government agencies operate. Intrigue and back-stabbing have been around forever. It's a good read, but don't expect a particularly cheery feeling at the end. The good news is that Maisie has pulled herself back together again.
  • (5/5)
    Maisie sets an example of how intelligence, problem solving and compassion can be complementary.
  • (5/5)
    This series gets better and better. Depth of characters, thoughtful, well-plotted. Love Maisie's dad, wish we saw more of him.
  • (4/5)
    Another good Maisie Dobbs - I enjoyed her being 'elevated' to working with some higherups at Scotland Yard and she being able to show her talents to an appreciative audience. The side plot about Billy's wife was hard to read sometimes, but I appreciated that the author (obviously) did research on depression in women at the time, and included it in the story.
  • (4/5)
    When Maisie witnesses a man blow himself up she gets caught up in a government investigation into the situation, with a lot of complicated politics and a look at the treatment of the disabled veterans in the period (which was appalling by the way) and touches on the development of psychiatric services, for both the shell-shocked and for Billy's wife who has never recovered from the death of their daughter.It's an interesting glimpse into the world of the period through slightly modern eyes. There are times when it reflects things quite well and then there are times when the writing about the future is writ large. It's an interesting read, sometimes I wonder about how stretched Maisie is sometimes and how she copes with juggling a lot of stuff.
  • (4/5)
    Jacqueline Winspear's Maisie Dobbs books always provoke thought on the part of the reader. This book has a darker outlook than most, dealing as it does with people severely damaged by human conflict in the first world war. It also subtly points out that some things never change in terms of how government agencies operate. Intrigue and back-stabbing have been around forever. It's a good read, but don't expect a particularly cheery feeling at the end. The good news is that Maisie has pulled herself back together again.
  • (4/5)
    In what is possibly my favorite installment to date, Maisie is called upon to assist Special Branch of Scotland Yard in an investigation in which a man is using chemical warfare similar to what she had encountered in World War I. She had tried to prevent a man from blowing himself up and had been witnessed by the letter writer who mentioned her name in his threat. At the same time Billy's wife Doreen has been committed to an old school mental hospital because her sadness in the loss of her daughter has grown to the point that she is a danger to herself and possibly to others. Maisie immediately works to get Doreen transferred to an institution with more up to date methods. The book deals with the treatment of veterans, particularly those who suffered shell shock and illnesses brought own by exposure to chemical weaponry. It also takes a look at the mental health system of the day. There is a potential for a continuing relationship in future installments of this series. Great installment!
  • (3/5)
    Although I enjoy the Maisie Dobbs series and will continue to read these book, I must say this was not one of my favorite installments. This book takes Maisie deep into the world of mental health care in the early 1930s. A disenfranchised war veteran who is able to make chemical weapons is threatening to attack the entire city within a matter of days and has, inexplicably, mentioned Maisie Dobbs in the first of several threatening letters. When dead animals that have apparently been gassed begin to show up, the race against the clock becomes all the more urgent.Thus Maisie is brought under the umbrella of the Special Branch and MI-5 and even has a tete a tete with the PM, all while racing to save the city. There wasn't enough mystery, to put it bluntly. Although Winspear has, as always, thoroughly researched the time period and how mental health was administered, it was fairly obvious from the beginning what was going on. There is some good character/plot development with the Beales, however. Fans of the series will enjoy this book, as I did, but it may not be the most memorable of Maisie's adventures.
  • (5/5)
    Maisie Dobbs, now in 1931. Top notch.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this one the most so far... Maisie's continuing to come into her own and making friends, of a sort, which is getting her out and about and making her less self-absorbed. The series is picking up!
  • (4/5)
    Maisie Dobbs is helping Scotland Yard try to find who is making treats to some of England's leaders. Maisie tries to prevent a man from blowing himself up and this ties into the letter received by Scotland Yard with the treats. The letter mentions Maisie's name and this is why she is brought into the case. This book is timely as it also looks at how veterans are treated after war, even though this is World War I. I love how Maisie thinks in solving the crime and goes out on her own to find the truth.
  • (5/5)
    2009, MacMillan Audio, Read by Orlagh CassidyPublisher’s Summary: It's Christmas Eve 1931. On the way to see a client, Maisie Dobbs witnesses a man commit suicide on a busy London street. The following day, the prime minister's office receives a letter threatening a massive loss of life if certain demands are not met – and the writer mentions Maisie by name. After being questioned and cleared by Detective Chief Superintendent Robert MacFarlane of Scotland Yard's elite Special Branch, she is drawn into MacFarlane's personal fiefdom as a special adviser on the case.Meanwhile, Billy Beale, Maisie's trusted assistant, is once again facing tragedy as his wife, who has never recovered from the death of their young daughter, slips further into melancholia's abyss. Soon Maisie becomes involved in a race against time to find a man who proves he has the knowledge and will to inflict death and destruction on thousands of innocent people.My Review: Among the Mad is perhaps the best of the Maisie Dobbs novels I’ve read to date. These just keep getting better! The novel looks in depth at the devastating lifelong effects of war on the psyche as well as the body, and at some of the horrid chemical gases used in combat to obliterate human life. Stephen Oliver is one such brilliant mind, employed in the war for his scientific knowledge, but all but destroyed by what he witnessed. Too, the novel looks at the treatment of the mentally ill through Billy Beale’s wife’s malaise since the death of their young daughter – Doreen’s experiences illustrate some of the inhumane treatments employed to shock those suffering from melancholia back into reality. And it is a pleasure to observe Maisie, working with Scotland Yard as well as the Secret Service, hold her own in a man’s world. Highly recommended!
  • (4/5)
    Another great mystery...but I wonder about the next book and if Maisie might be getting a beau?
  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    In this installment we find Maisie racing against time to stop a terrorist, think the Unabomber type before he kills again. Cute little animals and people are not safe while this psychopath is on the loose. Yes, the descriptions of those poor little doggies unfortunate ends disturbed me even more than the junior prime minister's death. I must say though that the description of his untimely demise was particularly grisly for a Maisie Dobbs novel. At the same time this is happening, poor Billy Beale is dealing with the mental breakdown of his wife Doreen who cannot get over the death of their little girl Lizzie. I still maintain that Maisie should have done more to help Lizzie when she knew that she was sick and that Billie couldn't afford to take her to the doctor. At least now Maisie pulls some strings to get Doreen out of the medieval institution she has been taken to and into a more modern psychiatric facility that can help her. It was nice to see a more caring side of Maisie again. She even took time out to help poor Priscilla who is still having trouble adjusting to the loss of her entire family despite the fact that she now has her own children. It was also nice to see Maisie finally getting the respect she deserves from the boys at Scotland Yard. The one thing I don't like is Maisie's relationship with potential suitors. Poor inspector Stratton is always cut off at the pass. I get that Maisie misses Simon but she always seems so standoffish when it comes to love relationships. I would like to see her expand in that area. Two more novels to go and I'm off to The Mapping Love and Death.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Jacqueline Winspear’s Maisie Dobbs series is a particular favorite and this, the sixth novel, did not disappoint. Admittedly, I have struggled to connect with other author’s historical mystery series, but that has never been the case with Maisie Dobbs; they seem to get better with each new addition.The setting takes us to familiar territory for fans of the series. The time period is the holiday season of late December 1931 and January 1932 in and around the city of London, England. In this installment, an expert in chemical weapons threatens to use his knowledge to punish the government for neglecting homeless, ill, disabled and unemployed veterans living as the unseen of the city. Maisie Dobbs, a former World War I nurse in France, and currently an investigator and psychologist, confronts difficult issues including a legacy of untreated mental health conditions experienced by World War I veterans, the inhuman treatment of women in mental health institutions, the emotional toll of war on a nation and its people as a whole and individually, and the effects of chemical war weapons, including during their research and development.As always, Maisie confronts her own demons resulting from her wartime experiences as Winspear examines the human need for home, love, companionship, friendship and the healing power found in our human interactions. Winspear takes the genre of historical mystery and raises it to do much more than entertain, but to examine who we are and why we do what we do. I highly recommend reading this novel if you enjoy well written, interesting mysteries, which take the readers deeply into examining the human condition and for anyone who enjoys the time period of World War I and/or the years between the World Wars. Finally, this book and the series as a whole, is very British….so if that is to your liking as it is to mine, then Maisie Dobbs and Among the Mad might be for you.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    Just before Christmas Maisie and her employee, Billie see a man commit suicide in the street. The man was clearly a War Veteran and events very quickly turn Maisie back to her nursing days during the Great War. Soon after an anonymous letter is received by the police threatening violence if the comments in the letter are not adhered to.Soon, Maisie is seconded to the Police as she and the police try and unravel the circumstances of the two issues. Is that deceased man part of the conspiracy to cause chaos in London? Next some animals in an animal shelter are found dead, the potential result of inhaling a poisonous gas, and then on the back of another letter some birds are found dead.Maisie springs into action as she and Billy try to discover the truth whilst confronting their own fears. Billy meanwhile, is still struggling with his wife Doreen who can not move past her grief following the death of their little girl and soon Doreen is admitted to hospital to receive treatment.In this book, which I think is the best, the author has tackled some real issues for the early 1930s. There has clearly been research done into early offerings by the War Office and poisonous gases and the 1930s treatment of those who were suffering from some kind of mental illness.
  • (4/5)
    A Maisie Dobbs murder mystery. pub. originally 2009, in paperback 2010. Mad ex-scientist works up to threatening mass murder. Excellent: one of the best in this series so far. A real page-turner.
  • (5/5)
    Superb book and wonderfully read by Orlagh Cassidy. Complex plot but very straightforward and I never had to think too hard to orientate myself. Definitely will read more by this author and reader.
  • (4/5)
    Among the Mad by Jacqueline Winspear is the sixth book in the Maisie Dobbs Series. In this book Maisie who is very familiar with injuries that are suffered as a result of wars as Maisie served as a nurse during the war and her character brings that experience and knowledge with her into these novels. Both the psychological and physical scars and the trauma or these events are identified throughout this book. As the book begins, Maisie observes the horror of a suicide on the sidewalk but then becomes pulled into a larger challenge when asked to work with Scotland Yard and the government on investigating deaths of animals and threats of terrorist acts. This book is a bit depressing as she is working with the issue of mental instability and illness. In addition the main story line, Maisie’s assistant Billy is also dealing with his wife’s mental breakdown following the lost of their baby girl and she wants to offer the family her support and assistance. Exploration into the issue of mental care facilities, asylums and the treatment of the mentally ill during the early 1930’s is a difficult one. The book is well written and the characters are well developed. From the brilliant scientists to the staunch police officers this book will bring you an even greater understanding of Maisie as the primary character in the series. Her relationship with her best friend Priscilla is also expanded upon and plays a role in humanizing Maisie and her own needs. I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to those who enjoy a light mystery or a bit of historical fiction but would also recommend that this series is best read beginning with the earlier books as the stories build upon each other over time.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not much of a mystery reader - I'll be the first to admit that, after reading mysteries for years, they become a bit predictable for me.The exception to that, however, is a well-researched historical mystery, and Jacqueline Winspear offers this decadent, perfect combination of mystery, fantastic heroine, and historical accuracy that is hard to resist.I've only read a few of the Maisie Dobbs stories (and oddly out of order, so don't let not having #1 stop you from reading them!) and they are really, really easy to get into and very hard to put down. I feel like I'm cheating on my homework every time I picked this book up - even though my homework was done! just because I was enjoying myself so thoroughly.I really enjoyed the plot of Among the Mad. I'm reviewing this for a book tour, and took a chance and let the tour host pick my title for me, and I am thoroughly pleased with how that Russian Roulette turned out.If you haven't experienced the Maisie Dobbs stories, I recommend you do so as soon as possible - even if you aren't a mystery lover. I think you'll find there's a little bit of everything for everyone in these books.
  • (4/5)
    The sixth installment in the Maisie Dobbs series. A madman has given London an ultimatum - address the needs of the poor and neglected, especially Veterans of the Great War by New Year's Eve -- or he will unleash chemical warfare on the unsuspecting populace. Ms. Winspear uses this as a jumping off place for various reflections on shell shock (PTSD) and other forms of mental illness. A shame that some 90 years after the events in this novel, mental illness should still carry the lingering disrepute in some quarters. Equally relevant to those concerned today with the treatment of modern era soldiers and their families.