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The Palace Job

The Palace Job

Написано Patrick Weekes

Озвучено Justine Eyre


The Palace Job

Написано Patrick Weekes

Озвучено Justine Eyre

оценки:
4.5/5 (21 оценки)
Длина:
11 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Oct 8, 2013
ISBN:
9781480567122
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Loch is seeking revenge.
It would help if she wasn't in jail.

The plan: to steal a priceless elven manuscript that once belonged to her family, but now is in the hands of the most powerful man in the Republic. To do so Loch-former soldier, former prisoner, current fugitive-must assemble a crack team of magical misfits that includes a cynical illusionist, a shapeshifting unicorn, a repentant death priestess, a talking magical warhammer, and a lad with seemingly no skills to help her break into the floating fortress of Heaven's Spire and the vault that holds her family's treasure-all while eluding the unrelenting pursuit of Justicar Pyvic, whose only mission is to see the law upheld.

What could possibly go wrong?

The Palace Job is a funny, action-packed, high-fantasy heist caper in the tradition of Scott Lynch's Gentleman Bastards series, from debut author Patrick Weekes.

Издатель:
Издано:
Oct 8, 2013
ISBN:
9781480567122
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Patrick Weekes was born in the San Francisco Bay Area and attended Stanford University, where he received a BA and an MA in English literature. By day he works at BioWare, where he has worked on games in the Dragon Age and Mass Effect series. By night, he is the author of the Rogues of the Republic trilogy; Dragon Age: The Masked Empire, a novel set in the Dragon Age universe; and Feeder. Patrick lives in Edmonton in Alberta, Canada, with his wife Karin, his two Lego-and-video-game-obsessed sons, and far too many rescued animals. In his spare time, he takes on unrealistic Lego-building projects, practices Kenpo Karate, and embarrasses himself in video games. Follow him on Twitter at @PatrickWeekes.

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Что люди думают о The Palace Job

4.5
21 оценки / 4 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    A fast paced, but well written fantasy romp with enough humour and danger to while away a few hours. Memorable characters and well described settings (without being overly wordy) make for an entertaining and original take on the fantasy genre. Can’t wait to read/listen to the next one.
  • (5/5)
    I had to listen to this at 0.8 speed as the accent of the narrator, and the mutlisyllabic words combined for many hits of the 30 second rewind button. Loved it, though. Am on my second listen. Listened to all 3 books. Smart. Funny. Great characters. Satire and plot twists and jokes and such great world building.
  • (4/5)
    A great book -- though, a couple heads-ups beforehand:1) If you are planning to read this on the Kindle, be forewarned that there are quite a few formatting errors and typos, which the author explained to me over Twitter were introduced by the publisher's scanning software. Ultimately these errors weren't too bad, just mildly distracting, and I certainly can't fault Weekes for those.2) However, I also found the writing to be a bit rough, though this might be attributed to the author's own unique style. The best way I can think of to describe it is it almost feels like Weekes wrote this book like he was describing a movie, one that only he can see in his head. There were parts where I found descriptions to be sorely lacking. Scenes with lots of conversation bouncing between multiple characters were especially tough on me, since these work well on a big screen when the audience can follow the speakers visually, but it doesn't fly so well on the written page. And in a book like this, there certainly were a crapload of characters to keep track of.Those were the two main obstacles I had to overcome, but apart from them I have to say this was very enjoyable. I was sucked in completely somewhere between the first couple of chapters -- after prisoners Loch and Kail escape their sentences and start planning their heist by recruiting other thieves and other talented individuals to their cause. No shocker that this book has been described as Ocean's Eleven meets fantasy, as that's pretty much the whole story, with a magical twist.The first quarter of the novel was probably my favorite part, as it comprised all the character introductions. We have two ex-soldiers-turned-thieves, a tinkerer/lock picker extraordinaire, one talented acrobat, a shape-shifting unicorn, a death priestess and her magical talking hammer, a wizard, and his young friend with a big secret. Like I said before, lots of characters to keep track of. With such a huge cast, I wasn't expecting much terms of character development which under these circumstances would be understandable, but I was nonetheless impressed given the restraints the author had to work with. Each character was unique, given an interesting background and an important role to play. Surprisingly though? My favorite character was the justicar Pyvic, the "inspector" in this story, and not one of the thieves.One other thing about the characters: I find "group" heist stories are often sausage fests (I mean, look at Ocean's Eleven, Reservoir Dogs, etc.) so I have to say I feel like giving Patrick Weekes a big kudos for writing a book featuring an ensemble which includes quite a few females -- females who aren't there solely there for token purposes or to be romantic interests, I might add! In fact, not counting the talking warhammer, half the team are women. Anyway, this observation did strike me as I was reading, so I just thought I'd add the thought as an aside.As I was saying, I realize a big cast necessitates taking away from character development somewhat, but I also want to note that it might have taken away from the world-building as well. Though don't get me wrong, what we are given about the setting and its background is adequate and more than enough to follow the book, but I wouldn't have minded a little more description. I gathered that we have a world here which is populated by humans, dwarves and elves. The humans are comprised of different races, defined by geography and history. There's an established political system in place. Multiple tongues are spoken by the people, but at some point one of the characters also spoke French, which was referred as an ancient language. I'm pretty much intrigued with all of it. Weekes obviously put a lot of thought into this world, and it's just a shame he didn't get a chance to fully flesh it out, but then again, I totally get that there's a story to be told and that takes priority.And that is what drives everything in the end, after all. The story. Full of political intrigue, twists and turns, double crosses and hidden agendas, it's actually quite amazing to me how the author managed to cram all that goodness into this average-length book. It definitely makes up for everything else.Bottom line: this book is clever, humorous and a lot of fun. If you're looking for a light read with a good action-filled and fast-paced story, you won't be disappointed.
  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The Palace Job, by Patrick Weekes, is a quick, easy read that doesn't require anything of the reader other than being awake. It's pure fantasy pulp, a sort of Ocean's Eleven meets horny unicorn, sentient war hammer, and butch-bitch disinherited baroness. There isn't much here to grab your attention, no remarkable writing, no ingenious plotting. Weekes' attempt to write book from a black perspective is a bit laughable, with a very white-centric focus. There is a social structure and several institutions which are never fully explained or fleshed out so that this reader was unable identify with the fantasy world Weekes' attempts to build. Mostly it's just a lot of fight scenes and reads a bit like a script for an online game, complete with sexual innuendo and adolescent fulfilment. Based upon this example, I won't be looking for any further works from Weekes, and likely not from Tyche Books either.

    1 person found this helpful