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Stones on a Grave

Stones on a Grave

Написано Kathy Kacer

Озвучено Anne Marie Damman


Stones on a Grave

Написано Kathy Kacer

Озвучено Anne Marie Damman

оценки:
3.5/5 (9 оценки)
Длина:
4 hours
Издано:
Sep 22, 2015
ISBN:
9781459810914
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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Описание

Sara has never been out of the tiny town of Hope, Ontario, where she has been in an orphanage all her life. After a fire destroys the orphanage, clues about her parentage, a medical certificate and a Star of David, lead her to Germany. Sara arrives in Germany determined to explore her newly discovered Jewish heritage and solve the mystery of her parentage. What she encounters is a country still dealing with the aftermath of the Holocaust. With the help of a handsome, English-speaking German boy, she discovers the sad facts of her mother’s brief existence and faces the horrible truth about her father. Ultimately, the knowledge she gains opens up her world and leads her to a deeper understanding of herself
Издано:
Sep 22, 2015
ISBN:
9781459810914
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге

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3.3
9 оценки / 11 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    3.5 starsThis is part of a series where each book focuses on a different girl. The seven girls that are the focus were all orphans in the early 1960s when the orphanage they lived in burnt down. They are old enough that they are sent away with just a bit of information about who they are. In this one, 18-year old Sara is given enough information to discover that she came from Germany, and her mother was Jewish. She has a bit more information including a couple of place names and the name of a doctor who helped her get to Canada. With some money she’s made working a part-time job, and a little bit given to her from the headmistress of the orphanage, Sara heads to Germany to try to find out more about her past and, hopefully, her parents. I liked this. I’ve enjoyed all the books I’ve read in the series so far. This one spent more time in Ontario before Sara leaves for Germany than the other books did before the other girls left. I particularly liked a couple of the secondary characters who helped Sara in Germany. The info about the Holocaust is kept fairly simple, though. I would have liked a little bit more there, but it is meant for a younger audience.
  • (3/5)
    I wasn't very impressed with the book. The story was good, but it wasn't exactly that in depth. If felt extremely lacking in deeper plot and honestly I thought it felt a little unfinished. Over all though, its a good light read.
  • (4/5)
    I settled in to read not knowing this was a YA book but that didn't impact the overall experience. The protagonist, Sara is one of seven girls in a Canadian orphanage left with nowhere to live after their only home burns down. All she has are bits and pieces of her past; a birth certificate and a Star of David necklace. Until she had been given these clues she had no idea she was Jewish. She sets off on a journey to find out exactly who she is.As Sara follows her clues to Germany she learns the horrors her mother endured as a victim of the Holocaust. She survived only to die shortly after being released. As Sara learns about her mother - and about how she was conceived she has to come to terms with a heritage she is not sure she wants.The book could have been more powerful than it was but on a YA level it did a decent job of delving into the horrors of the Holocaust. It's one of a seven book series - each girl in the orphanage has her own tale. Each book can stand alone. It was a quick read and Sara was a well drawn character.
  • (4/5)
    Kacer has done a good job creating a strong narrative about Sara, the oldest of the 7 long-term orphans at the Benevolent Home for Necessitous (real word) Girls. In 1964, after the old orphanage is burned, these 7 young women are expected to move on and take responsibility for themselves. They are given envelopes with very basic family information to help them learn something about their history. Sara learns that she was born in Germany and her mother, Karen Frankel, was Jewish, and lived in a named DP camp after the war. The envelope includes her mother's Star of David, and the name of the doctor, Gunther Pearlman, who ensured she, an infant, was accepted by United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA), to fly to Canada to begin a new life. Sara decides to travel to Germany. And it is there she is overwhelmed by what she learns about her mother's years of suffering along with so many other Jews. And she is comforted to hear about her love for her husband and new baby daughter. Sara meets other Jews who help her in her search for information, and comfort her when she is shocked and distraught learning about her father. She experiences so many feelings; sadness, anxiety, shock but with her strength, youthful determination, common sense and the emotional support she receives she considers how to proceed with her life, and all its potential. Very good read!
  • (2/5)
    I did not realize that the book I received to preview for LibraryThing was a young adult novel. Although well written and sympathetic to the difficult subject of the Holocaust it was geared for a young reader. I have been reading Holocaust literature, autobiographies and histories for many years,starting with The Diary Of Anne Frank as a young teen. I usually pass my books to a good friend but I will share this one with my 13 year old granddaughter instead.
  • (4/5)
    A lovely piece of historical fiction for YA. I'm hooked enough to want to read about all of the other girls who went off into the world! Somewhere I read that this was recommended for 8th grade and up but I think it's more accurate to say 6th grade and up. The language, concepts, and historical information are simple enough and entertaining enough that I think this would be best suited in a middle school rather than a high school.
  • (4/5)
    I really did enjoy this book, and I actually read it in one sitting! Sara was a surprisingly complex character with feelings and concerns that I could relate to. Going off on your own and trying to find your own path is something that all young people face, including myself. I find the concept of 7 intertwined novels to be very compelling, and I like that they can be read alone in no particular order. I thought that Kathy Kacer treated the Holocaust with all of the gentleness and respect it deserved, while still talking about it in a straight forward day. Like other reviewers, I didn't realize this was a YA novel, but I think that it could be enjoyed by people of all ages. That being said, this book doesn't go extremely in depth about the Holocaust, so some might think it is too shallow. I thought it was perfectly fine in this respect. It was just the right amount to keep the Holocaust from being the over bearing topic of this novel.One thing I wish the author had delved more closely into was Sara's Jewish heritage. There isn't much emphasis Jewish customs at all, despite the fact that she is staying with a Jewish woman and is friends with a Jewish boy. The author did do a good job towards the end (I won't spoil things for anyone, but it's really nice), and I will give her props for that. Despite this, I found the book to be more than enjoyable and would recommend it to friends.
  • (4/5)
    Sara is thrust out into the unknown when the orphanage she's grown up in burns down. She's never known her background and suddenly her house mother drops the bomb shell that she's actually of German Jewish descent. In the 1960's, only a short time after WWII, this still carries an awful stigma. Sara travels to Germany in search of her roots. She finds out her mother survived the death camp, Auschwitz, only to die of TB shortly after being liberated from the tortures no one should EVER have to endure. She also discovers the horror behind her conception and must come to terms with her heritage.This novel is quick paced and engrossing. It gave me a little more information about the Displaced Persons towns that cropped up after the cruel detention camps were closed and so many Jewish people had no homes to return to. I learned a little more regarding this period in history that I find myself drawn to.I look forward to reading the rest of the SECRETS series and learning what each of oldest seven girls from the orphanage discover about themselves using the one or two clues the house mother was able to give them.
  • (4/5)
    This book is part of an interesting series idea. Seven older girls are left homeless after a fire burns down the orphanage. Each book follows a different girl, written by a different author, thus guaranteeing each girl has her own distinct voice. This book follows Sara, the oldest of the seven, who finds out that her mother was a German Jew who didn't survive the Holocaust. Sara uses the little money that she has saved to travel to Germany and unlock her origins. That back of this book states that this is Young Adult for 12+ and I think that is an accurate age assignation. It is simply written which makes the dark content more appropriate for the younger end of the teen spectrum. I thought this was a really interesting book and I like the idea and execution of this series. I received this book from a LibraryThing giveaway.
  • (3/5)
    This book is one (of 7) interconnected novels that can be read separately or together. Set in the 1960s, Sara travels to Germany to find answers about her past and where she came from. She knows little of WWII and this book serves as a good introduction to the war, Germany, and the Jewish people.Stones on a Grave was an emotional, griping read that kept you quickly turning the page, showcasing the best and worst of humanity.
  • (4/5)
    I settled in to read not knowing this was a YA book but that didn't impact the overall experience. The protagonist, Sara is one of seven girls in a Canadian orphanage left with nowhere to live after their only home burns down. All she has are bits and pieces of her past; a birth certificate and a Star of David necklace. Until she had been given these clues she had no idea she was Jewish. She sets off on a journey to find out exactly who she is.As Sara follows her clues to Germany she learns the horrors her mother endured as a victim of the Holocaust. She survived only to die shortly after being released. As Sara learns about her mother - and about how she was conceived she has to come to terms with a heritage she is not sure she wants.The book could have been more powerful than it was but on a YA level it did a decent job of delving into the horrors of the Holocaust. It's one of a seven book series - each girl in the orphanage has her own tale. Each book can stand alone. It was a quick read and Sara was a well drawn character.