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Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close


Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

оценки:
4/5 (263 оценки)
Длина:
10 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 2005
ISBN:
9781436101639
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Примечание редактора

Emotionally gripping…

This stunning story of a precocious nine-year-old boy, who struggles with issues of loss and family, captured the attention of a nation grappling with the aftermath of the attacks on 9/11.

Описание

Jonathan Safran Foer emerged as one of the most original writers of his generation with his best-selling debut novel, Everything Is Illuminated. Now, with humor, tenderness, and awe, he confronts the traumas of our recent history. Nine-year-old Oskar Schell has embarked on an urgent, secret mission that will take him through the five boroughs of New York. His goal is to find the lock that matches a mysterious key that belonged to his father, who died in the World Trade Center on the morning of September 11. This seemingly impossible task will bring Oskar into contact with survivors of all sorts on an exhilarating, affecting, often hilarious, and ultimately healing journey.
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 2005
ISBN:
9781436101639
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER is the author of the novels Everything is Illuminated and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, and a work of nonfiction, Eating Animals. His books have won numerous awards and have been translated into 36 languages. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.


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Что люди думают о Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

4.1
263 оценки / 255 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (1/5)
    Only finished this book as I was reading it for a book group challenge otherwise it would have been abandoned.
  • (4/5)
    A remarkable book, but in the end I'm not convinced Foer carries it off. The idea, seemingly Tristram Shandy meet Huckleberry Finn, combined with the cross generational juxtaposition of 9/11 and the bombing of Dresden, is vast. Yet - and perhaps I am an obtuse reader - the links were often unclear, the leaps befuddled. The writing is tender, yes, but I'm not convinced. Nice try but no coconut?
  • (3/5)
    It was a bit hard to follow with flashbacks and different narrators. Realistic presentation of effects of trauma on a child.
  • (5/5)
    Oskar Schell is a nine-year-old boy living in New York City, and trying to cope with the terrible loss of his father in the Twin Towers on 9/11.

    Shortly after that horrible day, Oskar finds an odd-looking key in a vase stored on a closet shelf. It's inside an envelope, on which someone has written one word: Black. He seizes on this, and decides that he has to find the lock that the key fits, to learn something important about his father. Concluding that "Black" must be a person's name, Oskar sets out to meet every person in New York City with the last name of Black, and find out who has the right lock.

    In the process, Oskar meets all kinds of people, from an amazing range of backgrounds. But in between Oskar's adventures, we learn the stories of Oskar's grandmother, and his grandfather, the husband who left her forty years ago, for reasons he never explained. As the three Schells tell us their stories, a fascinating family history unfolds, and we explore complex and multilayered relationships. Further layered in are Oskar's memories of his father, and the games and stories his father shared with him.

    Oskar is smart, lonely, grieving, and coping in his own way, which is often baffling to the adults around him. That's perhaps only fair, since their ways of coping baffle him, too. He's an interesting and likable kid, and anyone who has lost a parent too young, or survived the events of 9/11 will relate to him. I'm very glad I finally stumbled across this book; I'm sorry I missed it when it first came out.

    Highly recommended.

    I bought this book.
  • (3/5)
    Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close: A Novel
    By Jonathan Safran For
    2005
    Houghton Mifflin

    Sad.....Brilliant.....Devastating

    This book is creative, and thought provoking. It will put you through the cycle of emotions from sad to happy....and everywhere in between. This was a fantastic story of the ll tragedy abd loss of 9/11, and the desperate search for meaning.
    Nine year old Oskar Schell lost his father in 9/11, and the devastation of the World Trade Center. After he learns of his father's death, Oskar finds a mysterious unidentified key in the pocket of a coat in his closet, and sets out on a journey that will take him through all 5 boroughs of New York, meeting fasvinating, strange and mundane people, learning of their lives and stories along his way. Oskar is determined to find the lock that opens with this key....he is relentless and obsessed.
    Totally recommended.....
    This is also a motion picture starring Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock.
  • (3/5)
    Started well, continued not so well and finished unevenly. There was a sentimentality, particularly with the grandparent voices that alienated me in the end.
  • (2/5)
    Will try again in a few months. Only got a quarter of the way through and couldn't get into it at all.
  • (5/5)
    What a great book!
  • (3/5)
    Oskar is a 9-year old boy whose mission is to find the lock that fits a mysterious key belonging to his father, who died in the World Trade Center on 9/11. His search through the five boroughs of New York brings him into contact with many different characters. This story was a little heavy on the melodrama, and the character of the precocious child has been done to death, but I still enjoyed this story for what it was. I remember that the lock reveal at the end was a let down to me.
  • (5/5)
    I rarely read fiction (my forte is history) and especially not books that have strange pages with blots of ink and typographical distortions on them, but I chanced upon this paperback on a 'discarded book' shelf of a ship and opened it to a random page. Others have summarized the story and discussed whether the young hero has Asperger's Syndrome or not and I have little to add to the number of fine reviews here on Goodreads of this incredibly witty and moving book ... except to say that it has forced me to rethink my moratorium on reading fiction. I really never thought that could happen, and it just did.
  • (5/5)
    Young Oskar is traumatized (who wouldn't be?) by the death of his father on 9/11. He finds a key in a jar in his dad's closet and goes on a search around New York for clues as to what it opens. Oskar also seems to have some special needs (autism? aspergers?) and thus, his narration is not necessarily reliable. I was more than a little concerned for Oskar as he traversed NYC ostensibly alone, and knocked on doors of complete strangers in various neighborhoods. Between that and trying to diagnose him (I used to be a social worker), I had a hard time with this at first. However, the story drew me in and forced me to suspend some disbelief as the cast of characters assisted Oskar and his family with their grieving process. I was also compelled, soon after reading, to view the film based on this novel, which was excellent and poignant. This book is extremely touching and incredibly well-written. (Sorry, I couldn't resist).
  • (3/5)
    Mixed reaction... On the one hand, I think Foer did well with the Asberger's/autism. BUT, I find the thoughts, language, experiences (classmates, other interactions) he related completely incongruous with the thoughts, language and experiences of a boy as young as his main character. Couple the very bizarre interludes that seem aligned with the character, but out of character for the characters being portrayed. I guess Foer used them as a devices to convey the different world of the autistic mind. Excellent primary narrative, averaged with substandard secondary stories, yields a middling three stars
  • (3/5)
    Do I like it? Or is it too cleverly manipulative? An adult's kids' book??
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed some parts of this book a lot and others were a little boring. Some things were repetitious and some parts didn't hold my interest. The parts of the book from the boy's POV were the most interesting. The character we didn't find out much about was the mother and I wanted to know more about her. The grandmother and grandfather were somewhat interesting but also kind of a mystery. They seem to do a lot with no income. I found out more about them than I really wanted to know.
  • (5/5)
    Wow. This book is beautiful, painful, haunting, uplifting, powerful -- so many things. The writing is superb, the plot is complex and mesmerising, the characters -- you just fall in love with them. This is a book that will stay with me a long time.
  • (4/5)
    Had an interesting collection of pictures and word painting to add to the story.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books I have read in a long time. I believe it has made it to my top 10 and possibly even my top 5. His characters are so well written and unique. So many things spoke to me in this book... things I experienced but I couldn't express and Jonathan Safran Foer put them into the words that I never could. I would recommend this book to EVERYONE. I finished it quickly and it saddened me when I turned that last page. Ending a good book is terrible because you know you won't have that wonderful experience for a very long time. This is what this book does, it gives you that feeling... the feeling of loss, loss over an excellent reading experience that only happens a few times in your life. Pick it up, read it and love it... you won't regret it, I promise you.
  • (5/5)
    a beautiful book. funny and innocent but deeply profound. the world unfolded therein seems like a bittersweet and cherished memory to me, informing my life as no other book has.
  • (4/5)
    This was a surprising read for me. I listened to it on audio or I might have put it down. I would have missed a great story. I laughed, I cried, I listened and thought...And I finished it on 9/11. Lots of heart in it.
  • (5/5)
    Extremely moving & Incredibly touching! If you're ready for a 9-11 story, let this be the one you choose.
  • (3/5)
    Nine-year-old Oskar Schell is an inventor, amateur entomologist, Francophile, letter writer, pacifist, natural historian, percussionist, romantic, Great Explorer, jeweller, detective, vegan, and collector of butterflies. When his father is killed in the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Centre, Oskar sets out to solve the mystery of a key he discovers in his father's closet. It is a search which leads him into the lives of strangers, through the five boroughs of New York, into history, to the bombings of Dresden and Hiroshima, and on an inward journey which brings him ever closer to some kind of peace.Oskar Schell comes across as being both autistic and/or simply an exceptionally brilliant child. If it weren't for the book's description I'm not sure I ever would have known Oskar's exact age, only an approximate range. If he is supposed to be autistic he would certainly be considered high functioning; he has some personality traits that are formidable, as well as others that are blindly naive. Yet for all his questions and observational skills, he keeps missing the obvious. Maybe that is an intentional storytelling device on Foer's part, or perhaps it is simply appropriate for the character's age.I found the way the book bounced between voices/points of view to be somewhat confusing, in part because it sometimes took a bit to determine who the narrator was at that moment, or because the narrator was so hard to follow to begin with. Oskar's grandfather, Thomas, was often the most challenging to follow due to his personal issues. But then again, the way Foer handled conversations was also a bit of a challenge in places, thanks to his penchant for having entire conversations flow without ever naming the speaker more than once. So the reader is swimming in a sea of quotation marks, rarely a name in sight to help keep them afloat.While the story is sad, and at times entertaining, I often found it to be teetering on edge of being more effort than was worth the reward. That makes it a personal challenge, as well as setting it up so that I want to see if the ending is worth all the work put into getting there. As of now I remain undecided. After some time away from the book to reflect, I find myself feeling more friendly toward it. For all the Oskar is a handful, there are certainly parts of him that are relatable, and some things that are universal to all children. Of course he expresses those things differently than his peers, but that is part of his naive charm.The history and stories are wonderful, so full of emotion that it's like you are living them yourself as opposed to hearing about them. I deeply appreciated the way Foer handled 9/11 and all of the issues it brought up for everyone (and I'm certain still does today). He didn't shy away from it, nor did he wallow in shocking aspects simply to get an easy reaction from the reader. He was as tactful as a hyper-intelligent 11-year-old boy can be, which oddly enough was more tactful than many adults even today.In my opinion this was a very aptly named book. The title suits the stories on numerous levels, and while the two parts of the title are issues for me, this was a good way to help explore my own personal foibles, all the while learning other methods of coping via the experiences of Oskar and all those he interacts with throughout the story. This is a good book to read when you want to learn something new about yourself. I suspect that no matter how many times a person were to read it, they'd take away something new each time.
  • (4/5)
    A boy struggles with the loss of his father in the Twin Towers. Foer's technique of pushing the boundaries of reality draws on the tradition of Kafka and Grass. I found the book quite moving.
  • (5/5)
    I picked up Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close at the suggestion of my friend's girlfriend. I don't really know this girl, since the two of them started dating fairly recently, but after talking to her for a bit, I thought she was really cool and I wanted to know more about her.

    Fortunately, we started talking about books, which is one of the best ways to get to know someone. We exchanged favorites, and ELaIC was high on her list. I got it from the library the very next day and started reading almost immediately.

    I loved it. The story was heart-wrenchingly sad and beautiful, but still remained believable. In addition to a good story, I found its style to be intriguing. Foer breaks a lot of traditional rules of writing, but I liked most of them. They felt right. Except the dialogue breaks. All the dialogue runs together and I'm not a big fan of that style, so if that kind of thing really bothers you, I probably wouldn't recommend it. If you can look past it, you really should try this out.

    And now I feel like I understand my friend's girlfriend much better. Hopefully once you read this, you'll feel like you understand both of us.
  • (5/5)
    I thought this was a fantastic book. It was easy to read but very thought-provoking and even mysterious at times. Throughout the story you begin to feel attached to the characters and the tasks they have set before them.Connecting this book to a curriculum would not be too difficult, but might be met with some resistance. There is some profanity used and some sexual situations, although not overly graphic. It could be used in a high school English course in the context of recent history.
  • (2/5)
    Usually when I review a book, be it on Goodreads or in my head, I'm drawn to point out what I think the book is really about--the themes underlying it, what you'll think about lying in bed the night after you finish the last few pages.

    For this book, I couldn't.

    Foer's prose was awesome, yeah. And the story itself was interesting and kept me wondering what was going to happen.

    And then.

    Nothing. Nothing happened.

    The ending was so completely unfulfilling to me. I was ready to cry with Oskar or to rejoice once I found out the puzzle, and in the end I just put the book down, did a quick Google search to see if I was missing anything extremely obvious and meaningful (sadly, I wasn't), and wondered what all of the hype was about.

    It was a decent book, I'll give it that much. It was a quick read, I love the way that Foer experimented with the words and pictures on the page, and the idea was very interesting. He tried to make it all very meaningful and important but I just didn't connect on that level. To me some of the stuff he said just seemed surface, like he was trying too hard--way too hard--to create some super mega intense meaning out of a kid eating breakfast with his mother.

    Maybe that's his point, but I don't know. I just didn't really get it.
  • (4/5)
    This is a witty and interesting book.
    My only issue is that Oskar is too precocious for some of the situations.
  • (4/5)
    He had me page after page 'til the end but since the story is meaningless it is no wonder that the end was as he made it. There is no real answer to tragedy of course. I thought Foer tracked as close as he could to saying that the American bombing of Dresden was as incomprehensible and tragic as was an Islamist attack on 3000 civilians, that is, "we" are as implicated in the mess as anybody.
  • (4/5)
    This book is so beautifully written. It combines various perspective, time shifts, internal monologue, journal entries, entries and photographs to tell the story. Nothing here is wasted. It was a slow read for me, since I wanted to savor each line, let it take root in me, and read more. I highly recommend this very unusual book.
  • (4/5)
    READ IN DUTCH

    My expectations were really high on this one! Many people told me just how much they enjoyed this book and how special it was.

    For myself, I had to admit that I did like the title.



    In the beginning I had to get used to the style and the use of different types throughout the story. After some time, that was fine, though not as great as I had hoped for. The story is a search in which I believed some steps were a bit too convenient for our main character. I found it interesting to read about the aftermath of 9/11, the effects it had on the people involved.



    Overall, I liked reading it, but as happens quite often, when you have such great expectations, reality can't live up to it.
  • (5/5)
    Extremely wonderful. Thoughtful, emotional and so much more. A story or rather stories.
    Have we librarians not met on Oskar along the way?
    Don't think I could see the movie. That reservoir of tears would over flow.