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Ender's Game

Ender's Game


Ender's Game

оценки:
4.5/5 (450 оценки)
Длина:
11 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
1 апр. 2004 г.
ISBN:
9781593974756
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

The war with the Buggers has been raging for a hundred years, and the quest for the perfect general has been underway for almost as long. Enter Andrew "Ender" Wiggin, the result of decades of genetic experimentation.

Is Ender the general Earth so desperately needs? The only way to find out is to throw him into ever-harsher training at Battle School, to chip away and find the diamond inside, or destroy him utterly. Ender Wiggin is six years old when his training begins. He will grow up fast.

But Ender is not the only result of the experiment. His two older siblings, Peter and Valentine, are every bit as unusual as he is, but in very different ways. Among the three of them lie the abilities to remake a world. If, that is, the world survives.

This Special 20th Anniversary Edition of the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning classic is now digitally remastered with a full cast production. It also contains an exclusive bonus: an original postscript written and recorded by the author himself, Orson Scott Card!

A Macmillan Audio production.

Издатель:
Издано:
1 апр. 2004 г.
ISBN:
9781593974756
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

Orson Scott Card is best known for his science fiction novel Ender's Game and its many sequels that expand the Ender Universe into the far future and the near past. Those books are organized into the Ender Saga, which chronicles the life of Ender Wiggin; the Shadow Series, which follows on the novel Ender's Shadow and is set on Earth; and the Formic Wars series, written with co-author Aaron Johnston, which tells of the terrible first contact between humans and the alien "Buggers." Card has been a working writer since the 1970s. Beginning with dozens of plays and musical comedies produced in the 1960s and 70s, Card's first published fiction appeared in 1977--the short story "Gert Fram" in the July issue of The Ensign, and the novelette version of "Ender's Game" in the August issue of Analog. The novel-length version of Ender's Game, published in 1984 and continuously in print since then, became the basis of the 2013 film, starring Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis, and Abigail Breslin. Card was born in Washington state, and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, he runs occasional writers' workshops and directs plays. He frequently teaches writing and literature courses at Southern Virginia University. He is the author many science fiction and fantasy novels, including the American frontier fantasy series "The Tales of Alvin Maker" (beginning with Seventh Son), and stand-alone novels like Pastwatch and Hart's Hope. He has collaborated with his daughter Emily Card on a manga series, Laddertop. He has also written contemporary thrillers like Empire and historical novels like the monumental Saints and the religious novels Sarah and Rachel and Leah. Card's work also includes the Mithermages books (Lost Gate, Gate Thief), contemporary magical fantasy for readers both young and old. Card lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Kristine Allen Card. He and Kristine are the parents of five children and several grandchildren.


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4.5
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  • (5/5)
    A book that has changed my life, which seems cliche but is so very true.
  • (5/5)
    The book is great. But honestly, the very last few minutes of the audio book was my favorite part. “The game is Real.”?
  • (5/5)
    This book opened up the world of sci-fi for me. I’ve read it at 20x if not more. Orson Scott Card has a gift of insight into motivations that make up our humanity. This book is more than science fiction, he’s done such a great job at capturing the heart of human behavior.
  • (5/5)
    Wow this book was amazing! I think it's a great book for young leaders to read to learn that there isn't one way that's right.
  • (5/5)
    Very good story. I listened to the audiobook and the only negative thing I could say about the audio version is that there are to many different narrators. Otherwise this is a great story, great layout, has good surprises, everything is a recommend. In my top 5 of my all time favorites.
  • (4/5)
    This book does so many things, its hard to say its just a sci fi boys adventure. Its also a look into the mind of the turmoil of warfare, and its effect on our minds. Only complaint is that Ender is just BETTER than everyone else... kinda makes its seem like personal drive is secondary to natural ability. Still a great book. Looking forward to the rest of the series.
  • (4/5)
    When Ender Wiggin is 6 years old, he's taken from his home and his beloved sister Valentine to begin training in Battle School. Ender is the best hope the Earth has of eradicating the mysterious buggers who nearly wiped out the human race. His instructors push him beyond his limits in hopes of speeding along the process. He finds himself isolated again and again and treated increasingly unfairly. How far can Ender be pushed?I loved this book. The plot is amazing and keeps readers absorbed from the beginning. Card does a great job of complicating his characters as the story progresses. Every time you think you know a character, they do something unexpected. The dialogue is fantastic. It opens up a great conversation about how technology affects our society. It's a really long book and probably best suited for 7th grade up.
  • (4/5)
    I really don't know whether to give this book 4 or 5 stars. The ending is what makes me want to bump it up to 5 stars; I didn't really see it coming. But the general feeling the book gave me while reading makes me want to bring it down to 4. I guess that's what you get with dystopian fiction though; they're not exactly supposed to be feel-good stories! But I rate books on how I feel about them personally, not on how well-executed a book it might be. So I give it 4.5 stars (when will Goodreads implement half stars?!!).

    I loved the concept of leaving home and going off to a school for gifted children in space; although, I didn't feel like I could really identify with many of the students. They were mostly cold-hearted, and there were hardly any female students. Plus, I'm so not into military strategies and tactics, but there was enough heart in the book to keep me interested. A good portion of the book reminded me of futuristic quidditch turned laser tag. Battle School really is kind of similar to Hogwarts in that way - different armies (houses) named after animals who play against each other while all away at the same school.

    Ender is a great character; I love that he never got conceited or lost his love for his sister and compassion for others after all he had been through.

    I can't decide if I want to read the rest of the series. The book was definitely good enough as is.

    I loved the introduction by the author in this edition; the highlights: discussion on our ageist society and also about how he wrote this book to be accessible to everyone; you don't need a degree in literary analysis to get something from the book.
  • (3/5)
    I can see why making the movie version of this book has taken so much time..there is no way it gets made pre- Hunger Games' success.
  • (5/5)
    I think everyone should be required to read Ender's Game. This book was exciting, action packed, heartbreaking, funny, and everything that one could possibly ask for in a story.
    I tried to compose a review that would capture the essence of this story, but I was unable to do it.
    I will say this. Ender Wiggin is cunning. He’s a killer, but only in self defense. He can command an entire fleet of starships and any army would follow him to the ends of the earth because they hold him in a higher honor and esteem than anyone else. He’s a genius. He’s calm and collect and always completely in control of himself and others, even if those individuals don’t realize it. Ender is six years old when he’s selected to attend battle school for all the previously mentioned reasons. By the time he’s eleven years old, he must fight and destroy an entire race of alien beings. Ender bears the weight of the world and the fate of humanity on his shoulders. Ender Wiggin is my hero.
  • (5/5)
    This book was utterly captivating and kept me reading eagerly until I was done. I thought it had a nice blend of character development, hard science fiction, and military realism. It was so easy for me to imagine the characters, the settings, the action that I nearly forgot how much I completely disagree with the writer's personal politics, religious beliefs, and general outlook on the human condition. I do look forward to reading more of his books, at least in the Ender series. I also look forward to seeing the upcoming film based on this book.
  • (5/5)
    The first time I read this book I was maybe 14 and loved it. After reading it again at 25 I still love it. I have finally broken down and bought the first 4 books of the series, and instead of reviewing them as has been done hundreds of times before me, by people who are exceptionally more talented than I, I will just say that this books still remains as one of my all time favorites.

    Also it should be labeled as a gateway drug, for after reading this it will surely force you to read anything that Orson Scott Card has ever published. And you would be right to do so.
  • (5/5)
    I was warned Ender's Game would mess with my mind. Obviously, I didn't take these warnings to heart, since I got within the last thirty pages and started flailing with realisation. The end is a nice twist. If you go through the story complacently, if you identify with Ender and see things the way he does, it comes out of completely nowhere. But it also makes sense and works and is good, and I don't think I've read a better ending for a book in quite a while.

    Ender, as a character, is pretty likeable despite his darker side. I loved the fact that his brother and sister had such an effect on him, and I loved that he and Valentine ended up in the same place again in the end. The last chapter feels quite rushed, but it does show us Ender growing up and changing, and presumably bridges to other books in the series. I don't know whether I want to read more right now, but I'll definitely pick the other books up if I see them on the shelves.

    Other characters, such as Bean and Petra and Alai, were quite in the background, but I kind of wanted to know more about them, too.

    One of my friends credits this book with changing his life. I wouldn't say it's been a life-changer for me, but it's very good sci-fi and very interesting and you could also have moral debates about a lot of it. Good book for discussion, I think.
  • (1/5)
    It's always strange to me when I'm so out of step with the majority opinion on a book that's so popular. I just didn't think it was a very good book, in any way. I didn't hate it, it was more like one of those non-events that I don't understand how anyone could have strong feelings about.

    I read this years ago, so I can't remember all the details, and there's no way in hell I'm going to go back to it. I thought it was really simplistic, boring, didn't make a lot of sense at times, the characters were flat and one dimensional, and didn't seem to have much of a point. When I finished it I thought "was that it?".

    It's too bad that there are so many people here saying "I guess I just don't like sci-fi". Making that opinion based on this book is like hearing Kenny G and saying "I guess I don't like jazz".

    I wouldn't normally give 1 star since I didn't totally hate it, but there wasn't really a single thing I liked about it either. I can't think of any reason to give it more.
  • (3/5)
    recently re-read this book after a good 20 years. (long time ago on analog magazine) my son wanted to discuss it so i made myself go through the book one more time. i can say this, it didn't get better with age. my trouble with the book comes mostly from the poor science and contrived interactions. card is a good writer, just not my kind of good writer. i would recommend a story published around the same time, 'songbird', as a better platform for card's skills.

    don't condemn me for how i feel.
  • (5/5)
    narrated by Stefan Rudnicki and Harlan Ellison.
    Audio Renaissance put this unabridged narration out for the 20th anniversary of the book. It's very well done, and the afterword by Card is fascinating. The book itself is so gripping and well-written that it doesn't matter that one knows the punchline after the first reading.
  • (4/5)
    I’ve been wanting to actually read the later books in the Ender and Bean series, but I thought I should probably re-read the first books as well, so they were fresh in my brain. This is so well done. [July 2011]
  • (4/5)
    While many parts of this book may be viewed as if for younger generation, I felt that Ender tapped into my emotions in a way that children would not comprehend. While the specific topics discussed were out of my interest zones, the plot kept me enticed. This book is quite the page turned though details of battles were often above my head.

    On the contrary, I was not a huge fan of the last chapter. It confused me as it deviated from the normal logical sequence of the book. I felt that it was rushed and a bit forced. I would have been fine if the bookended a chapter sooner, leaving many questions but also a sense of completion and full circle.
  • (4/5)
    The second time around I found Ender's Game to be equally as good as the first time, but less enchanting. I saw the foreshadowing, philosophy, and imperfections more and found myself immersed a little less. I am glad to have picked it up again with an eye to see the scaffolding behind the story.
  • (1/5)
    As far as classic sci-fi goes, this did not live up to the hype. I enjoyed it, but it ranks further down my list than most.
  • (4/5)
    I like everything about this book, except perhaps the ending. And I can't even say that I particularly disliked the ending; it just made my soul ache with remorse and regret - for Ender, for humanity, for the buggers.

    Ender is six years old when we meet him. He is the third son of the Wiggins and a child genius. Not surprising, consider both of his older siblings are both child prodigies, but with vastly different temperaments. The Wiggins were allowed to have a third child as part of an experiment; an effort to create the best of both of the other siblings and something to could be molded into a perfect military savior.

    The world is desperate. Humanity was nearly exterminated by the First Invasion of the buggers. The only reason the Second Invasion failed was do to the quick thinking of one man who realized the essence of bugger strategy and communication. Once he realized the fundamental differences between humans and buggers, his single squadron was able to take down the entire Second Invasion.

    But little Ender does not know of the dire peril to the world. His concerns involve school yard bullies, psychotic older brothers and the stigma of being a "Third" child in a two child only society.

    The military places Ender in Battle School, where he is trained, isolated and pushed to and beyond breaking. He lives up to his potential and is transferred to Command School two or four years early (I can't remember which - sorry my memory is faulty today). In Command School, he learns the art of fleet command and is goaded by a nemesis-like teacher - an old man who just happens to be the one who stopped with Second Invasion seventy years earlier.

    Ender and his commanders (from Battle School) fight battle after battle against the buggers in a simulator, ultimately culminating in his "final examination" when his fleet reaches the bugger home world. Facing odds wherein his fleet is outnumber a thousand to one, Ender makes the decision to destroy the bugger home world with a nuclear device that causes a chain reaction from the planet to the enemy fleet. Unknown to Ender and his squad commanders at the Command School, the simulator was actually a real time connection to the human fleet enroute and in orbit around the bugger home planet. The buggers are completely annihilated - xenocide.

    So, Ender made the choice that saved humanity. But at a huge cost to himself.

    Back on Earth, his siblings have been busy (for years) stirring up trouble and gaining political clout via pseudonyms in cyberspace. Peter, Ender's older brother, is poised to become a world leader. Valentine, Ender's sister, wants to escape her brother and also save Ender, so she manages to convince Peter to let Ender be the governor of the first human colony sent out from Earth to occupy one of the former bugger worlds. He agrees, after some convincing by Valentine.

    Ender eventually discovers that the nightmares he used to experience back at Battle School and Command School were actually attempts by the buggers to communicate with him, or at least learn enough about Ender to leave him a message. He reads the message and discovers a package left behind for him - the larvae of a bugger queen. The message included the apology from the buggers for they were aghast at what they had done, once they discovered that humans were not a hive, but each individual was a unique being, completely separate from the host consciousness. The buggers communicate mind-to-mind instantaneously across even the vastness of space. They had no vocal cords and no communication equipment aboard their ships. No way to contact or communicate with the humans to discover that they were much more alike than they were different.

    Ender writes the buggers' history and publishes under the name "Speaker of the Dead" and makes it his life mission to find a world where he can deposit the larvae and resurrect the species he was instrumental in destroying.

    As I mentioned at the beginning of this review, I loved all of this story. It was fast paced and easy to identify with Ender. Or at least easy for me as a former gifted child myself. For the most part, speaking for myself, I don't remember being or thinking like a child. For as long as I can remember I have thought as I do now. So it wasn't unbelievable to me that Ender would think and act the way he did and respond to the situations he was placed in as he did.

    The ending just left me feeling extremely sad for all the characters in this story. I shouldn't be shocked, though, as all conflict could be avoided with open and honest communication. The level of sacrifice evidence in Ender's story illustrates the pointlessness of our endeavors when communication is not possible.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite YA novels.
  • (5/5)
    Ender Wiggins is a child, bred and painstakingly trained to be a military genius in a future Earth where humankind is threatened by an alien species with whom we can't communicate.

    Winner of the Nebula and Hugo awards. A very creative and thought-provoking book. (My son recently re-read the book and it's one I've always meant to read so finally got around to it).

    NC tidbit- part of the story takes place in Greensboro, NC - Orson Scott Cards home for close to 30 years now.
  • (5/5)
    Don't normally list books I'm rereading, but it's been several years since I picked up Ender's Game. It's fun to read Card's early style with a fresh eye, especially because I really admire him as a stylist.

    Having reread it, I can still say that I love this book.... The style is at times not as polished as Card's later work (point-of-view changes within the same scene which are useful but off-putting), but in parts it just shines. I love how the plot starts small and becomes epic by the end; it's as if the world becomes bigger as Ender grows up.

    The last line is probably one of my favorite lines of any book - up there with One Hundred Years of Solitude. It's absolutely the right line to end on, and you can tell Card knows it and feels a bit smug about it. :)
  • (3/5)
    Child geniuses are developed and trained by the government to save the world. Andrew "Ender" Wiggin is one of them.

    There are some objectionable things to get out of the way first of all:
    #1: The author has what IMO are horrid and un-defendable views on...well, almost everything.
    #2: The author (Because of? Despite?) somehow then manages to keep kids naked for half the book and there were a few scenes which stood out to me as a little creepy (there is no sexuality of any sort that I recall, however.)
    #3: Almost everything about this author as a man makes my skin crawl, encompassing nearly everything he's ever said about anything, but at the end of the day, I'm reading fiction, not having lunch with the guy.

    This book was very enjoyable, though like many of the genre it is heavy on concept, mood, and philosophy while being light in nuance, prose, and artistry. I'm not trashing it, just pointing out that most sci-fi books are judged almost entirely on the level of the concept, not the execution. And, in fact, books heavy on such execution are often not what many habitual readers of the genre are interested in.

    That out of the way, I have to say that the concept is only of some interest, the development of the concept is what makes this book pleasurable. The author does an outstanding job of setting the mental/emotional stage of the main character and dragging him through the created world. Some characters, including the deuteragonist suffer a bit in comparison, falling into overly supportive roles without enough of their own motivations other than where expressly deigned to be antagonistic.

    At the end of the day, am I looking for great art or cheap fun? Sometimes, as I found in this book, something in between is just fine, even if the author gives me the heebie-jeebies.
  • (5/5)
    Man, this might set me off on string of military sci-fi books. I don't know why I've never really read any before now, but if they're anything like Ender's Game then I've got a whole new genre to feed from.

    Setting out I knew this was classic, which usually ruins the book as my expectations end up being too high. I was quite surprised at how the simple-seeming story slowly unfolded into something far more complex and engaging. There's a great cast of characters here that I ended up caring about... even Peter.

    I listened to the 20th Anniversary Audio version off of Audible, I gotta mention that its top notch. There's 5-6 different readers playing out the different characters and they're all well acted. Highly recommended.
  • (2/5)
    I understand why some of my male students really like this book. It has some real moments of thoughtful, interesting commentary on politics, war, peace, and growing up. But it spends far too much time describing, in great detail, battles and strategies that the characters are undertaking. There was a lot of narration in this book; narration of what people were thinking about, narration of fighting. But what I found lacking was actual interaction between people that wasn't distanced by having the narratator between the reader and characters. Everything was made more bland and gray by the filter of narrative explanation--we weren't ever allowed just to observe characters or actions.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic Book! IMO it's best as Foundation Trilogy but fast pace, more action,stronger character. Although it has some violence scene for younger readers.Card portray all the strategy in every scene that Ender choose them is clearly and too easy to understand it.I love Ender, Bean, Valentine, Peter, Petra, Alai, Graff and Mazor Rackham, all of them have the strong character to hold the story very very excellent. Highly Recommended for everyone to love scifi or not.
  • (3/5)
    3.5 to 4 stars. This review took a while, because I needed some time to get my thoughts together. This one was definitely a tough one for me to rate. I didn't like it as much as I thought I would, but at the same time I'm pretty sure I liked it more than I should. Not really sure if I'm making any sense at all.Perhaps it had to do with not knowing anything about this book before I picked it up, other than that it's widely popular and highly acclaimed...which was probably why I felt a little like the odd one out when I started reading and found that a lot about the book annoyed me. At times the writing and story felt really awkward and forced, like the author was trying too hard, with pretty much every point, symbol and device etc. spelled out for the reader as if they would not be savvy enough to pick it up for themselves. He is quite heavy-handed when it comes to the conveying of the book's ideas.It was then I started looking around and saw that this book is considered by many to be more appropriate for young adults. In some ways, that makes a lot more sense. In the end, I had to look at this book a whole different way in order to rate it fairly.Still, some parts of the book were better than others. The last 10%, for example, was so completely different to me than the rest of the novel that it almost felt like somebody else wrote it. It's almost as if Orson Scott Card had this amazing idea for this profound conclusion but had no clue how to tie it to the beginning, and so simply filled up the middle with a bunch of fights in battle rooms. Such shallow action is a stark contrast to the deeply thoughtful ending, which nonetheless I have to admit made up for my lukewarm reaction to everything else.
  • (4/5)
    Very good military recruit/training story. But much more than that at the end! As one of the readers Card describes in his introduction, I have placed myself inside his story, not as spectator, but as participant. The hero, Ender, has many qualities in common with anyone who grew up dealing with the consequences of being “above average” among his peers, a category I would guess most sci-fi fans are familiar with.