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All That Glitters

All That Glitters

Написано Linda Howard

Озвучено Emily Rose


All That Glitters

Написано Linda Howard

Озвучено Emily Rose

оценки:
2.5/5 (8 оценки)
Длина:
7 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Aug 1, 2013
ISBN:
9781624067709
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Greek billionaire playboy Nikolas Constantinos intended to conclude the business deal with Jessica Stanton, a.k.a. The Black Widow, as quickly as possible. Love hadn't been part of his plan. A hot affair or a one-night stand was all he'd allow. Because love would lead to marriage. And marriage to Jessica, a woman with a scandalous past, could ruin him. But love was the one thing he couldn't control.
Издатель:
Издано:
Aug 1, 2013
ISBN:
9781624067709
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

Linda Howard is the award-winning author of many New York Times bestsellers, including Up Close and Dangerous, Drop Dead Gorgeous, Cover of Night, Killing Time, To Die For, Kiss Me While I Sleep, Cry No More, and Dying to Please. She lives in Alabama with her husband and two golden retrievers.


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2.6
8 оценки / 7 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (3/5)
    Wealthy widow Jessica Stanton has some shares that Nikolas Constantinos wants. And after he meets her, he wants her too. And he's willing to do whatever's necessary to have her, including marry her.Definitely dated - this one hails from an era when manly men bullied the subject of their affections, and apparently everyone was quite okay with that.
  • (3/5)
    Early Linda Howard. Bullying coercive Hero, [punishing kisses, 'I can make you want me!'] limp watering pot heroine, she cries, sobs, and weeps at every juncture. Howard's "Tears of the Renegade" has the same plotline with a stronger heroine and keener tension. Sara Craven's "Strange Adventure" has similar plotline with more angst. [Strangely both Glitters and Adventure have Greek heroes, heroine injured and trapped on the seashore in the fifth act.]
  • (1/5)
    TRIGGERING. I Love Linda Howard but hate this book. Non-consensual scenes with the "hero" bullying the heroine to the point where she is begging him to stop... and add a weak unimaginative plot which makes me want to print the book out and burn it. Would give zero stars if I could.
  • (2/5)
    I heard the copyright date and realized why I didn’t like it. The book was a bodice ripper. The heroine is treated badly and gets mad but is totally ineffectual in living her own life. She is a victim and her whole energy is focused on making the really cruel hero/villain love her. I used to enjoy the genre in the 1980’s. I like modern books better.
  • (4/5)
    It certainly would not be for everyone- with its insanely angry and jealous hero and weepy heroine. But it had a very good level of angst, hence I persevered.
    The book has our hero, Greek billionaire playboy Nikolas Constantinos intended to try to conclude a business deal with Jessica Stanton, a.k.a. The Black Widow by making her give up shares in her late husband's company. From their first meeting, sparks fly and they soon enter a game of chase in which the heroine becomes the hero's prey. He is obsessed with bedding her, and the book has multiple scenes of him pushing her beyond her comfort zone- be it by forcing his kisses, wills, or decisions on her. The heroine fights him until she can, and soon her vulnerable heart gives into his manipulations. She surrenders to his wishes, only to be repeatedly accused of being a gold digger, and getting trapped in a relationship that might someday leave her lonelier and broken. The heartbreak in this book is immense- you get teary-eyed from the first chapter, with the heroine's vulnerability, and the heroic exploits it thoroughly throughout the book. I felt really sad for her and don't even blame her for giving in as the hero repeatedly refused to accept her denials. The WHOLE book is a cat-and-mouse game between a reluctant heroine and an overbearing hero.
    That being said, the hero was an absolute cad. We have alpha, possessive heroes, and then we have asshole tomcats, who don't respect consent, plan on sleeping with OW while simultaneously trying to seduce the heroine, vow to marry another respectable woman because whatever the heroine does- his opinions do not change and who has no control on his anger. Furthermore, his threats to abandon the heroine did not add anything to his growing list of vileness. I think he was mean to the heroine for no reason and projected his insecurities at her. He even changed her wedding dress's color! A control freak who thought of the heroine as his possessive toy. Definitely one of the worst heroes I've ever read.
    The heroine was an orphan, married to a caring man first and a brute the second time. She desperately seeks love and validation, hence took all the crab the hero repeatedly put her through, while simultaneously crying up a river and playing yes-no-yes at every turn. I don't think she ever got time to mature, and her ability to wallow in self-pity was commendable.
    If it weren’t for Linda's wonderful writing and the buckets of tears, this book made me cry- this would be rated lower thanks to the douche of a hero. But I'm an angst hoe, and this had tones of it, and I LOVED IT!

  • (1/5)
    This book is pretty typical 80s romance. The hero is domineering, to a degree that is quite sickening. A wealthy Greek billionaire, Niko first crosses paths with the heroine Jessica when she uses her power as a shareholder of his company to vote against a merger Niko had wanted to pass. Displeased at being thwarted, Niko basically harasses Jessica until she agrees to sell her shares to him. Sometime during this harassment, the two realize they are attracted to each other. Jessica is terrified of making the relationship physical because despite her reputation as the Black Widow, she is actually a virgin. Niko thinks she’s playing hard to get so she can trap him into marrying her.Read from the lens of a 2014 reader, the plot is absolutely disgusting. Jessica’s fear seemed way too exaggerated. I have never met someone so terrified of losing their virginity. Even as a female myself, the fear just seemed unrealistic to me. This was made worse by the fact that Jessica never communicated this fear to Niko. She pretty much allowed him to continue thinking she slept with men for money until he discovered for himself (in quite a painful way) that he was wrong about her. What made this plot point most irritating is the fact that all of this could have been avoided with one simple conversation. If Niko had just kept quiet for five minutes and let Jessica speak or if Jessica could have had more courage to stand up to him and demand that he listen to her, the whole wedding night fiasco could have been avoided.The wedding night fiasco sets up the latter half of the plot, where despite no longer being a virgin, Jessica is still completely terrified of sex because of how awful her first time was. Once again, the fear felt exaggerated. After having sex for the second time, without any pain and Jessica actually seemed to enjoy it, Jessica suffers a nervous breakdown to the point where a doctor had to give her a sedative to calm down. Her emotions really were theatrical and got old really quickly. Even after it had been established they could have enjoyable sex, Jessica still freaked out at Niko when he touched her because it supposedly reminded her of their first time. To be fair, a lot of their encounters did border on sexual assault/rape. Jessica would ask Niko to stop, Niko would keep going anyway because the word no just doesn't exist in his world. Jessica always struck me as wishy-washy in these encounters. She wasn't entirely opposed to the physical intimacy, she was more just scared. This indecision on her part was not at all endearing and in fact annoyed the heck out of me.Not to be outdone, the hero was also a grade A ***hat. Whenever Jessica tried to explain things to him, Niko cuts her off either claiming he didn't want/need to hear what she had to say (because he had already made up his mind as to what the truth was) or because he wanted her to bend to his will instead. People close to Niko kept telling Jessica he was a man who did not compromise yet was making exceptions for her. I saw no such exceptions. In the end, he got exactly what he wanted: Jessica sold him her shares, she signed a ridiculous pre-nup that completely 100% benefited him, she slept with him, and he married a virgin. Niko was such a clout that he didn't even tell Jessica he loved her until she asked him about it first. Then he tried to play the whole "how can you be so blind? I've shown you my love in so many ways and do you need to be told the sky is blue to know that it is in fact blue?" card. His love was not anywhere near obvious and as the reader, I wouldn't have known he loved her unless he said it. Overall, this book is garbage. It's well written, but very dated in terms of style. The romance genre has been greatly revamped since this book was published. Skip it unless you don't mind overbearing men, milk toast heroines, and cliched miscommunication.
  • (2/5)
    When Jessica Stanton refuses to vote on her stock options the way Greek billionaire and bully Nikolas Constantinos wishes, he decides to retaliate, until he meets her. The press bestowed the sobriquet “Black Widow” on Jessica because she married a man old enough to be her grandfather, a man who subsequently died and made her very rich. But Jessica doesn’t want wealth; she wants love, which she believes she’s found in Nikolas. Although why she thinks this, will be a mystery to readers since he all but rapes her time and again. As he hounds her and she repels him, readers will see a textbook case of verbal and physical abuse in a tale that epitomizes the worst of late twentieth-century romance. Alas, even Howard’s facile writing can’t save this story about a cruel man, a purportedly strong but weepy doormat heroine, and a ludicrous plot set in glamorous London and on a Greek island. Although this may be Howard’s worst book, libraries may want it to round out their popular Howard collection as she retains her best-seller status as queen of romantic suspense with such worthy titles as Shadow Woman (2013). — Pat Henshaw