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Shadows of Self: A Mistborn Novel

Shadows of Self: A Mistborn Novel

Написано Brandon Sanderson

Озвучено Michael Kramer


Shadows of Self: A Mistborn Novel

Написано Brandon Sanderson

Озвучено Michael Kramer

оценки:
4/5 (663 оценки)
Длина:
12 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
6 окт. 2015 г.
ISBN:
9781427262240
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

The New York Times best-selling author returns to the world of Mistborn with his first audio-book in the series since The Alloy of Law.

With The Alloy of Law, Brandon Sanderson surprised listeners with a New York Times best-selling spinoff of his Mistborn audio-books, set after the action of the trilogy, in a period corresponding to late 19th-century America. The trilogy's heroes are now figures of myth and legend, even objects of religious veneration. They are succeeded by wonderful new characters, chief among them Waxillium Ladrian, known as Wax, hereditary lord of House Ladrian but also, until recently, a lawman in the ungoverned frontier region known as the Roughs. There he worked with his eccentric but effective buddy, Wayne. They are "twinborn," meaning they are able to use both Allomantic and Feruchemical magic.

Shadows of Self shows Mistborn's society evolving as technology and magic mix, the economy grows, democracy contends with corruption, and religion becomes a growing cultural force, with four faiths competing for converts. This bustling, optimistic, but still shaky society now faces its first instance of terrorism, crimes intended to stir up labor strife and religious conflict. Wax and Wayne, assisted by the lovely, brilliant Marasi, must unravel the conspiracy before civil strife stops Scadrial's progress in its tracks. Shadows of Self will give fans of The Alloy of Law everything they've been hoping for and, this being a Brandon Sanderson audio-book, more — much more.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Издатель:
Издано:
6 окт. 2015 г.
ISBN:
9781427262240
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

Brandon Sanderson grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska. He lives in Utah with his wife and children and teaches creative writing at Brigham Young University. He is the author of such bestsellers as the Mistborn® trilogy and its sequels, The Alloy of Law, Shadows of Self, and The Bands of Mourning; the Stormlight Archive novels The Way of Kings and Words of Radiance; and other novels, including The Rithmatist, Steelheart, and Skyward. In 2013, he won a Hugo Award for Best Novella for The Emperor's Soul, set in the world of his acclaimed first novel, Elantris. Additionally, he was chosen to complete Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time® sequence.


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4.1
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  • (4/5)
    I liked this a lot more than the previous book. I suppose that's because the contrast between Alloy of Law and The Hero Of Ages was just too big, and the memories of HoA were still too fresh. Now, with a bit of distance, the book was actually quite well-done. In parts funny, in parts insightful, and generally a good story.
  • (4/5)
    Ah, Sanderson did it again, building political machinations on top of an already complex world. This reminded me that I REALLY need to do an original trilogy reread soon because there are many more references to characters from the old world, with a couple appearances by some...

    The fact that Lessie was a kandra plant by Harmony is just a shattering twist. Not surprising, I suppose, since this is the realm of the gods, but man. Gonna take something significant to pull Wax out of this BSOD.

    I also noticed a subtle mention to the next book, the Bands of Mourning... which might be some kind of Feruchemical band? Hm.
  • (4/5)
    Ugh, that ending! Heart-wrenching!
  • (4/5)
    It always feels so good to read about Wax and Wayne. I love them as characters, and I love being in the world of the Mistborn. Brandon Sanderson does such a good job of creating this world that feels like home, and that just consumes you. I love how he throws in little easter eggs from the previous trilogy and how things are connected in this new alloy era. This book took a turn I wasn't expecting, but it was really good. I kind of wished we got to get to know Steris better, but maybe we'll see some more development in later books.
  • (5/5)
    This is the 5th book in the Mistborn mega saga, and extends directly from Alloy of Law. As is typical with Sanderson, the world is believable, the characters emotionally engaging, and the plot well written. However, I do feel that a couple of supporting characters were slightly imbalanced, not getting good coverage, but that's a minor nitpick. Sanderson had me guessing the entire time on who the "bad guy" was. He introduced new story elements that were not fully flushed out and that will likely be written out in more detail in upcoming books. Fantastic read.
  • (4/5)
    I like Sanderson more and more, but this isn't his strongest work (I still think the Mistborn trilogy and the conclusion of WoT are his best to date - though I admittedly haven't read every single thing he's written). More importantly, though, I'm not sure it stands on its own in the Mistborn universe as there are so many references to and reliance upon the history of the previous books. Still, if you are familiar with his universe (especially his magic system) this is well worth picking up. I also think it's an important addition to his universe, as it furthers the blend of genres Sanderson began with the original Mistborn trilogy. It's so very refreshing to find fantasy outside the typical LoTR, GoT landscape, and Sanderson's attention to detail (specifically with his magic system) with the evolution of his universe is just stunning.As a side note: The original Mistborn trilogy is still one of my most recommended books to friends and students alike.
  • (5/5)
    Good addition to the series. Wayne remains my favorite character: the way that Sanderson makes him see the world so differently is very entertaining.
  • (4/5)
    "Shadows of Self" is more of the same old Brandon Sanderson... and if you're of my opinion, that's no bad thing.Following up on the first Wax and Wayne adventure, "Alloy of Law," this newest entry actually serves as a pretty decent entry into the series for a newcomer, while offering more than sufficient content for the most dedicated follower of the tales of the Cosmere.What is most fascinating about this book to me is the way that it shows the march of progress and technology in a fantasy world. Gone are the stagnant civilizations that have persisted without change for millennia; in only a short 300+ years, the background of the story has moved from a medieval epic fantasy setting to a turn of the century, Victorian/Edwardian pastiche. The change feels organic and right, and I'm sorry that there are two more books in this time period to get through before the next big jump to, as I understand it, the 1980s.Except that will mean leaving behind Wax and Wayne, and I'm loathe to do so. In that, I'm glad we have two more of their adventures to experience. And if the Mistborn series is ever adapted into film, can I just say that while the original trilogy would make wonderful films, the adventures of Wax and Wayne would make for a gripping television series.
  • (5/5)
    I had a minor quibble with the first book of this new Mistborn trilogy, Alloy of Law, which is that we didn't get much world-building in it. We got little scraps of info that referenced the characters from the previous trilogy, and showed us a little of how the metallic arts would change life in a post-industrial world. Cool things, just not enough for me, and the world felt a little flat and hollow because of it. At least, in comparison to Sanderson's usual efforts.

    None of that here. This book goes deep. This book has so many references to the previous trilogy and the characters I love that I was getting teary eyed with nostalgia. You're damn right Vin was the blade when she fought. You tell 'em, TenSoon. Also, TenSoon! He's in it!

    Revelations about the current state of the world abound, in a similar way to Hero of Ages. Sazed isn't having the easiest time as the new god of the world it seems. Speaking of Sazed, or should I say Harmony, he makes a much bigger appearance this time around. We got a few words out of him last time when he spoke to Wax as the subtle voice of god, but this time they have a full on, pages long conversation.

    Basically, this was everything I wanted the first book to be.
  • (4/5)
    That was certainly a twisted ending.
  • (5/5)
    It did well as a stand alone book though I hear it's part of a series. It took me a while to figure out what the metal born stuff was about but subliminally it was explained well
  • (3/5)
    A mad shapeshifter plots to drive a city into chaos.3/4 (Good).There's not enough action, not enough for Wayne to do, too much politics, Theological Soul-Searching, and some long, slow stretches. I'm very much enjoying reading the series, but this is definitely a step down from the action-packed romp of "Alloy of Law."(Jun. 2022)
  • (5/5)
    Shadows of Self is great. Wav and Wayne are wonderful characters, and the industrial revolution Mistborn setting is still really good. A worthy addition to the series. Rating 5/5.
  • (5/5)
    Liked this one better than previous book in series. This book was fast-paced, and one action scene to the next. I really liked the western/steampunk vibe.
  • (3/5)
    Classic Sanderson but I didn't feel it was innovative enough. I enjoyed the return to the Elendel Basin and seeing the characters in action but I don't feel that much really happened. I'm a huge fan of Sanderson and would definitely read this book, it just didn't live up to my lofty expectations for him. That being said, this book finally opened my eyes to the Cosmere and made me very excited for the next book.
  • (3/5)
    I just don't believe that a magic system then involves pushing and pulling of metals would evolve a steampunk level of tech without magic going away. Any magic user could wreck havoc with just about any invention.

    I loved the trilogy but so far not loving these standalones. One thing I do like about them is Wayne he's great.
  • (3/5)
    This one was slower than the other mistborn books; I enjoyed the last half, but the first half was not up to his usual standards.
  • (5/5)
    The entire Wax and Wayne trilogy is a wonderful experience with deep roots in the epics. Combined with the sheer goliathan size of the cosmere you have a true and wonderful universe on your hands.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this but will admit it was pretty slow in the middle and took forever to get through.
  • (3/5)
    It was not my favorite in the series to be honest . It felt long and dragged. Let’s hope the last one is better .
  • (5/5)
    The best in the series yet, IMO. A neat blend of the older mythology with the new setting and characters. Looking forward to seeing how things round out!
  • (4/5)
    The fantasy world Sanderson creates for this series is refreshingly different. The magic system has a certain...well, not logic (it is magic, after all) but a certain kind of consistency. There are rules. The magic users can't just mumble a spell or wave a wand. This gives it the feel of a place that isn't just made up but of one that, perhaps, could be a universe with slightly different physical laws from ours. (Okay, VERY different physical laws, but sometimes you just have to suspend disbelief for the sake of the story.) But the economic similarities between the fantasy setting and the U.S.A. between the late 19th and mid 20th centuries lend a certain aspect of verisimilitude, as if a place like this could actually exist. The writing is quite good. The characters have personality, understandable motivations, and some are quite likable. Some you like a bit and hate a bit, which points out something else I appreciate. It's not always clear who the 'good guys' are. This is especially true in this fifth book of the Mistborn series. The protagonist often seems like a comic book superhero, not especially brilliant, but well-meaning as he muddles through the situations around him. It isn't until the very end that he suspects his life and the lives of everyone else are being manipulated. What he will do about this remains to be seen (in the next book?).

  • (4/5)
    I thought I would go through this book faster than I did, but then it always took me longer than expected to get through the first three books of the Mistborn trilogy. It's been a while since I read the original series; I feel like I need to go back and reread them again at some point. There were references in this book that I can't seem to remember the meaning or importance of. It's been a while since I've read the first book of this sequel series too. Luckily the third book is coming out this month, only a few months after the publication of this book, which doesn't happen very often. Anyways, Wax and Wayne are engaging characters. I didn't really get into Marasi.
  • (4/5)
    The second of the Wax and Wayne adventures in the Mistborn series. Somehow these don't quite seem to have the spark the initial trilogy had. This one has some comparative philosophy forcibly inserted into it, to further increase the stodginess. But most of the time it remains quite fun. There's a fairly significant disconnect with the first book because Sanderson was writing the Wheel of Time at the same time, and this notably changes how the story was planned out. THe Mastermind behind the last set of books whom we could reasonably have expected to have been Wax's main focus, takes a back seat as a new player is randomly introduced.Suddenly - within a few months of the previous book the city is on edge and in turmoil. Wax is called away (to his relief) from his social duties and progressing engagement to Steris, because the City Ruler's brother has been found murdered amoungst a gathering of other crime lords and less noble families. Hints of corruption in the highest places don't do well to calm the City and so Wax needs to find out what had happened. It's fairly clear some significant Metalmind had been at work.The crime and the solution all work out fairly well. I'm less keen on the random jumps in POV to another characters. Steris and Marisa get very little opportunity to progress their development instead it's all Wax rushing about and being led by the nose. Enjoyable but despite Sanderson's attempts to include some social commentary it doesn't work as well as the early ones.
  • (3/5)
    I'm finding that Brandon Sanderson joins Holly Lisle and a few others as really good writers that don't write books I really want to read. I did eventually get caught up in the story - it just took me 3/4th of the book to do it. And then the ending was a serious downer. It's a strange world - not just magic and tech mixed up with each other, but the personal attention of the gods...who are rather human in their perceptions, abilities, and understandings. Not a good thing. We got a few more bits of backstory here - new, I think, or at least I don't remember most of them from the last book. I have no idea what's going on with Wayne and the girl - how old is she? How old is Wayne? Did she know her father at all, or is all she knows that he's dead, Wayne is sorry for it, and therefore she's in a good school? Honestly - what is he trying to do, make it as bad as possible for her and for him? That whole scene made zero sense. I got some insight into some characters (particularly Marasi) from the book, but mostly people did things for reasons that were clearly important to them but completely opaque to me. I suppose I'll read the next one, but it will take me a while. It is very rich, but very murky too - not my preferred style.
  • (4/5)
    Wax and Wayne (and it wasn't until I was finished that I got the pun, shakes head); Waxillium Ladrian investigates when an assailant slaughters a crowd of corrupt people and discovers plots within plots and a lot of complicated issues, including the fact that a kandra, a being something like an angel, is behind all this and he has to hunt them, Wax, Wayne and Marasi have to save the city and possibly the world from a disaster and to stay alive throughout it all, while some of their others enemies are thinking about using this time to their advantage.
  • (4/5)
    I like these later, almost Western themed Mistborn novels. This was an easy, enjoyable read.
  • (3/5)
    I do confess that my memory is not the best, and it was 3 years since I read book 4. But that is why this book was so good. It worked splendidly as a stand alone. And note, yes this is book 5, no this is not book 5. The first 3 book is a trilogy, book 4 and 5 takes place 300 years later.

    Wax, a nobleman, and former lawman in the wild west, is trying to keep his house together and investigate what's happening in the city. To help him he has Wayne (who is weird, and good), and Marise, a cop. The investigation does not keep them all together, they are out doing their own things.

    I need to get back to that whole western comment. Yes this is fantasy, but society has evolved and they now have steam, guns and even electricity. And the outskirts are still a bit wild. And magic is still around too, but if you know Sanderson then you know his magic is always unique.

    Back to the story. There is unrest in the city, people are upset, food is scarce, and someone is trying to start a rebellion. And we can't have society burn to ash again now can we?

    Good characters, a nice story and mystery, and as always, a awesome world and magic system. At least two more books are coming, and since a thing was mentioned at the end, oh it made me so very very curious. I will just wait for the next one then.
  • (4/5)
    This is the sequel to The Alloy of Law, set 300 years after the original Mistborn trilogy. Pretty much everything you expect from Brandon Sanderson and Mistborn – fun characters, amazing magic-system innovations and worldbuilding, a very, very effective plot twist and terrible puns. I was a little disappointed that there seemed to be a lot of banter/action, and not enough character moments.
  • (5/5)
    Pros: complex mystery, great characters, more mythologyCons: didn’t touch on one of the unresolved plot points from the first bookThe past year has brought economic trouble to the city of Elendil. When a creature from mythology starts a series of terrorist attacks, targeting the governor, whom Marasi believes to be corrupt, Waxillium and Marasi become more and more convinced that these problems are related. Wax and Wayne make for a fun team. Wax is driven, with a strong moral compass while Wayne has a crude sense of humour and loose beliefs with regards to ownership. Their different abilities complement each other, making them powerful. Wayne’s ease with accents, dialects, and costumes gets a good workout. I found myself liking Steris more in this book, and wishing she had more page time. While her relationship with Wax isn’t a love match, I do think they’re a couple that could work, given how things progress. I also like how Marasi is developing as a character. She faces different kinds of challenges in this book and acquits herself well. While you don’t technically have to read Alloy of Law to understand and enjoy the events of this book, it does help. Certain events have more weight if you know what’s happened, and you’ll have a sense of missing information during a few conversations (I ended up skimming the first book half way through this one to remind myself of what’s happened). There’s also a lot more mythology in this book, making me want to read the original Mistborn trilogy.I love how Allomancy and Feruchemy work and the skills the powers allow the characters to use. This book also uses a third type of metal magic, which was cool to learn about.I was somewhat surprised that one of the major unresolved plot points from the first book wasn’t really touched on or dealt with in this one. I’m assuming it will come back in the third book.This is a fun book and while the ending isn’t a cliffhanger, it is designed to have you reaching for the next book, The Bands of Mourning, which luckily comes out in January.