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Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

Написано T. Harv Eker

Озвучено Charles Constant


Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

Написано T. Harv Eker

Озвучено Charles Constant

оценки:
4.5/5 (487 оценки)
Длина:
5 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jun 14, 2016
ISBN:
9780062567345
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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Примечание редактора

Take charge…

Take charge of your financial future with this clear, informative blueprint that approaches money-saving & money-making from both a mathematical & psychological perspective.

Описание

Secrets of the Millionaire Mind reveals the missing link between wanting success and achieving it!

Have you ever wondered why some people seem to get rich easily, while others are destined for a life of financial struggle? Is the difference found in their education, intelligence, skills, timing, work habits, contacts, luck, or their choice of jobs, businesses, or investments?

The shocking answer is: None of the above!

In his groundbreaking Secrets of the Millionaire Mind, T. Harv Eker states: "Give me five minutes, and I can predict your financial future for the rest of your life!" Eker does this by identifying your "money and success blueprint." We all have a personal money blueprint ingrained in our subconscious minds, and it is this blueprint, more than anything, that will determine our financial lives. You can know everything about marketing, sales, negotiations, stocks, real estate, and the world of finance, but if your money blueprint is not set for a high level of success, you will never have a lot of money-and if somehow you do, you will most likely lose it! The good news is that now you can actually reset your money blueprint to create natural and automatic success.

Secrets of the Millionaire Mind is two books in one. Part I explains how your money blueprint works. Through Eker's rare combination of street smarts, humor, and heart, you will learn how your childhood influences have shaped your financial destiny. You will also learn how to identify your own money blueprint and "revise" it to not only create success but, more important, to keep and continually grow it.

In Part II you will be introduced to seventeen "Wealth Files," which describe exactly how rich people think and act differently than most poor and middle-class people. Each Wealth File includes action steps for you to practice in the real world in order to dramatically increase your income and accumulate wealth.

If you are not doing as well financially as you would like, you will have to change your money blueprint. Unfortunately your current money blueprint will tend to stay with you for the rest of your life, unless you identify and revise it, and that's exactly what you will do with the help of this extraordinary book. According to T. Harv Eker, it's simple. If you think like rich people think and do what rich people do, chances are you'll get rich too!

Издатель:
Издано:
Jun 14, 2016
ISBN:
9780062567345
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

КнигеКраткое содержание

Об авторе

Using the principles he teaches, T. Harv Eker went from zero to millionaire in only two and a half years, and went on to build one of the largest success training companies in North America. With his unique brand of "street smarts with heart," Eker's humorous, "cut-to-the-chase" style keeps his audience spellbound. People come from all over the world to attend his sold-out seminars, where crowds often exceed 2,000 people for a weekend program. So far, Eker's teachings have touched the lives of over a million people. Now, for the first time, he shares his proven secrets of success in this revolutionary book. Read it and grow rich!


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4.7
487 оценки / 213 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    An absolutely lovely book. I couldn't put it down. From the setting of 1900s New York, to the setting of ancient Syria and how the Jinni got caught. There is something very magical about this book that captures the beauty of being an immigrant in a new place and making ones own way in the world.
  • (4/5)
    just leave me here to cry
  • (5/5)
    I *thoroughly* enjoyed this book. It drew me in and refused to let go. A fascinating build up with a nice chewy density that wasn't too tough or flighty. I truly cared about the characters and the settings. Very well done.
  • (3/5)
    3.5
    The story is very windy and i spent a lot of time checking how far into the audio book I was. It felt like ages until the plot really got going. The Golem and Jinni were both very interesting characters surrounded by interesting people, but almost too much detail was put into their relationships. Though once the ending rolled around I felt it was all pretty well placed. I just wish the novel was paced better to allow a bit more enjoyment of it all.

    It's definitely a bit of a drag, but if you are willing to stick it out the ending is quite good!
  • (4/5)
    Oh reading this book was such a wonderfully immersive experience.

    Stories in set in New York City can sometimes ring hollow, or synthetic, or overly sentimental but this one doesn't. The direct writing allows for subtle emotion and evocation without ever overwhelming the characters that make up this story.

    And it also helps that this isn't just a New York story--it's burdened with the histories of its characters and it's livened with their cultures and communities, their islands of family and togetherness in a new world. It's a story with global roots that span seas and neighborhoods. There is a wide cast of characters but each has a purpose and each are confronted in their own way with choices that require sacrifice and come with consequences.

    It's an immigrant story, and a very good, subtle one. It's also a transformation story but one that succeeds in staying true to the very natures and histories and truths of its characters. Change comes with consequence and regret and difficulty and sometimes bloodshed, and it never comes completely. But this rings so poignantly true that the book's power is heightened by its refusal to allow any of its characters a blank slate--for who would want that?

    I look forward to the sequel; I can't wait to fall back into the wonder this author has woven
  • (5/5)
    What a treat. Totally unexpected and delightful. I would imagine audio is best, as Ifelt like I was listening to a beloved grandfather reading me a story. I don't have a beloved grandfather but if I did I would love to have this delightful fable read from this narrator. Highly recommended, especially by audio. Who would have thought? A Golem... and a Genie (jinni)??? It works !
  • (4/5)
    First of all, know that the title is very literal. The main characters in the book are the Golem and the Jinni. Beyond that, I think this is the kind of book that you shouldn't know much about before you start it, because it's difficult to explain in a way that makes it sound as good as it is.

    There are parts of this book that remind me of Michael Chabon, which is a huge compliment. And residents of NYC will enjoy the way the book is casually set there, in a way that seems perfectly natural.
  • (5/5)
    add a few ♥ ♥ ♥ as well for good measureLet's be honest (as you know I will be): I had this book when it came out, but because of all the reviews I read in one of my Shelfari Groups which were going on & on about the "literary" quality; blah, blah, blah, blah, blah; I put the book back into the book sale. I didn't read, not one review that actually told me what the book was really about, had I, I would have read it much sooner.Hence Four (4) years later, I found it again in the book sale & I have finished it in two days and I LOVE IT & Will Keep This in my Personal Library.A female Golem is made for a man as his wife. En route to New York he awakens her, but then he dies and she is free. A kindly Rabbi finds her, takes her in and names her Chava... She gets a job in a bakery; the Rabbi dies & she continues her life...In the desert of the Middle East a Djinn is entrapped in a copper flask by an evil wizard. The flask passes down from one generation to another until it reaches a tinsmith, who while repairing it releases the Djinn. The Djinn becomes Ahmed & works with the tinsmith (who is a jerk, but hey) increasing the tinsmith's business & his bank accountThe Djinn & Golem meet and become "friends"... they have their nocturnal adventures through New York and are working through their relationship when the maker of the Golem arrives in New York & attempts to take control of her.This is "Golem:Jinni For Dummies" The book was rich with legend, history and romantic, Bedouin, Jewish, Syrian, Ghetto (not like slums but melting-pot neighborhood), & privileged life.The pace was actually fast, the relationships well thought out, the writing redolent of heady "Arabian" & fantastical nights, survival, the nature of the mystical, & the etheric qualitative beauty of mystical love.I'm ready to read it again..... Now I understand there is a sequel, but I am not ready for that, as I usually find sequels disappointing.....
  • (5/5)
    What a wonderful book! It is extremely well written, and it seems that it was researched thoroughly. The story takes place in 1899 New York in two distinct neighborhoods: Syrian and Jewish. I was not that familiar with the mythology of the jinni before reading this, and I had never heard of a golem before. Wecker does a great job of giving these characters interesting backstories and believable personalities. I especially loved Chava and could relate to her in a lot of ways.It takes quite a few pages for the jinni and the golem to finally meet one another, but it doesn't feel like a long time because Wecker's descriptions of the scenery and the time and other character's backstories are so interesting.I especially love how Wecker compared the differing personalities of the golem and the jinni and exposed how they are similar in very human ways. While doing this, she brings up some intriguing insights into human psychology, religion, and philosophy without being heavy handed.The author is great at intertwining all of the characters stories together into one amazing story- everyone from the main characters to the little boy down the road to the ice cream vendor to the director of a Jewish boarding house.I read this for book club and I probably wouldn't have chosen it on my own, but I am so glad that I read it! I would strongly recommend this to anyone interested in mythological fiction, historical fiction, or literary fiction.
  • (2/5)
    I gave this book 100 pages and I just couldn't stick with it. It's not that it wasn't good, there just wasn't much action. The first couple of chapters were great. They introduced both of the main characters and told how they got to America. Then there's all this background story and all kinds of other characters that don't seem very important show up with tons of history... It felt really laggy. Maybe I'll pick it back up somewhere down the line, but for now, not interested.
  • (5/5)
    So if you're the kind of person who doesn't really get into fantasy, but likes a touch of magic in your stories, this is the book for you. From the title you can guess that the two main characters are a Golem and a Jinni, but the story takes place mostly in New York in 1899. It's so original, but also accessible it really seems like it's destined to be a classic and I would love to see a movie made from it. It has romance, tragedy, and the setting is perfect. I really cared about the characters and wanted them to succeed. It probably helped that the narrator was George Guidell, he's not my favorite narrator, but when I hear his voice it reminds me of many audiobooks I listened to 20+ years ago.
  • (5/5)
    This took me a lot longer to read than I would've liked, partly due to the smallish text (maybe I should've read it on my Kindle), but toward the end, partly because I didn't want to say goodbye to these characters. I read a sequel is coming in the fall, but this book has a perfect ending and while I welcome the chance to read more about Chava the Golem and Ahmad the Jinni, I would have been happy enough with just this.Chava is a Hebrew creature made of clay to be the wife of a man who dies en route from Prussia to New York City in 1899. An elderly rabbi realizes her true nature and takes her under his wing, trying to teach her how to fit in. Ahmad (his real name is unpronounceable) is a jinni released from a flask by a Syrian metalsmith after years of captivity. Still trapped by the iron cuff on his wrist, put there by the wizard who had imprisoned him, the newly-named Ahmad is stuck in human form. Wecker makes full use of their opposing natures as the two non-human creatures happen upon each other one night and form an odd friendship. Chava has been left masterless yet privy to the thoughts of all humans she comes in contact with. Needing neither sleep nor food or drink, possessing no beating heart, she is under constant stress of being found out. A being of superior strength, she poses a danger to society and she can be destroyed by the reading of a particular spell. Freed from a master's control though by nature she was made for such control, Chava struggles to find her place in the city she finds herself in.On the other hand, Ahmad is a creature born to soar and the constraints of human form and the need to also fit into society, are as chafing to his nature as the cuff on his wrist.Dangers come from all directions, including the arrival of the elderly mystic who created Chava who is seeking eternal life, the bewitched man who senses Ahmad's true nature, and instances where both Chava and Ahmad inadvertently reveal their special abilities. Wecker does a wonderful job weaving together the disparate characters and events, including flashbacks, to give us a fully realized, fantastical New York City at the end of the 1800s. Along the way, she gives us a treatise on what it means to be human, as well as an unexpected love story.
  • (4/5)
    It's really not fair to compare this book to The Night Circus, as we are only ever as we are made, no more, no less.
  • (4/5)
    Loved it. Interesting, historical, easy to read, fantasy, religion, this has it all! More please!
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful book.
  • (5/5)
    A Jewish female golem, a creature of clay, was created to be her master's wife, who was immigrating to 1899 America. When he dies during the voyage, the golem is overwhelmed by the surrounding thoughts that flood her consciousness. During the same time, a jinni, a citizen of the desert and creature of fire, is released from a metal flask in Little Syria, NYC, only to discoverer that he has no memory of how he got into the container and a unremovable metal bracelet preventing him to assume no shape but a human. Both supernatural creatures are befriended by older lonely men, a rabbi and a tinsmith, who take pity on the creatures and help them in their assimilation in the surrounding communities. Then one night, the two of them meet, each creature seeing the other for what they really are.

    Although this author's debut novel possesses fantastical elements, this is not the primary focus of this historical novel. It is actually about two outsiders attempting to discover what it means to be human and to create a new world for themselves. A story that holds you from cover to cover, it is one of my new favorites. I look forward to reading other novels by this author.
  • (4/5)
    Although it was a little slow to start and I have to admit I got a tad bored at times, this book was just fantastic! I absolutely loved the folklore, the characters (the Golem and the Jinni were so badass, I loved them both for totally different reasons), the settings, the different cultures, the writing, it was all impeccably done. And add onto that the multiple perspectives and storylines that were woven together and DING DING DING, we have a winner!

    This would've definitely been a 5 star book were it not for the slow start in those first 150 pages or so. I don't really mind slow paced books that much but the beginning of this one made me a bit antsy, particularly due to the lack of plot. Sure, things were happening, but they weren't all that exciting. (In hindsight, all of the exposition was really important in setting up the story but I still feel like it could've been executed better). Regardless, I'm very happy I pushed myself because it was so worth it.

    I would definitely recommend The Golem and the Jinni but please, go into with one thing in mind: be patient. It might seem boring and overdrawn at first but trust me, when it all comes together in the end your mind will be blown (ALL THE PLOT TWISTS I TELL YOU!).
  • (1/5)
    Tiptree shortlist 2013. Got almost a quarter of the way through and nothing remotely interesting had happened - neither was there anything that might be interpreted as an examination of gender. I gave up.
  • (5/5)
    A magical novel. A female golem is awakened on her passage to American only to have her master die en route. She meets a rabbi who is trying to teach her to person. A bound genie has been freed accidentally and takes an apprenticeship with a tinsmith until he can figure out how to break his binding. The golem and the genie meet and become tentative friends.
  • (5/5)
    What a wonderful story! Good vs. evil. Historical. Cultural. I rooted for all of the characters, except the old man who created the golem.
  • (4/5)
    The Golem and the Jinni tells the long, rather drawn out story of the unusual relationship between two otherworldly beings. Chava is a female golem, a figure from Jewish folklore. Made of clay, she is supernaturally strong, but created to be submissive to a master's will. Her companion is Ahmad, a jinni imported from the Arab storytelling tradition. Freed from his centuries-long imprisonment in a flask, Ahmad is made from fire, and, as befits his nature, he's impetuous and passionate. Through various twists of fate, both of these fabled creatures find themselves living among humans in turn-of-the-century New York City. Their interactions with people ultimately beget violence and sorrow. I found this novel intriguing, but also dark and almost cheerless, lightened only by the golem's and the jinni's touching devotion to each other. I would have liked it better had there been less of it.
  • (4/5)
    Great read.
  • (3/5)
    Golems! Jinni! Rabbi wizards!
  • (5/5)
    Seriously impressed with this book! I think the ending could've been better, but the storytelling here was captivating.
  • (5/5)
    LOVED IT!! LOVED IT!! LOVED IT!!
  • (5/5)
    What a wonderful book! It is extremely well written, and it seems that it was researched thoroughly. The story takes place in 1899 New York in two distinct neighborhoods: Syrian and Jewish. I was not that familiar with the mythology of the jinni before reading this, and I had never heard of a golem before. Wecker does a great job of giving these characters interesting backstories and believable personalities. I especially loved Chava and could relate to her in a lot of ways.It takes quite a few pages for the jinni and the golem to finally meet one another, but it doesn't feel like a long time because Wecker's descriptions of the scenery and the time and other character's backstories are so interesting.I especially love how Wecker compared the differing personalities of the golem and the jinni and exposed how they are similar in very human ways. While doing this, she brings up some intriguing insights into human psychology, religion, and philosophy without being heavy handed.The author is great at intertwining all of the characters stories together into one amazing story- everyone from the main characters to the little boy down the road to the ice cream vendor to the director of a Jewish boarding house.I read this for book club and I probably wouldn't have chosen it on my own, but I am so glad that I read it! I would strongly recommend this to anyone interested in mythological fiction, historical fiction, or literary fiction.
  • (4/5)
    This fantasy should appeal to people who don't like fantasy. The unlikely story is a good read.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. I was engrossed from page one and I loved the premise. I felt that all the characters were very deep and complex. I even enjoyed the villain, perhaps because of the long history Wecker gave him. I loved the interactions between the golem and the jinni and how differently they viewed humans. As their relationship developed over time they began to change each other's views on humanity and life. I enjoyed how the jinni's past slowly unfolded throughout the story and built up to the main conflict. And of course the cover is beautiful and I love the rough edges of the pages. I think everyone should give this book a chance.
  • (4/5)
    Rating: 4 of 5The Golem and the Jinni did not sweep me off my feet immediately. It took 120-130 pages before I was completely engrossed. After that, well, it was a good thing I didn't own a golem: lest anyone or anything that interrupt my reading suffer its wrath. Seriously, though, this was one of those books where I read right up till the last possible minute - to take dinner off the stove, to sign into work, to leave the house for whatever errand, or even to go to the bathroom.I loved the blending of Jewish and Arab folklore, both of which I knew only a little.I loved that it could be read as a love story, but it did so without all the melodramatic romance, lovey dovey crap that annoys me about most "love stories."I loved the exploration of what it means to be human.And I loved the ending, which was equal parts bitter and sweet.It was fiction at its best, doing exactly what I think great fiction is meant to do, which can be taken at face value and enjoyed purely as fantastic storytelling, but can also go deeper ... much deeper if the reader were so inclined and wished to engage in its philosophical questions.
  • (4/5)
    I heard a great deal of acclaim regarding this book last year, but more than that, it sounded relevant to my interests. I love historical fiction--even more if it has fantastic elements--and I am intrigued by golems. I was happy when this ebook went on sale a few weeks ago, and even happier when it made the Nebula shortlist--that meant this was a top priority for me to read by the end of March. Yay.It reads like historical fiction--the voice is very straightforward, the view point varying between several characters. Sometimes I felt like the viewpoints gave away almost too much. Wecker does a fabulous job of creating sympathetic characters. The golem is made to be a man's wife--made to be a willing slave, designed to please in all things--though things fall apart (for the better, in her case) and she is free in New York City. The jinni is likewise bound, but he has no idea who his master was. He is released in New York City after centuries of confinement, with no memory of how he was confined. He is a bit of a cad--normally a turn-off for me--but he is not a bad fellow, truly. As a powerful entity, he's ignorant of the consequences he has on more fragile humans (in contrast to the golem, who feels the profound urge to please in all things).I could see some people being irritated by their characters as really exploiting male and female stereotypes, but I didn't feel that way. To me, they each made sense and felt very real.Wecker's research is astonishing. New York City at the turn of the 20th century is a compelling and grim place of immigrants and squalor. This is one of those books that is both entertaining and enlightening in regards to history; I also loved the additional historical notes at the back, things she couldn't fit into the book, like how Jewish bakers often sold their bakeries for the week of Passover, and how most Syrian immigrants at that point were Christian.It's a solid book. Not perfect, but enjoyable. I've read only two of the eight books on the Nebula shortlist, and so far this is my favorite.