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The Song Remains the Same

The Song Remains the Same

Написано Allison Winn Scotch

Озвучено Mia Barron и Carol Monda


The Song Remains the Same

Написано Allison Winn Scotch

Озвучено Mia Barron и Carol Monda

оценки:
3.5/5 (19 оценки)
Длина:
10 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781464038365
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Best-selling author Allison Winn Scotch showcases heroines who face monumental life changes with unmatched fervor and grace. When Nell Slattery awakens in a hospital bed, she cannot remember who she is, much less the horrific plane crash that put her there. Now with the help of her friends and family, she’s beginning to piece her memory back together. But she cannot shake the suspicion that her loved ones are hiding secrets from her.
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781464038365
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

Allison Winn Scotch is the author of the New York Times bestseller Time of My Life and The One That I Want. She lives in New York with her family.


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3.6
19 оценки / 18 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (3/5)
    Nell Slattery is one of two people who survives a plane crash. Her reward for survival is not remembering who she is -- and let the craziness ensue. Against her better judgement, she decides to live day-by-day, trusting her family and husband to tell her what she needs to know. Little does she know it's not really the whole truth. This is Nell's journey to figure out who she is, where she's going and why everyone is lying to her. This book is okay; it could have been better but the focus of the book, and Nell's objectives, kept shifting too often. The part about her father is mostly annoying because nothing is ever really resolved.
  • (2/5)
     Just couldn't take her concerns seriously.
  • (4/5)
    When Nell wakes up in a hospital, she discovers that she is only one of two survivors of a horrific plane crash that killed over 150 people. However, she has no recollection of the accident or anything else about her life as she has almost complete amnesia and is reliant on her family and close friends to try to make sense of her life. As she starts to piece together what her life had been like, she starts to find fissures in the stories told to her by both her mother and husband and soon finds she can't really trust anyone to tell her the truth about her past. With the help of a budding reporter who wants to use her story to make a name for himself, Nell starts to unravel how her past relationship with her famous artist father has played into the present. Despite her desire to create a fresh new life of "fabulousness", Nell finds that she must first shed the anchors of the past to be free to move into her future.Though somewhat contrived, I enjoyed this novel, though perhaps not as much as "Time of my Life". With the exception of Nell, I didn't find the other characters very endearing as each seemed to be only looking out for themselves. I would hope that if I went through a similar situation that my family and friends would not try to deceive me in such blatent ways. However, I did find the story progressed smoothly and I enjoyed learning more about Nell's life, which was revealed slowly as the novel progressed. A nice summer read.
  • (4/5)
    Nell Slattery suffers from amnesia after surviving a horrible plane crash. As her family and friends gather around her in the hospital and later at home, she struggles to remember bits and pieces of her prior life. Taking clues from her family and friends' stories, pictures, and an iPod playlist of her favorite songs, she starts to build what she imagines will be an improved version of herself. Eventually it comes out that not everyone has been honest with Nell; some are using her amnesia as an opportunity to pretend certain things never happened.This book has a great plot, combining Nell's search for herself and a search for a father who left years ago. The characters' reactions to the situation seem plausible, with people not resisting the opportunity to "start over". But I didn't really feel like I got to know the characters.
  • (4/5)
    This was a fun book. It was well written. The characters were well rounded. I like all her books.
  • (4/5)
    Nell Slattery wakes in the hospital after surviving a plane crash, but can't remember her life, her marriage, her family. Her playlist of songs goes a long way in healing her mind. As her body heals, family members try to help Nell remember her life. But those family members each have an agenda and secrets, and it turns out Nell, too, has secrets. Nell's journey to finding herself ultimately takes her back to her childhood, where family secrets are revealed.Author Allison Winn Scotch deftly leads the reader through Nell's discovery of her life. Music adds great depth to our lives and I loved Nell's playlist. Winn Scotch's ending was very satisfying and I would recommend the book to all modern fiction readers.
  • (5/5)
    Nell was one of 2 survivors of a plane crash. As she tries to regain her memory, she realizes that the person she WAS may not be the person she wants to be.It was interesting to me to see that, when she listened to her gut instinct, she really did "know" what she should do. It's a book that makes you think about choices made for us, choices we make, and why we make them....Usually when there is memory loss in a novel, there will be a dark suspense plot. I loved that the author instead focused on relationships, feelings, and yes...there is some mystery...but not dark and sinister. I don't want to say more, because I don't want to give anything away.I will say: I read a LOT of books, and I devoured this one.
  • (4/5)
    Nell Slattery's life is about to be changed forever in a split second. When she awakens in a hospital room, one of only two survivors of a plane crash, she finds herself without any memories of just who she is, what her life has been up to this point and what has happened to her.Her first moments in the hospital have revealed to her that she is married to a man in the room she doesn't remember and her mother is there, again someone she doesn't recognize. After meeting with Anderson Carroll, a big name celebrity, she learns that she was his hero while the plane was going down. Apparently while he had too much to drink and was beginning to panic, they discussed their favorite bands and music in hopes it might take their minds off of what was going on around them.Aside from this conversation, she finds both herself and Anderson on the front cover of People magazine and sees a picture of herself that she can't remember, but mostly doesn't show her as someone she would like to know more about. While Nell learns that her husband has been having an affair with a co-worker writing music jingles, she works with Jaime Reardon, an up and coming news reporter to help her investigate her own life and hopefully begin to make some positive changes into the person she would like to become.In the novel The Song Remains the Same by Allison Winn Scotch, Nell's life is choreographed to some familiar music that ties in with chapters of her previous life throughout the book. As Nell begins to unravel her past and begins to rebuild a better future for herself, as a reader we begin to wonder what would we do if faced with similar circumstances in our own life. Would you reinvent yourself or pursue digging into a self discovery and hope you find something you like? This is just what the character of Nell does when given a second chance so to speak. Whether she gets her memory back or not, will have to wait until you, yourself, get an opportunity to read this novel.I received this book compliments of TLC Book Tours for my honest review. I like the character of Nell because even though she can't remember much she takes on a new role in her moving forward with a sense of courage and also one of forgiveness and she tries to find out more about her past she wasn't really interested in much before. I rate this one a 4 out of 5 stars
  • (3/5)
    The story of Nell, a young woman who survives a plane crash only to lose her memory. What follows is her search to find out who she was and perhaps who she'll become. I love Allison Winn Scotch's writing. This novel is interesting in the journey it takes the main character on her search. I liked the novel but at times some of the characters annoyed the heck out of me with their treatment of Nell. All in all, I enjoyed it.
  • (3/5)
    A woman wakes up with amenesia. She has no memory of her life before the plane crash (of which she is only 1 of 2 survivors). She has to rely on her family to "relearn" her life and history....but they don't always give her the whole truth. The book is basically the story of her journey to find out who she was and who she is now. I liked the basis of the story, but I thought her past got a little twisted and took away from the story.
  • (3/5)
    Nell, one of only two survivors of a plane crash, returns to consciousness with no memory of her past prior to the crash. Thus, she must rely on those who are close to her (mainly, her mother, sister, & husband) to fill in the blanks & help her restore her life to something resembling normal. But of course, once you lose your memory, nothing is ever really "normal" again. As she begins to reassimilate, she discovers that the important people in her life aren't necessarily telling her complete truths. Ultimately, I really wanted to like this novel more than I did. I thought it was an interesting storyline, but not carried out to its full potential. Though it's largely somewhat of a "finding yourself" story, I found the main character of Nell wishy-washy and really rather whiny. While the story makes her out to be perhaps not the most likeable character before the plane crash, her attempt to become a different, possibly better person after the fact wasn't really successful, in my opinion. I enjoyed the gradual discovery of Nell's past as the story unfolded, but something about her characterization didn't settle well with me.
  • (4/5)
    When I won this book, about a plane crash survivor with amnesia, I thought it might be a psychological thriller. The jacket copy hints that protagonist Nell's family and friends may not be telling her the truth about her pre-crash life, so I figured I might be getting something along the lines of S.J. Watson's Before I Go to Sleep. However, while there are plenty of secrets to be uncovered here, the tone of this book is not that sinister. It's more of a family drama and--strange though it might seem, since Nell is in her thirties--a kind of coming-of-age story. It's the story of both Nell's rediscovery of who she used to be and figuring out who she is (and wants to be) now. In her former life, Nell was a music lover (and talented musician in her own right), and some of her old favorite songs trigger memories for her. Accordingly, some of the chapters are titled with these songs, while the rest of the chapters are only numbered. It would have made more sense to me to break the book into sections, each with a song title, but that's a minor quibble. The copy I read was an ARC, and it definitely still needed some final editing, but overall it was an enjoyable read, with realistic dialogue and vivid descriptions. It was a quick read, but one that still resonated with me.
  • (4/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book, although it did stumble in a few places. I give the author credit for writing such a complicated situation, especially from the first person point-of-view. This novel is primarily told from the view of Nell Slattery, a woman who awakes from a coma with no memory of any events or people from her life. She soon learns she survived a horrible plane crash, but the only details disclosed are those told to her by the one other survivor who credits her with saving his life (who just happens to be a B-list movie star). As she awakens and moves through her recovery, her memory does not return and she is dependent on those around her to fill in the details of her life. These are primarily her mother, husband and sister. Gradually she learns the information is true in general terms but not so much specifically. For instance, while she was married at the time of the crash her marriage was in turmoil - a fact her husband keeps from her. Eventually other, greater, revelations occur prompting Nell to regain larger chunks of memory and force her to choose how she wants to live the rest of her life: complacency or active change.The novel is advertised as asking: "Who are we without our memories? And how much of our current self is defined by our former self?" I believe this book made a strong effort to answer these questions, although it was awkward at times and relied too much on plot twists at other times. For example, Nell was recalling her husband's infidelity and her mother's lies, trying to determine how to deal with those in absence of full memory return. This provided an excellent chance to thoroughly explore that through the character, forcing her and the audience to look deep inside for answers. However, before she could delve into this she took off to find a house from her memories (after she just happened to find the key) where she discovers a half-brother she never knew she had (although she had vague memories of him from childhood). This new plot twist took her character and the audience off into a new direction.I see a novel like this as a wagon wheel. Nell and her memory loss are at the center, which the various spokes representing her primary memory centers (marriage, mother/sister, children, childhood, work, etc.). It would be tempting to follow each of these spokes, for they all depend on one another to make the wheel work as it should. However, there also has to be that outer circle that keeps these spokes reigned in and balanced. In this book, it appeared that outer circle was missing. Her career had a very short spoke compared to her childhood which has a very long, crooked spoke. It is easy to see how difficult it would be to control this type of book. I would like to have seen the author concentrate on one area more specifically. It seems the emphasis was on her childhood experience with her father and how this shaped her entire life. If so, then all other aspects should have revolved around this issue asking the questions of why. Why did she pick a husband like Peter? Why did she pick her career? Why did she not stand up to her mother? Those questions were presented, but they were lost among sideline stories such as the actor, the paparazzi, the long lost brother, etc. I can even understand the desire to make herself over. As a middle aged housewife and mother to five children, I can only imagine waking in a hospital with no memory and a picture of myself on the cover. I know that if I saw that picture, I would want to make myself over into Angelina Jolie - the cool, gorgeous, exciting mom. Without memories or any anchors, perhaps creating a new "you" would provide the security - something to anchor yourself with during a time of change. Scotch knows how to keep up reader suspense which is not easy. I do wish she could find a way to put in the information presented in third person without using the third person italic chapters. For most of those, I didn't really need the information. In fact, I kind of regretted reading them thinking it added more to the suspense to always be in the same situation as Nell - not knowing what was going on in someone else's head and dependent only on what we saw and heard. All in all, I read this book very quickly. I was always anxious to find out what happened next, which is the mark of good writing. I give it four stars out of five: would recommend to a friend.
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a woman who is one of two survivors of a plane crash. She has no memory of the crash, or anything else that was once her life. She tries to get answers from her mother, sister and husband but all that she can get from any of them is half truths. I tried putting myself in her place and I don't know which would be more frustrating... having no clue what the past held, or wondering what exactly it was that everyone was hiding from her. Nell handles the dilemma as well as to be expected. This book was hard to put down. I kept turning the pages wanting to know exactly what shaped Nell into the person she had turned into. I wasn't disappointed.
  • (3/5)
    I was excited to receive a copy of this novel through LibraryThing Early Reviewers. I have been especially drawn to books about amnesia lately, and this was a unique story. Nell was one of only two survivors of a plane crash, and while she tries to recover her memory she also decides to reinvent herself. She isn't thrilled with who she thinks she was, although her beliefs about the "old Nell" are based mainly off of other's accounts. She slowly discovers that her loved ones are distorting the truth. She forms a friendship with a reporter who agrees to help her find the truth about her life while she let's him tell her story.This book was overall an enjoyable read. It's pretty light despite the serious events involved. Music (Nell's playlist of favorite songs) was used to show more about who Nell really was. It also triggered several of her memories in the story. I didn't really like the chapters in which the viewpoint switched to other characters. I don't think the story needed that. I also thought there were too many annoying references to the Friends series, and possibly not enough focus on the actual plane crash. I would recommend it to friends looking for light reading.
  • (3/5)
    Nell is one of two survivors of a widely-covered plane crash. When her physical injuries heal, her amnesia remains and she has to be introduced to the people in her life, including a husband, mother, sister and missing father. As she finds her way, she is able to reinvent the parts of herself that she finds she didn't like. This is a book that is easily read; however, there is nothing memorable about it.
  • (4/5)
    I really, really liked this book. It's so compulsively readable! And it helps that one of the main themes of the book is music, and furthermore it's music that I know and love. I can't relate to Nell in the obvious sense--I don't have amnesia, after all. But I liked her. I really liked her, and I liked her journey. I can't wait to give this book to other readers, because I do feel like it's appealing to lots of different types of readers. My one teensy quibble is that I really hate books with such...unsettled endings. I want to know, dammit! I want to know what happens to Nell and Anderson! To Nell and Rory! Sigh. Small quibble. Such a good book otherwise.
  • (4/5)
    I received this book through Goodreads giveaway program. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this novel about a woman who loses her memory after a plane crash and tries recreating her past through other people's memories of her. I found Nelly utterly believable, though the people around her were almost stereotypical through her eyes. Sometimes a person wonders what life could be like if they got a chance to start fresh, with no influence from the past to hinder them. This novel delves into that, and tackles the question of whether a person is who they are despite the past or because of it. I enjoyed the fresh revelations that kept cropping up despite her family's best efforts to suppress them, and the way each new thing could entirely change Nelly's outlook on life. Great book.