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The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

Написано Marie Kondo

Озвучено Emily Woo Zeller


The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

Написано Marie Kondo

Озвучено Emily Woo Zeller

оценки:
4.5/5 (1,033 оценки)
Длина:
4 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 6, 2015
ISBN:
9781494578947
Формат:

Примечание редактора

Cleaning classic…

It’s a classic for a reason: Japanese cleaning consultant Marie Kondo’s book on her KonMari Method — which involves clearing and organizing your items by category — sheds light on so much more than cleaning house. Learn the nitty-gritty after watching Kondo work her magic on Netflix’s “Tidying Up With Marie Kondo.”

Описание

Despite constant efforts to declutter your home, do papers still accumulate like snowdrifts and clothes pile up like a tangled mess of noodles?

Japanese cleaning consultant Marie Kondo takes tidying to a whole new level, promising that if you properly simplify and organize your home once, you'll never have to do it again. Most methods advocate a room-by-room or little-by-little approach, which doom you to pick away at your piles of stuff forever. The KonMari Method, with its revolutionary category-by-category system, leads to lasting results. In fact, none of Kondo's clients have lapsed (and she still has a three-month waiting list).

With detailed guidance for determining which items in your house "spark joy" (and which don't), this international bestseller featuring Tokyo's newest lifestyle phenomenon will help you clear your clutter and enjoy the unique magic of a tidy home—and the calm, motivated mindset it can inspire.

Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 6, 2015
ISBN:
9781494578947
Формат:

Об авторе

Marie Kondo is a tidying expert, bestselling author, star of Netflix’s hit show, Tidying Up With Marie Kondo, and founder of KonMari Media, Inc. Enchanted with organizing since her childhood, Marie began her tidying consultant business as a nineteen-year-old university student in Tokyo. Today, Marie is a renowned tidying expert helping people around the world to transform their cluttered homes into spaces of serenity and inspiration. In her #1 New York Times bestselling book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying, Marie took tidying to a whole new level, teaching that if you properly simplify and organize your home once, you’ll never have to do it again. Marie has been featured in Time magazine, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, The Times, Vogue, The Ellen Show as well as on more than fifty major Japanese television and radio programs. She has also been named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World.


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Отзывы критиков

  • Spark joy in your life using the KonMari Method of organizing your home. Japanese consultant Marie Kondo promises one systematic and sweeping clean will keep your house clutter-free for life. Find new inspiration under all the things you've relegated to the donation bin.

    Scribd Editors
  • Yeah, we've marketed the other books in this list as the antithesis to Marie Kondo's "does this item bring you joy?" tactics, but we'd be remiss to leave off her book. If you haven't read "The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up" before, this spring's the perfect time.

    Scribd Editors

Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    Loved this book! I am always decluttering but it seems like I can never get through the entire house. With Marie's way to declutter I feel I will be very successful this time around. I can't wait to tackle my house. I listened to the audiobook and took lots of notes while listening. I would purchase this book but then that would defeat the purpose of getting rid of things.
  • (4/5)
    This is a delightfully well-written and soothing book, enjoyable even if you never plan to follow her approach (although if you are drawn to pick it up you are surely looking for some help decluttering).
  • (3/5)
    I'm excited to apply a lot of these lessons to tidying up my own house. I'm also happy to know that I was already doing quite a few things right. There are some rather dubious philosophical ramblings that I had a hard time taking seriously. For a self-help book, I really enjoyed it.
  • (4/5)
    Magic is not quite the word to describe Kondō’s method of simplifying your life by tiding up. It’s more a spiritual discipline of decluttering your life starting with your home environment. It starts with the conversion experience of getting rid of the accumulated clutter of your personal possessions in a half-year discarding marathon. Keep only those things that “spark joy” in you and get rid of the rest. Do this by touching each item, and if it does not spark joy in you, then you thank it for what it has done for you in the past and let it go. Treating your home and everything in it as an animate object with feelings will lead you to a state of mental serenity, and although the process may be difficult, it will be worth the effort.
  • (4/5)
    If I ever get it together to ruthlessly de-clutter I'll do it the Marie Kondo way. In the mean time I have a better way to fold my tshirts.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed reading this book. It was a quick and easy read. I loved learning about Marie Kondo's form of tidying although I've only learned about her recently from online posts of amusement by her statement that people should not own more than thirty books. I experienced many emotions reading about her life and her theory of tidying. I was in complete agreement when she spoke about ridding oneself of clothing that did not spark joy. Then she approached the topic of books. Not only do I love reading and have amassed a large collection of books that I yet have to read and with which I am unwilling to part. I also have a Little Free Library and accept book donations almost continually in order to stock it and collect books for another book group to which I belong called BookCrossing. Oddly, being affiliated with both of these organizations, the more books I try to give away, the more books come back to me. The author said something similar in her narrative about what you give away comes back to you.Then there were parts of this book in which I thought the author was a little too OCD even for me. That's okay because it makes her happy. I like some of her ideas, even the ideas about talking to inanimate objects and showing your appreciation of them in that way. It sounds odd, but it's just the sense of not taking things for granted and appreciating what you have supporting you which i feel is important. I'm glad that the author found a successful career at doing what she most loves. I also like that she is Japanese as I'm interested in the Japanese culture. I was wondering, though, if her job were not made much easier by tidying small, neat Japanese homes as opposed to those large messy structures we often call homes near where I live (not in Japan!). Parts of the book made me laugh out loud. They were too over the top for me. However, all of the suggestions the author gave would definitely work for some people. I'll be happy to share her book and her ideas with others as long as she doesn't make me reduce the number of books in my own house!
  • (5/5)
    very useful and original
  • (4/5)
    This book was as fun to read as fiction. It was a “joy” to hold this small, beautifully bond book in my hands. The voice of Marie coming through the pages was fantastic and so unlike most nonfiction, organization type of books.I loved hearing about her KonMari process for tidying which comes down to a few basic principles. One of them being if the item doesn’t bring you joy, get rid of it. And she had stated some surprisingly simple truths such as, a room can only get untidy if you don’t put something back or everything you own doesn’t have a place. Obviously, that is true, but I still have always managed to find some other excuse for my clutter. Maybe I won’t going forward.However, as an overly sentimental person who hates to throw away anything that might have some future use, I found her minimalist approach a little too strict. Plus, I am too busy to set aside 1-2 months for a once-in-a-lifetime tidying of my house project. Although in theory, I see why this is important. Also, routines like removing my shampoo, conditioner, and soaps from the shower, drying them, and putting them away in a closet outside my bathroom just simply isn’t practical for my multi-person household. But reading about suggestions like hers gave me a good laugh and are memorable. And I will likely incorporate some of them into my own routine.Overall, I am very inspired to tidy my house and have already gotten rid of about 8 bags of items without a focused tidying effort, and as I have time here and there, I expect I will continue.
  • (3/5)
    I'm someone who doesn't tend to horde a lot of things but the past few years, excess possessions and clutter have been creeping up. After seeing a couple episodes of Marie Kondo's Netflix series, I decided to pick up two of her books to see if my family could benefit from her technique.Overall, yeah, I think her method of discarding and organizing will help us out. I'm not big on the more emotional aspects - my clothes and possessions having feelings and valuing my gratitude - but I can get behind about 90% of what she had to say.I'm planning to read Spark Joy: An Illustrated Master Class on the Art of Organizing and Tidying Up very soon and then I'll be starting off on reacquainting myself with all of my stuff.
  • (5/5)
    I found this a quick and interesting read. I would say that the book is half how-to and half philosophy or spirituality. It is a very different look at decluttering, being what I would call holistic. My understanding is that the basic concept deals with relationship of person to belongings. The author speaks of all things as having consciousness. Things know their purpose. We get in touch with our feelings about each thing we own and decide based on that whether or not we should keep our hold on it. Letting go of something that does not bring us joy is liberating for both ourselves and for the thing we let go of.

    The author speaks of thanking things we use as we put them away after use. Greet our abode when we come home. Know that it is there to protect us. Gratitude, expressed audibly or silently, is a big part of her thinking. This includes gratitude when we let something go, gratitude for the use of it or for the lesson learned when we found that we had no use for it. But the bottom line is not the practical use for the item, but does it spark joy in us. It is not about deciding what to discard, but rather what we want to keep. And it is about seeing the energy or spirit that is in everything. In seeing things afresh we find more joy in what we have.

    This book is much more than how to organize your stuff!
  • (3/5)
    I have mixed feelings about ths book. I can agree with some parts, strongly disagree with others, and just laugh at the rest. It's cute how she anthropomorphizes objects and living spaces. It's annoying how she repeats herself in several places. I don't think I could ever adopt her philosophy, but it was amusing to read her presentation of it. In the end I spent more time smiling and laughing, so the book brings me joy. If I hadn't checked it out of the library, I would have kept it.
  • (5/5)
    This is a refreshing little book on decluttering that is based on the simple principle that we should only keep things that spark joy. Kondo discusses her method for tidying which goes by categories rather than rooms, starting with clothing. I'm looking forward to putting this into practice!
  • (4/5)
    Found this fascinating, and consumed in a couple of sittings. Marie is a self-confessed obsessive, and I would be interested to know what a psychiatrist would make of her all-consuming passion for tidying and decluttering.The idea of choosing / decluttering all my books in one session, without even being allowed to open them, gives me palpitations. And Marie takes decluttering to a bizarre extreme, suggesting if you have a stock of loo-rolls, to get rid, as you can always buy more when needed!So, I won't be decluttering in one fell swoop as she advocates, but a lot of what she believes did resonate. I realise I do feel calmer in a tidier home, and fewer possessions will make that easier to achieve.
  • (3/5)
    I was lent this book (I don't know why) but see that there may be quite a lot of hints I need to take up.
  • (4/5)
    Love the concept, not totally sure onboard with all the details. What does "spark joy"?
  • (4/5)
    Recommended by BJ. The major element setting her work apart is the idea of keeping only that which is loved and gives joy while using it (even the utilitarian stuff). There are some minor twists on the usual "get rid of things and sort the rest" that are useful, many of which I was doing already. GET CORRECT DATES
  • (5/5)
    The "magical" aspects of this book sometimes came across as a bit silly, and some of the situations seemed totally unrealistic... but I found many of the ideas very thought-provoking. As someone who struggles with clutter, this book provided a unique perspective, and I think that with some modifications, the KonMari method could prove useful to me.
  • (3/5)
    I'm not sure but I think this book might be losing something in the translation, or maybe not. First published in 2011 when the author was 26 years old, for me this book reads like it's been written by someone VERY young. Ideas and methodology are repeated throughout, mantra style almost, and came across sounding like Daily Affirmations. I've never really understood daily affirmations, they obviously work for some people, trouble is they've always sounded like personal brainwashing to me. Maria Kondo is a very successful, Japanese organizing consultant and author however, I fear this book will not resonate with her western culture readers as successfully as it does with her Japanese readers. Maybe it's me but I couldn't do much of what she is advocating in her mindfulness approach to organisation. I will not start thanking my possessions for getting me through the day, for keeping me warm, for making my day successful. Marie Kondo insists that the secret to tidying up is not throwing things away but rather, the secret is in deciding to keep only those things that truly give us joy and happiness. After we make the decision between what gives us joy and what doesn't we can then and only then, say goodbye and thank you to all the things in our homes that don't. I've certainly gleaned some useful ideas about decluttering and I like the idea of storing things vertically instead of horizontally, but as a new way of life or a new enlightened philosophy, this is not for me.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book. It gave me perspective on how to see and analyze my possessions. How some of them are prized, some are useful, and some just take up space. I learned to let go of things I never wanted but felt guilty about having. While I did not act on all the suggestions she made (I'm not getting rid of any of my books!), I had enough of a push to de-clutter and maintain a neater home. I did not use all of her techniques, and I believe they aren't for everyone, but it was a useful and actionable book.
  • (4/5)
    Some of this is a little out there for me (I am not thanking possessions or emptying my bag every single day) - but the concept of getting rid of things that don't give me joy seems to work. I went through shirts and dresses and it was so much easier to actually get rid of things instead of being wishy-washy.

    But I'm ignoring the books sections. That shit is just ridiculous.
  • (3/5)
    There are some good ideas in this book, and it was easy enough for me to read. (Which is not all that common for me with self-help books.) However, a lot of the ideas in the book aren't ones that I'm planning to ever implement into my own life. I will say, though, that it provided me with a helpful list of things I need to tidy up, and a recommended order in which to do that.
  • (3/5)
    I listened to this on audio and it was certainly interesting. It's a bit "out there" on the bizarre scale but some of her ideas are worth keeping. I particularly liked the notion of getting all items of the same type together to weed, rather than one corner at a time. Can't see myself ever doing this level of tidying but it does make you think about the sheer amount of useless "stuff" you bring into your home.
  • (4/5)
    This organizing book leaves you with a different feeling/view on the method for clearing your space of unwanted/unneeded things. The thing I like most about the book was there was no real right or wrong way of doing it; just as every individual is different so will the outcome of process. How many books or pieces of clothing you keep will depend on how they impact your life. Marie Kondo describes everything as having an energy, which you much acknowledge. If the energy does not effect you positively, do you want that around you? And if you thank the object's energy after each use, will you appreciate that object more? It was also innovative to read that sometimes an object's half-use or non-use was entirely its point; i.e. the book you have half read (or unread book that's been hanging around), that you say you'll get back to, was never meant, in your life, to be completely read. This intent to reset the object's purpose makes its reevaluation unique. I read this book with the sole intention of discovering what the chatter was about, and it ended up inspiring me to start taking a look at the objects in my space. However, I'll probably not have the energy to do it all in one setting, as she recommends.
  • (3/5)
    Sheesh!Kondo is really passionate about this, and takes herself a little too seriously.Having said that, if you're feeling like your life is cluttered, this book will totally inspire you to declutter, although I doubt many readers are as thorough about it as Kondo would like.
  • (3/5)
    I have a weakness for self-help books, especially the ones about clutter. This one has an interesting idea, and pretty decent writing. At times I disliked the author's tone, but overall it was okay. I liked bits and pieces of it, but probably won't reread.
  • (5/5)
    Great little book about organizing and decluttering. Excellent tips for storing clothing in drawers, handbags, getting rid of stuff. Really enjoyed it and started immediately.
  • (3/5)
    Right! So I decided to borrow this book from the library as it had great reviews and apparently would change my life. I also wanted to get some ideas about how to make the most of the space in my little house. Now I've read this book in under 24 hours. It is sort of short and sweet. But Marie Kondo is bonkers. Seriously. I mean, I like the idea of getting rid of things that I may possibly never use but I'm not going to take every item of clothing I own and put it in one room and touch everything to see if it sparks joy. There's lots of things that don't spark joy but it's clothes and we need to be practical. My work uniform doesn't spark joy but if I bin that I'll be in trouble at my job. So they have to go in the 'keep' pile. Then do the same for everything in the house basically. I'll have nothing left but hey I guess that's the idea. I've no idea if this concept works and I'll be seeing myself up for failure and I'm not following it as it should be. I've not got time for that. She advised talking to the house! So when I get in, I should say 'Hi house, I'm home!Wtf? Seriously?! I'm not doing that either. Sorry house, not gonna happen. And then take off my shoes and thank them for their hard work, thank my jacket for keeping me warm. Then empty my handbag everyday and tell it ' you did well today, have a good rest! Once the house is tidy, I'll probably lose weight or have diarrhoea. This is because my body can feel that the house has had a detox. So basically I spend all day talking to my clothes, tidying up, getting rid of stuff that doesn't spark joy and then I get the shits as a reward. Great! She also says you may have clearer skin. Who knows? Read the book. If you are interested in tidying your house, get some strange insight to the Konmari technique and it may change your life! As for me, I will use some of the ideas mentioned and already do in fact use some of them. And who knows, maybe my house will be tidy for ever. If this occurs, I'll come back and review!
  • (4/5)
    This book has some good ideas, but is a bit drawn out. I think the main points could easily be summarized in a page of bullet points, although the stories and text is what helps makes her arguments convincing. The section on books and household items will definitely help me downsize my collections, but in other sections there were a lot of ridiculous stories I had to roll my eyes at (like, don't ball up your socks because it will make them unhappy, and your socks perform such an important function you shouldn't make them unhappy.) She also emphasizes having more respect for the objects you own and thanking them for their functions. I don't foresee myself thanking my shoes every time I take them off or unpacking my purse everynight and thanking each object for helping me through the day. But I think her point of this was to make you aware that being aware of things' meanings and purposes will make you only want to have things around you that have a clear purposes and this insight will help you to be careful not to acquire too much clutter in the first place. And that's a good point to keep in mind.If you want to read this, just get it at a library because once you've read it, its purpose will have been fulfilled and you won't need it in your life any longer. Buying it and having it sit on your shelves for who know how long would fly in the face of her methods.
  • (5/5)
    Really enjoyed this book. I haven't applied the method yet, but I can't wait to see what happens. This is in no way an organizational/helpful storage book. If you're looking for "Top 10 storage tricks to make your closet more spacious" this is not the book for you. This is an idea and concept that needs to be fully realized in your own way. The writing can be a bit rough at times and the author sometimes sounds a bit pretentious and repetitive, and there are some cultural differences which might confound or puzzle more literal readers in the United States. Speaking from my own interpretation, I love the idea of surrounding yourself with only things that bring you joy. (Yes, some have criticized the idea of a toothbrush, cleaning supplies, or other necessary household objects never "actually" bringing you joy which I think does this book an injustice by being taken too literally in that manner.) Overall I felt that the author was asking the reader to make a conscious connection with the items and objects we surround ourselves with everyday and to truly appreciate their usefulness or in some cases simply their beauty they bring into our lives. (For example - the act of keeping a food journal. It's not necessarily to guilt you for eating something bad, nor is it really there to make sure you're following a specific diet - it's actual intention is to usually just make you more conscious and aware of the types of food and amounts of food you are putting into your body.)Definitely a read for someone whose mind often feels cluttered when your bedroom or resting space is cluttered and you can't seem to ever completely feel rested in your own environment. Also potentially a good read for someone that is looking to make a change in their life and they don't know where to start? Consider starting with your own possessions and in your own home.
  • (3/5)
    The basic ideas are good - tidying may help you find out what you really like to do and what is important to you and making many many small decisions what to keep may help you get more assurance next time around, and when making other decisions. In addition, you will save time looking for things, tidying and cleaning and - you will acquire less stuff in the future, becasue you will probably make sure that the things do not accumulate in your home again. It all makes perfect sense. However, like most self-help books, this one keeps repeating itself, and that is difficult to digest. I suppose it would have been very short otherwise, and/or some people may even need it, who knows?