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Down Don't Bother Me: A Novel

Down Don't Bother Me: A Novel

Написано Jason Miller

Озвучено Johnny Heller


Down Don't Bother Me: A Novel

Написано Jason Miller

Озвучено Johnny Heller

оценки:
3.5/5 (13 оценки)
Длина:
6 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
24 мар. 2015 г.
ISBN:
9780062373861
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

A hugely entertaining debut-the first novel in a wickedly funny gothic mystery series set in the withering landscape of the southern Illinois coal country known as "little Egypt"-that blends the wry humor of Kevin Wilson, the dark violence of Urban Waite, and the electric atmosphere of Greg Iles.

In the depths of the Knight Hawk, one of the last working collieries in downstate Illinois, the body of a reporter is found, his mini-recorder tied around his neck and a notepad stuffed in his mouth.

The Knight Hawk's owner, Matthew Luster, isn't happy. He wants answers-and he doesn't want the cops or any more press poking into his business. To protect himself and the operation, he turns to Slim, a mine employee with a reputation for "bloodhounding"-finding lost souls when the police can't or won't. Luster needs Slim to locate a missing photographer named Beckett, a close associate of the victim . . . who just happens to be his son-in-law.

A hard-working single father barely making ends meet, Slim accepts the job-after Luster offers him a guaranteed pension and job security for life. But when you make a deal with the devil, you're going to get burned . . . . and now Slim is all too close to the flames. Circumstances have lead him into the grimy underworld of Little Egypt, Illinois-a Babel's Tower of rednecks, rubes, freaks, tweakers, gun nuts, and aging hippies-and it quickly becomes clear that he's much more involved in the murder than an innocent man should be.

Down Don't Bother Me marks the emergence of a wildly assured mystery novelist, and of a series set in the fresh and brutal landscape of southern Illinois.

Издатель:
Издано:
24 мар. 2015 г.
ISBN:
9780062373861
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

Jason Miller is half of the Miller Brothers writing team, creators of the critically acclaimed graphic novel Redball 6. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.


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3.4
13 оценки / 4 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    Being in on the launch of a new detective/mystery series is always a pleasure, like discovering a new restaurant. Here's a hilariously earthy character in an earthy setting. Slim Hawkshaw is the REAL canary in the coal mine - a miner ("a little like one of those characters in Hades, but without the fun or glamour") who is offered a pension guarantee to investigate the disappearance of a mine owner's son-in-law. Slim, a single dad, has a wise-ass daughter Anci, a Hawk-like (from Spenser/Robert P Parker) accomplice/protector, Jeep, and a girlfriend Patty, who's not quite ready to commit, and has "a figure that would make Jesus punch a mule." Lots of memorable descriptions and a highly plausible plot make this one of my top mysteries of 2015.Jason Miller does an excellent job balancing humor and suspense.
  • (5/5)
    Now in addition to having an eBook and a physical book always on the go, I also have an audio book queued up as well - sometimes to help me fall asleep.Well, there was no way I was falling asleep listening to Jason Miller's debut novel Down Don't Bother Me. In fact - I stayed up much later than I had planned!Miller's protagonist is Slim, an Illinois coal miner with a propensity for finding people. It's not a job for Slim, but he's helped out folks before. But this time, he doesn't have much of a choice. A reporter is found dead in the mine - and the photographer working with him is missing. Luster, the mine owner, wants to run his own search for the photographer - who just happens to be his son-in-law. Well, Slim is a single father, so when Luster dangles a pension as a carrot, Slim takes the job.Now, I'm sure the written book will Miller many fans. But - the audio version was fantastic! The reader was Johnny Heller - one of my favourites. He has a low, gravely, worn voice that completely embodied the mental image I had of Slim. Heller's interpretation of Miller's story was perfect rhythm, cadence and tone.The setting is just as great. Slim makes his home in Little Eygpt - one of the last colliery towns in Illinois. Its down and dirty, populated by a wild variety of characters - methheads, environmental activists, gangs and everyday folks just trying to make a go of it.I'm going to applaud the supporting cast as well. Slim's daughter Anci is a firecracker - smart and wise to the ugliness of the world even at twelve. I enjoyed the relationship between Slim and his girlfriend Peggy - the give and take, the yes or no. Every protagonist needs a sidekick and Slim has a good one with Jeep - a big, strong guy who is like a brother to Slim. But, the standout of course, is Slim - he's rough around the edges, but smart, caring and a guy you'd want to have in your corner. He's a lead character you can't help but get behind and cheer for.What sets off these relationships, and indeed the whole book, is Miller's dialogue and descriptions. Miller's prose are folksy, real, gritty, and so addictive to listen to. I don't think I would have enjoyed the written book as well. The audio just brought the novel to life. The descriptions of the mines and the men who work them were atmospheric (and for this reader claustrophobic!) I could taste the coal dust as the men emerged into the light.Now, I need to mention the mystery as well - which was wonderfully plotted. I couldn't predict where the story was going to go and happily went along for the ride through the back roads of Little Egypt, eager to join the search for the photographer.This is the first in a planned series and I will absolutely be listening to the next entry. Highly recommended. Down Don't Bother Me is a great entry in the 'grit lit' genre. Fans of Elmore Leonard's Justified will enjoy this novel.
  • (2/5)
    Slim stumbles into a mess when he agrees to search for a missing photographer for the owner of the coal mine that employees him. Reluctant to accept the assignment at first, he succumbs to the offer of a fully guaranteed pension. Slim soon finds himself the target of two (semi) professional assassins, Jump Down,the reputed leader of a meth gang, and Yellow Don, the owner of a competing coal mine. What's more, the police are threatening to charge him for the murder of the two would be assassins, a private detective is hunting for him with evil intent, Anci, his daughter has become a target, they need to leave home and hide out in local fleabag motels to avoid the gaggle of bad guys searching for them, and Peggy, his girlfriend has reservations about associating with him any longer. Unfortunately, this is all less interesting than you might imagine. Down Don't Bother Me is a redneck version of literary fiction; the plot takes a back seat to character development and careful attention to words. The plot is so weak you will soon conclude that everyone in the book is just plain stupid, Anci and Peggy excepted. The plot, for that matter, isn't much off from stupid. At one point Slim, his pal Jeep, and the PI who had beaten him previously invade a cabin in the woods to shoot it out with six heavily armed thugs. Lots of shots are fired, knives are employed, and … Guess what! Yellow Dog descends the stairs, they all sit down and discuss the issue, and Slim and his pals accept Yellow Dog's word that instead of continuing to try to kill Slim he will spend millions of dollars to clean up an environmental disaster he has been trying to hide. Yeah, that sounds plausible.I lost track of the number of times Slim gets knocked on his ass, but that is Miller's go-to solution every time the action slows and the plot bogs down. It got to be so boring that 82.2% of the way through I seriously thought about putting the book down and walking away. Being somewhat OCD, I didn't and found that Miller had a surprise ending in store for those who persisted. The ending didn't make a lot of sense, but still, it was a surprise.Down Don't Bother Me has one saving grace. Miller's use of metaphor, simile, and backwoods idioms is marvelously inventive. "[a look] like you want to kick a hole in the baby Moses," "[she had] a figure that would have made Jesus punch a mule," "widemouthed vases coughed dried ornamental grass," "I looked around vaguely for a priest to strangle," [she had] the kind of green eyes a lazy novelist would describe as piercing," and "Turkish hermaphrodite," are just a few. The first half of the book is well worth reading for the pleasure of Miller's colorfully inventive language. Then skip to the last 30 pages for the surprise ending if you are so inclined.
  • (5/5)
    An engaging mystery with a strong sense of place and a well-drawn plot. I really enjoyed the narrator's strong and unique voice, and the diverse and interesting cast of characters who surround him. I'd read another book about these characters in a heartbeat!