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Margot

Margot

Автором Jillian Cantor

Озвучено Rachel Botchan


Margot

Автором Jillian Cantor

Озвучено Rachel Botchan

оценки:
4/5 (14 оценки)
Длина:
9 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 2014
ISBN:
9781490614823
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Anne Frank has long been a symbol of bravery and hope, but there were two sisters hidden in the annex, two young Jewish girls, one a cultural icon made famous by her published diary and the other, nearly forgotten.


In the spring of 1959, The Diary of Anne Frank has just come to the silver screen to great acclaim, and a young woman named Margie Franklin is working in Philadelphia as a secretary at a Jewish law firm. On the surface she lives a quiet life, but Margie has a secret: a life she once lived, a past and a religion she has denied, and a family and a country she left behind.
Margie Franklin is really Margot Frank, older sister of Anne, who did not die in Bergen-Belsen as reported, but who instead escaped the Nazis for America. But now, as her sister becomes a global icon, Margie' s carefully constructed American life begins to fall apart. A new relationship threatens to overtake the young love that sustained her during the war, and her past and present begin to collide. Margie is forced to come to terms with Margot, with the people she loved, and with a life swept up into the course of history.
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 1, 2014
ISBN:
9781490614823
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

Jillian Cantor is the author of award-winning and bestselling novels for adults and teens, including In Another Time, The Hours Count, Margot, and The Lost Letter, which was a USA Today bestseller. She has a BA in English from Penn State University and an MFA from the University of Arizona. Cantor lives in Arizona with her husband and two sons.


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Что люди думают о Margot

4.0
14 оценки / 11 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (3/5)
    This fictionalised novel of Anne Frank's older sister after she survived the Holocaust had parts that were quite good and others that weren't. The flashbacks were particularly interesting, but I felt that the heavy emphasis on Margot's romantic fixations on both Peter and Joshua detracted from the rest of the story. The premise was good but it didn't really deliver.
  • (4/5)
    This is really a great book. While not at all based in the actual fate of Margot Frank, the narrative is compelling beyond the initial "what if" of the premise. Margie (as she calls herself) is a sympathetic, fascinating character. A vivid portrayal of American life post-war for Jewish people.
  • (5/5)
    Seeing a slice of history from a different perspective. Made me go back and re-read Diary of a Young Girl. I completely enjoyed it.
  • (4/5)
    I hate when I have written a long thought out review and it does not load properly. Uugghh!!! Will repost when I have a chance to rewrite.

    Okay 2nd attempt to post review.

    First off I received an ARC from Shelf Awareness.

    I loved the concept of this story and although it is a work of fiction, Anne Frank really did have a sister named Margot. Unfortunately like Anne, Margot died of Typhus at Bergen-Belsen death camp during the holocaust.

    This story is what might have happened if Margot would have made it out alive or escaped during one of the two transfers. If she escaped she and Peter no longer wished to be Jewish and would become American gentiles.

    It is set in 1950's New York and she is a secretary at a Jewish law firm and she is smitten with the lawyer she works for and he likes her but he could not love or be with her because she is not Jewish. A pro bono came they start working on together begins to open up old wounds for Margot. They are working on a possible class action lawsuit for Jewish factory workers who are being mistreated by the owners of the factory who sponsored them coming to the US. All the company wants is cheap labor they care nothing for the men and women who work for them. The young man's father is one of the main partners for the law firm and he forbids his son from going forward and doing any more work on this project. But he continues on with Margot's assistance until a terrible incident occurs that send things spiraling out of control and forces Margot to face her demons.

    Can we ever really hide who we really are or where we come from?

    This would be a wonderful book for book groups so many points to discuss.
  • (3/5)
    Anne Franks sister is alive and living as a legal secretary in America.
  • (5/5)
    To quote a line from "Margot," "It's not something you can like, is it?"

    While the quote refers to a reaction of a character in "Margot" to the movie, "The Diary of Anne Frank," I felt the same way while reading about the constant fear and terror Margot lives with. The horror, the nightmares, the constant hiding of identity; these are things that Holocaust survivors lived with - even in America - but it is something, I am ashamed to say, that I never thought about before.

    The book is very well written, kept my attention, and will be on my mind for weeks to come. I will recommend this book to all my family and friends.

    I received a free copy of Margot through Goodreads Firstreads.
  • (5/5)
    What if Anne Frank's older sister actually survived the holocaust, changed her name to Margie Franklin and moved to the United States and even assumed a Christian persona to become anonymous in her new life. There are many pressures for her to reveal her past at her job at a legal office which becomes involved in a Jewish discrimination suit and also when the movie version of Diary of Anne Frank is released at theaters during the course of this novel. Ms. Cantor writes in a style that is crystal clear which is wonderful. I couldn't wait to read the book when I got a chance. This book was released as a trade paperback but really deserves to be a hard cover edition. I loved it.
  • (4/5)
    I love books that rewrite history, or those that take real characters and invent new stories for them. This is a very fine example. Margot, in Anne Frank's diary and more so in the film, was bland and studious. Cantor's version brings her from Auschwitz to a troubled life in America, where being rescued doesn't mean getting saved. The story is well told and truly believable for what might have happened. It also is true to its 1950s setting. At times, I grew impatient with Margie (Margot), but all the while understanding that there is no judging a survivor of such total terror. Very well done.
  • (4/5)
    Imagined story of Anne Frank's sister - somehow escaping, surviving, settling in America - now hiding in different way - hiding who she really is.
    Easy reading. Interesting premise, with light romance added.
  • (4/5)
    I found this book very fascinating. I've always been interested in Anne's older sister, Margot, probably since she's more like me personality-wise than Anne. But this author has taken this interesting individual and heightened her in such a magnificent way. Jillian Cantor really gets into Margot's head and brings her to vivid life.Particularly interesting to me was how Margot's past family dynamics are still shaping how she feels and act, even 14 years after the Holocaust. Her teenage romance with Peter, her mother's religiosity, Anne's gregarious nature and place in the family as the youngest, and Margot's somewhat distant relationship with her father all still have an impact on her personality and how she deals with the horrors of her past. I felt like her family were all still present in the story through her, and I really enjoyed that.The impact the Holocaust years had on Margot intrigued me. Her mind is still struggling to deal with the actions she took to survive, her years in hiding, and the very physical reminder of her painful past, her Auschwitz number tattoo. There were a few times where I felt the author put a bit too much time in Margot's psychological meanderings, and there was a certain repetition of similar themes and problems that I felt like I had to slog through at times. Yet, at the end of the day, we're exploring the mind of a young woman who went through some of the most horrific events of this past 2th century. A bit of repeated thought patterns can be excused.This book got me thinking and contemplating how the events of the Holocaust would affect someone's mind. I found it a fascinating case study of how an individual might deal with those horrors and overcome them to a degree. Then there's the added burden of having your past brandished about in movies and popular books, which I'm sure didn't help Margot's state of mind. But, this was a incredible journey that I enjoyed exploring. I was glad to see that Margot got some exploration and got her happy ending. Definitely highly recommended if you enjoy Holocaust-related fiction.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I doubt that there are too many people who haven't read A Diary of Anne Frank and not cried over the loss of Anne and her family in the concentration camps of Germany near the end of WWII. First the book and then a stage play and in 1959 a movie - the story is at the top of most people's list of books about the Holocaust. Jillian Cantor takes Anne Frank's story into 'what if' territory with her book Margot! What if....Anne's sister Margot was still alive....what if she lived in Philadelphia (the city of brotherly love) as a Christian woman called Margie....what if she was still plagued with nightmares and thoughts of her family during their last years but had never contacted her father to tell him she was alive. The novel Margot takes place in 1959 as Margot struggles with how to live her life by hiding out in plain site. She has told no one who she really is but as the movie version of Anne Frank is premiering and everyone is talking about it, she finds it more difficult to hide who she is from others but most importantly from herself. Can anyone really live a contented life by denying their history and hiding who they really are? I thought that Jillian Cantor did a fantastic job of combining real history with the 'what-ifs' of fiction to make this a truly memorable novel.

    1 person found this helpful