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And Only to Deceive

And Only to Deceive

Написано Tasha Alexander

Озвучено Kate Reading


And Only to Deceive

Написано Tasha Alexander

Озвучено Kate Reading

оценки:
4/5 (57 оценки)
Длина:
10 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781494579098
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

For Emily, accepting the proposal of Philip, the Viscount Ashton, was an easy way to escape her overbearing mother, who was set on a grand society match. So when Emily's dashing husband died on safari soon after their wedding, she felt little grief. After all, she barely knew him. Now, nearly two years later, she discovers that Philip was a far different man from the one she had married so cavalierly. His journals reveal him to have been a gentleman scholar and antiquities collector who, to her surprise, was deeply in love with his wife.


Emily's intellectual pursuits and her desire to learn more about Philip take her to the quiet corridors of the British Museum, one of her husband's favorite places. There, she uncovers a dark, dangerous secret involving stolen artifacts from the Greco-Roman galleries. And to complicate matters, she's juggling two very prominent and wealthy suitors, one of whose intentions may go beyond the marrying kind. As she sets out to solve the crime, her search leads to more surprises about Philip and causes her to question the role in Victorian society to which she, as a woman, is relegated.
Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781494579098
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

When not reading, Tasha Alexander can be found hard at work on her next book featuring Emily Ashton.


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3.8
57 оценки / 55 Обзоры
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  • (3/5)
    Fun book. . Lady Emily marries an explorer/adventurer mainly to escape from her domineering mother. Adventurer husband dies, leaving a diary for her to explore. Thro contacts with his friends, she begins to fall in love with him. Then she discovers Philip has been acquiring artifacts for himself, and giving copies to the British museum. Untangling this with the help of his friends takes up the majority of the book. This is a fluff book, but one with an interesting approach to history.
  • (2/5)
    Two stars.... and so begins my descent into cynicism:Fortunately, I was unable to find this book when I was looking to read it. I had hoped to read it before the two others I finished reviewing, yesterday. Had I read this before the other two, I would have put down the series and returned the other two to the Library unread.Lady Emily Ashton had been left a widow too soon after her wedding. Her husband Philip left her to go on a hunting excursion in Africa soon after their wedding and had the unfortunate experience of becoming ill & dying.This book takes place approximately 1.5 years towards the end of her official period of mourning.As Emily only married Philip to escape her harridan of a mother, she never got to know him, nor did she want to. Once she began spending time in the British Museum learning of his love for antiquities & ancient Greek history, she began to fall in love with him, albeit a tad too late.The intrigue begins in Paris where she meets an art forger and learns that pieces in the museum are not what the are suppose to be & that Philip had been secretly purchasing the originals from the black market & sent them all to his country estate.While learning more about her late husband, drinking port w/ her friends, & studying Greek she meets up w/ Andrew Palmer, who was with Philip on his fatal trip to Africa. She also meets Colin Hargreaves. Andrew pursues Emily in a manner most uncomfortable for her and Colin turns up at odd moments making her suspicious of him... and Emily's interest in the forgery of antiquities takes on a consuming desire to uncover the men behind the fakes.Andrew somehow convinces Emily that Philip is still alive (Dr. Livingstone, I presume) and wandering around Africa in a befuddled state and offers to take her out to find him, which Emily paying for it all.So here we go: Emily, who believes her self to be quite right smart, is in reality quite stupid when it comes to judging the true character of the people surrounding her.Emily's mother is an odious harridan, completely disrespecting the fact that Emily is now a widow & free to live her life as she pleases.Emily's friend, Ivy, is a repressed & tiresome married woman, continually spouting the mores of society & the wonders of being a married woman sitting atop a pedestal w/ no thoughts of her own. Emily has two society friends both looking for a husband; one is nastily rude/cutting to others and the other is a simpering idiot.Fortunately, Emily has two strong female friends; Margaret a scholar from the u.s. and the French Society matron, Cecile who both endeavor to help Emily uncover the mysteries she is investigating.So, although I liked the story, I disliked the characters (thus the 2 Stars) and that usually cuts it for me. In subsequent books of the series, Emily brightens up and becomes likable....One glaring thing: according to the book (this is the Victorian era), Emily as an unmarried woman was allowed to have breakfast in bed but as a married woman had her breakfast downstairs.... Which is the direct opposite of what I have read elsewhere. In fact the point was belabored in Downton Abbey, as the spinster sister was still eating breakfast downstairs, while her mother & married sister had their breakfast in their rooms.
  • (4/5)
    And Only to Deceive
    4 Stars

    Lady Emily Ashton is quite relieved when she learns of her husband's death in Africa for their marriage was one of convenience. However, after reading Phillip's journals, Emily realizes that he was a man of great depths with a passion for antiquities and for his wife. Emily's need to know more soon leads her to the British Museum and into a dark and dangerous mystery revolving around stolen artifacts.

    It would seem that historical mysteries with "Lady" in the series title are a big hit for me. Similar to the Lady Darby (Anna Lee Huber) and Lady Julia (Deanna Raybourn), Lady Emily is an aristocrat who finds herself embroiled in mystery and murder as a result of her late husband's lifestyle.

    While not as vulnerable as Keira Darby or as self-assured as Julia Grey, Emily is an engaging heroine unafraid of challenging the social norms and mores of Victorian society. It is entertaining to follow along as she discovers the truth about her husband and about her self. The minor romance is an added bonus although its rapid progression at the end is not all that believable.

    The mystery revolving around the stolen artifacts is compelling mainly due to the allusions to Greek mythology (particularly the Trojan War). That said, Emily is not the best of amateur sleuths. She has a particularly irritating tendency toward making the evidence fit her theory rather than vice versa and there are moments when one has a strong desire to smack her upside to head due to her obtuseness.

    The villain is also rather predictable and it is possible to guess his identity almost immediately.

    All in all, a solid beginning to the series and I look forward to reading more about Lady Emily and her adventures in sleuthing.
  • (5/5)
    Emily is barely past her honeymoon when her husband dies while on safari. At first Emily is not too sad, she barely knew her husband and married him mostly to escape her mother. However, as she learns more about him from friends and his journal, she becomes captivated by the side of him she never got to know. He was a lover of Greek antiquities and the works of Homer. Emily wants to learn more and soon is learning Greek and making the acquaintance of many people, not all of them reputable, who knew her husband, Lord Ashton. Slowly a mystery, evolves. Was her husband the mastermind behind a theft ring? Was he murdered?I really enjoyed this mystery with it look inside upper class Victorian society and this fiesty character. This is the first novel featuring Lady Emily Ashton.
  • (4/5)
    This Victorian mystery-thriller, the first in a series of (so far) three, is an above average tale. Lady Emily Ashton's husband has recently died, and she is compelled to deal with the fact that she has little to mourn for--she barely knew her husband, and accepted his proposal more as a matter of form (and to escape her overbearing mother) than love. This must have been a common occurrence in England of the time, though given the excess emotionalism of the day (smelling salts and lots of fainting were common) I doubt it was much noticed. Emily, however, begins to notice some unusual things about her husband's death. She begins to investigate, and finds that contrary to her own feelings, her husband was actually deeply in love with her. This situation alone raises the book above the average historical mystery. However, Lady Ashton has the misfortune to be one proto-feminist mystery solver among many: Deanna Raybourn's Silence in the Grave has many similarities with this book, and of course, it is tempting to compare this series, with a lead character fascinated with ancient Greece, to Elizabeth Peters' series about proto-feminist Amelia Peabody. Lady Ashton is much more believable than Amelia Peabody, though--Lady Ashton, at least, never spontaneously decides she is going to wear pants rather than skirts. ...Though she does decide that she will drink port with the gentlemen after dinner, rather than flit off to gossip with the women...
  • (4/5)
    Light ,engaging, thoroughly entertaining suspenseful mystery regarding forged art in Victorian London. The female heroine, Lady Emily Ashton, is a young women who marries her husband to escape her mother but becomes a widow and slowly discovers everything about her husband that she didn't know and regrets she didn't make the time for him when he was alive. While she is discovering this she is learning that her husband's death was not an accident and she must learn the truth to fully understand who her husband was.
  • (4/5)
    I love historical mysteries. Victorian England is a particular favorite. I enjoyed this book but knew this was the author's first. The background story and characters were developed better than I expected but the "mystery" was lacking. I hope she builds on the Lady Emily British Museum aspects of the series.
  • (4/5)
    Good book.... interseting and held my attention. Quite a nice suprise!
  • (3/5)
    i can't say that this book lives up to its title - it certainly wasn't suspenseful. the prose and dialogue were stilted, the characters bland, and the pace plodding, which is a shame because the premise seemed to have a lot of promise and about the first page or so caught my interest - art theft and forgery, ancient greece, and tragic love. the plot was also very transparent, and i'm usually not even good about anticipating a book's twists and turns, especially when the book in question is trying to be tricky and suspenseful. other reviews have expressed admiration for the narrator as an uncoventional heroine determined to achieve self-actualization. she rebells against society's strictures, educating herself, drinking port, traveling, and unmasking criminals, all of which is meant to endear her to me as a modern, independent, strong woman, i suppose. but i couldn't engage in the story on her behalf. i found her cold and boring, (mostly because the book just wasn't that well written,) an impersonal guide in the unfolding of a bland mystery. in short, i could not derive even a modicum of enjoyment from this book. boo.
  • (4/5)
    Not bad for what seems to be a series opener (at least according to the little blurb on the back of the cover. More romance-ish than I normally read, but this aspect was kept mostly in check as the author devoted most of the story to the central mystery of the novel. And here it is: did Emily Ashton's late husband Philip traffic in stolen antiquities? Several clues lead to Emily's discovery that the dead husband she didn't love when she married (but as time went on began to appreciate him more after his death) may not have been all that he seemed to be leads her on a quest for the truth. Another author's blurb noted that "had Jane Austen written the Da Vinci Code, she may have well come up with this elegant novel." Don't even go there. A) the book was not even close to something Jane Austen may have written and B) there's not a hint of the Da Vinci Code in this story. But if you like mysteries, the core conundrum was a good one. I'd recommend it for readers who like a good puzzle to solve (this one kept me reading way into the night), or to readers who like books set within this time period. All in all, not too bad for a series debut.I'd give it a 3.5, really, but for some reason, the new system doesn't allow me to put in the half star.
  • (3/5)
    Fairly good historical mystery featuring recently widowed Lady Emily Ashton. Emily was only recently wed to Phillip Ashton when he died of an illness while hunting in Africa. Emily tries to get to know her husband by developing an interest in one of his other hobbies -- Greek antiquities.

    Although the character of Emily was fairly well developed, I thought the author modernized her a bit too much to be believable. The character of Colin Hargreaves however, was extremely appealing. Unfortunately he didn't appear nearly enough in this book to make me happy. Three and a half stars
  • (4/5)
    Lovely book. Plot was detailed and engagaing. Book kept to period details. Characters were likable. Dialogue was entertaining.
  • (3/5)
    just 3 stars...have read similar books done better...nice period details and an engaging heroine but guess the mystery's not the thing with this series...i could see the 'bad guy' coming a mile away. i'm not ruling out reading another one by ms. alexander, however!
  • (4/5)
    I thought this was very interesting, based in Victorian England in the late 1880's Lady Emily Aston accepted the proposal of Philip, Viscount Aston more to escape her mother than for love. A few months later he's dead on Safari and she's a widow who now has more freedom than she ever had before. While her mother wants to see her remarried she is using her mourning period to find out more about her husband and she's finding interests that they could have had in common, but she will never really know. Strangely she finds that there are secrets and lies and people who don't want certain truths to come out.It was an interesting mystery with a lot of introspection on whether or not you really know people you are close to. I enjoyed the read and want more from these people. I really liked Emily and found her growth to be very enlightening.
  • (5/5)
    THIS IS THE FIRST BOOK I HAVE READ FROM THIS AUTHOR AND LOOK FORWARD TO FINDING MORE.
  • (4/5)
    Lady Ashton is unexpectedly widowed shortly after the wedding when her husband dies on safari. Knowing very little of him, she embraces his interests in antiquities and finds herself caught wondering what really happened.Combining the Victorian period restrictions for a woman with the mystery was thoroughly gripping, leading the reader along an unexpected path.
  • (5/5)
    Love the series! Look forward to reading book 2
  • (3/5)
    Where I got the book: bought retail at author eventAnd Only To Deceive was Tasha Alexander's debut novel and the introduction of Lady Emily Ashton. It's the late 1880s, and Emily has been widowed soon after her wedding. As she only married to escape her mother's incessant matchmaking, she is not mourning her husband--until she begins to learn about, and share, his interest in Greek culture and antiquities. She then falls in love with him for the first time, until she begins to discover that he may not have been the pillar of society she thought he was...Lady Emily Ashton has since become the heroine of a series of novels, and I can't help wondering if her tendency to be attracted to every man who shows interest in her (and there are lots, because she is of course rich and beautiful) will continue. In this novel there are three distinct suitors, including her late husband, and Emily oscillates between them as their relative merits and demerits are exposed. If that was meant to be as funny as I found it, then I have to congratulate Ms Alexander on her subtlety.Otherwise, this wasn't a subtle book. The characters are a little two-dimensional and the writing a bit loose - but hey, it's a first novel by a fairly young author, and that's what I got from the book. I also spotted a few anachronisms and Americanisms (the heroine is British) but not so many that I got annoyed; and in any case, this is a lighthearted novel to be gobbled up on the plane, boat or train, despite the detail about the Iliad and Greek antiquities (not strictly necessary in my opinion, but I suppose a widow must have some interests other than men).And I enjoyed the read. A good one for fans of Victoriana, Greece, and writing that's heavy on dialogue and short on emotional depth. I'm hoping that Emily, who seems more passionate about her clothes than anything else, will pick up a little steam when I pick up the next book--which I'm sufficiently intrigued to do.
  • (4/5)
    Loved this book. I wasn't sure how much I would like this series initially, since the Lady Julia Grey books by Diana Raybourne are among my favorite of all time. There are some striking similarities between the two, especially the timely death of the husbands, but I think that is a plot device necessary to create strong, independent women of means in a time when they would otherwise have little autonomy of their own. I am looking forward to the rest of this series as I am looking forward to the progression of the Lady Grey series.
  • (4/5)
    A fun historical mystery with a few twists. Lady Emily, a young widow who barely knew her quickly deceased husband, discovers a passion for his antiquities hobby and uncovers an illegal scheme he was involved in. Lady Emily is an interesting character and she is surrounded a multitude of society characters, some of whom are villains and some simply amusing. I found this novel to be a fun read and a good historical mystery (although not my favorite), and I intend to continue reading this series.
  • (2/5)
    This debut novel seems to be an attempt to imitate the Lady Julia Gray novels of Deanna Raybourn. And Only to Deceive is to be the first of a series of Lady Emily Ashton novels. Both the Lady Julia Gray and the Lady Emily Ashton series combine the Victorian England genre (Jane Austen, Georgette Heyer) with a mystery, and both begin with a young widow as the main character. Unfortunately, Deanna Raybourn does it better. Alexander's novel lacked the witty dialogue typical of the genre. There was plenty of dialogue--perhaps too much, even--but it felt flat, stilted, and unconvincing. Lady Emily, who doesn't fall in love with her husband until nearly two years AFTER his death, seems more ridiculous than likeable. The many references to the Iliad felt pretentious. There is potential for this author to improve her craft, but for the time being, I'd stick with Raybourn.
  • (4/5)
    This is the first book of the Lady Emily series, which is a favorite of mine. Emily is a very strong female character who learns to think and study for herself after her husband's death. When mysterious circumstances are unearthed about her husband's death, Emily has to decide who to trust: Andrew, the man who seems to be in love with her, or her husband's best friend Colin.The Greek antiquities her husband collected become fascinating to Emily, and she starts studying them as well as Homer, the Greek language and other studies. I love that she takes that on for herself, she is such a great character!Speaking of great characters: Colin...oh Colin. He is magnificent book crush material. Strong, smart, handsome, rich and capable. He is also understanding and even approving of Emily's attempts to release herself from the woman's normal role: even when she stays in the room with the other men for cigars and port after dinner! Shocking! But, he is definitely man enough to handle Emily in all her port-drinking-Lady Audley's Secret-reading glory, if Emily wants to let him handle her, that is. When this book ends, the jury is still out on that. She won't give up her new found independence easily.This is a fantastic historical mystery series, with dashes of romance of course. I definitely recommend picking them up! Tasha Alexander really knows how to create fantastic characters and captivating stories!
  • (4/5)
    Here is a book with a great many reviews. I might not have a lot to add. It is set in the very late 1880s. With some flashbacks that take us a few years prior to when Emily, our heroine, came out and her mother pushed her to marry. The mystery involves the sleuthing around copies placed in museums of antiquities so that the very rich could purchase the really thing for themselves. So on this front we have a good, though imperfect mystery. Our sleuth is talked out of direct action with those she is investigating and persuaded to let agents act in her place so we have such encounters second hand. Then we have a dual romance which is much more effective as the indifferent bride and widow learns enough of her husband to fall in love with the man once he is gone. There Ms. Alexander does great service and creates a touching romantic chord.That is enough to decide that the 2nd book in the series might be a worthwhile read as well. There is enough detail and description to give one a feel for the later half of the 19th century, but perhaps more historical setting and detail would be even more appreciated.
  • (3/5)
    I'll definately read another of these, but I don't like them as much as Deanna Raybourne's Lady Julia series. I'm fascinated by the idea that a widow could come to love the *idea* of her husband after he's dead without having loved him while he was alive. This and the Classics angle were both very interesting. Lady Emily herself was interesting and competent and charming and intelligent (educating herself, learning Greek, Suffragette Friends, etc). Then at some point she just...went a little dumb. She got smarter again, and it seemed like Alexander had created a heroine too smart for the simplistic mystery she created. As this is a first novel (and in my state of affairs, I'm extremely lenient about first novels), I'll definately try another. Worth a look if you like the genre.
  • (2/5)
    I've been meaning to read Tasha Alexander's much-touted novel of suspense, And Only to Deceive, for some time now. Set in Victorian England, this is the story of newly widowed Lady Emily Ashton, who is sorting through her emotions over the death of a husband she barely knew and didn't love. As she learns more about the late Philip Ashton, she discovers his deep love for her and begins to reciprocate, alas, too late. At the same time, she becomes involved in the complicated underworld of black-market antiquities, art forgeries, and scandal reaching up to the highest ranks of the aristocracy. Was her husband involved in these unethical dealings before his death? The use of Greek poetry and tidbits of various other classic writings lends the novel an air of elegance, which unfortunately is dispelled by the rather stilted dialogue and plodding plot. Nothing much seems to happen besides a succession of conversations and the occasional passionate kiss. The "mystery" is not terribly compelling, and I didn't find Lady Emily the memorable heroine that so many other readers have. Despite the author's laudable desire to make her characters true to the period (no 21st-century people dressed up in 19th-century clothes), I'm not sure she succeeded. In particular, I found Lady Bromley an unconvincing caricature of a marriage-mad mother, so ridiculous and over the top that she quickly becomes boring. This novel reminded me of Deanna Raybourn's Silent in the Grave and its successors. Fairly enjoyable for an afternoon, but not something to which I'll return.
  • (4/5)
    I received the ARC of the eighth book in this series and due to my compulsions which include having to eventually finish every book I have started I also have trouble starting a series without having read the previous installments. I forced my self through book eight but I knew I wanted to know more of Lady Emily's earlier adventures and this book does not disappoint. Lady Emily comes upon her detective skills quite accidentally. After a brief courtship she marries Lord Ashton mainly to get away from her overbearing mother. Promptly after the marriage Emily's new husband travels to Africa for a hunting trip and dies of what is assumed to be an illness. Emily finds herself a widow before she even had a chance to know her husband. After Lord Ashton's death there is a lot on interest in his personal papers. As Emily attempts to discern the nature of this interest she begins to learn about her former husband and to her surprise he really loved her. He even had a romantic nickname for her that other people knew but to which she was oblivious. As Emily learns more about Lord Ashton she becomes more interested in finding out what he was up to in the days before his death. She is not the only one, his best friend Colin has made it a habit to start visiting Emily. Is he involved somehow in what was going on with Lord Ashton? Lady Emily's discoveries lead her to the British Museum and a world of forgeries as well as the fact that her husband's death may not have been as random as she first thought.I found myself thoroughly enjoying the first installment of the Lady Emily mystery series. Probably the only thing I didn't like was the endless descriptions of all of the poor animals that Lord Ashton murdered. His pursuit of killing an elephant was so disturbing to me that I didn't find the idea that someone might have done in him distasteful at all. I guess killing was the fashion of the time which is why I am glad I live in the time of conservation. Aside from that I loved Lady Emily and her spunk. Fans of Downton Abbey and the cozy mystery will find themselves satisfied here and I look forward to Emily's next adventure and progression in her love life.
  • (5/5)
    Good novels. Very romantic. Young widow finds out that her husband loved her and starts to try and figure out a forgery of Greek artifacts and her husband's death. Next book is a romance between Lady Emily Ashton and Colin Hargreaves, the dead husband's best friend. Also there's the mystery of who is spreading rumors about Emily, who is the Marie Antoinette cat burglar, who is Charles Berry, and who killed Richard Francis. And finally, Emily's nemisis is killed and her friend's husband arrested for the crime. Emily must go to Vienna to figure out the murderer and also to help stop a war between Britian, Austria, and Germany.Delightful reads. The writing wasn't as scintillating as the Lady Julia Grey series, but the plots were better. I also liked how Colin treats Emily as an equal whereas Nicholas always treated Julia as an idiot. Probably not very realistic, but more satisfying.
  • (3/5)
    OK historical crime fiction set in late 19th century Britain, among the upper crust. I didn't find the heroine particularly taking, but the story held my interest long enough to get me through the book. Good stuff for addicts of historical crime novels.
  • (5/5)
    Ahhh. I grinned my way through the entire book. Sure the plot might be similar to a million Mills and Boon Historical, but Lady Emily is a delight, the rest of the characters are a treat, and I haven't been so thirsty since reading Donna Leon.I'd give this to fans of Lady Julia Grey, and maybe to the more romantically inclined Elizabeth Peters lovers.
  • (3/5)
    Not enough tension for my taste. It was a great story which held my attention but there wasn't enough danger or stress to keep me anxious to turn the page.