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I'll See You in Paris: A Novel

I'll See You in Paris: A Novel

Написано Michelle Gable

Озвучено Tanya Eby


I'll See You in Paris: A Novel

Написано Michelle Gable

Озвучено Tanya Eby

оценки:
3/5 (10 оценки)
Длина:
11 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 9, 2016
ISBN:
9781511300896
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Three women, born generations apart.
One mysterious book that threads their lives together.
A journey of love, discovery, and truth…

I'll See You in Paris is based on the real life of Gladys Spencer-Churchill, the Duchess of Marlborough, a woman whose life was so rich and storied it could fill several books. Nearly a century after Gladys's heyday, a young woman's quest to understand the legendary Duchess takes her from a charming hamlet in the English countryside, to a dilapidated manse kept behind barbed wire, and ultimately to Paris, where answers will be found at last. In the end, she not only solves the riddle of the Duchess, but uncovers the missing pieces in her own life.

At once a great love story and literary mystery, I'll See You in Paris will entertain and delight, with an unexpected ending that will leave readers satisfied and eager for Gable's next novel.

Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 9, 2016
ISBN:
9781511300896
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

New York Times bestselling author of A Paris Apartment, MICHELLE GABLE graduated from The College of William & Mary. When not dreaming up fiction on the sly, she currently resides in Cardiff by the Sea, California, with her husband, two daughters, and one lazy cat.

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3.0
10 оценки / 9 Обзоры
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  • (4/5)
    What was the intrigue and what was the secret about the book Annie always wanted to read but never did? Why was her mother so evasive about that book, The Missing Duchess, and who was the Duchess of Marlborough?Why did she and her mother really go to London?Would the book and their trip to London reveal secrets in Annie's life?We follow Annie in present day and Pru, Win, and The Duchess (Mrs. Spencer) in the not so distant past.Annie meets a British citizen who knew The Duchess, Pru, and Win. Pru is the caregiver for the feisty Duchess. Win is the author who wrote the book about The Duchess who claims she really isn't a Duchess. Getting the story for his book was difficult for Win because The Duchess kept her life under wraps.Annie gets the low down about all three characters from a British citizen, Gus, and she also trespasses into the house The Duchess lived in. I enjoyed Annie's trips into the the house. I always love finding secrets and finding treasures from the past.I enjoyed the back and forth in time and the "real time" story from Pru, The Duchess, and Win.The characters in I'LL SEE YOU IN PARIS were quirky and fun. I loved The Duchess...she was a character. I like this quote that was inside the book:"Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom." Marcel ProustI'LL SEE YOU IN PARIS was very light and enjoyable with memorable characters and was well researched. I love the cover and the revelations at the end. I do have to say the book was a bit confusing at times, but it is oh so good and so very creative. ENJOY!! 4/5This book was given to me free of charge and without compensation by the publisher in return for an honest review.
  • (3/5)
    Early chapters of this promising book yield too many coincidences: the books Annie just happens to see her mother holding in the middle of the night when they just happen to both be awake which turns out to be a story about the village where they are flying to - and where Annie just happens to take the book to a pub to read and a guy just happens to know the author and LadyMarlborough.Annie then tells a bunch of useless dumb lies while her mother holds tight to her own mysteries - and the point being...?Dropping the Diet Coke had me wishing the book had already ended.Plot picked up a bit when Gus and Win get rolling.But the filth! Why wasn't there a ton of diseases?Worse still, none of the characters was that believable or appealing.
  • (5/5)
    Thanks to NetGalley who provided the book in return for an unbiased review.I will start off this review where I usually end my reviews -- this is a great book and you need to read it! The author does a fantastic job with her main characters and with a story line that keeps you guessing until the very end. I thought that I had it figured out about 3/4 of the way through but I was way off. Its a page turner that is part mystery, part love story with some laughs in between. The main characters are Annie, a recent college graduate, just engaged to Eric who is deployed to the Middle East and doesn't seem to know quite what to do with her life; her Mom Laurel, a very straight laced lawyer who also teaches horse back riding to handicapped students and Gladys Spencer-Churchill who may or may not be the Duchess of Marlborough. The story takes place in the early 70s, in 2001 and in the late 1800s. As difficult as it may sound to weave those time periods together and women together, the author does a fantastic job of doing just that in a very entertaining way. The main setting of the book is not Paris as the title would have you believe but a run down estate in England but Paris plays a very large role in the ultimate outcome of the story. There is so much more that I could say about this novel but I don't want to give anything away so I will just say again - its a terrific book and you're going to love it!
  • (2/5)
    A straightforward biography of Gladys Deacon, the Duchess of Marlborough, would have been more interesting. I thought the same about Marthe de Florian, the subject of the author's previous book, A Paris Apartment. I did not like the back-and-forth timelines, and could not become interested in the characters. I can't be enthusiastic about this book, as most other reviewers are here. I didn't like it and I didn't finish it.
  • (1/5)
    Not my cup of tea
  • (3/5)
    One of my all-time favorite books is Michelle Gable’s debut novel, A Paris Apartment. I loved that story; if memory serves me correctly, I read it in three evenings. So naturally I was excited when Gable’s second novel, I’ll See You in Paris, was released. I purposely waited a while to read it as I was afraid that if it wasn’t as good as the first one, I would be horribly disappointed. I’m glad I waited. I’ll See you in Paris is not as good and at times was a difficult read.Like A Paris Apartment, I’ll See in Paris has dualing timelines with the narrative weaving between 2001 and 1973. One of the biggest issues I have with this book is that the 1973 sections felt more like 1930s or ‘40s. It just seemed like the timeframe was off.The story has four main heroines. First there is Annie. She’s gotten herself engaged to a young man she barely knows who has joined the Army and is headed off to Afghanistan shortly after 9/11. Her mother, Laurel, is less-than enthusiastic about this development. Laurel is our second heroine.Laurel and Annie are about to leave for the English countryside to settle some business that Annie doesn’t really understand, but the reads figure it out pretty quickly. Right before their departure, Annie discovers a book her mother seems to be interested in, yet the only thing Laurel reads is legal briefs.Then the story shifts to our third heroine, Pru Valentine. She is in desperate need of employment and answers a want ad. There in the English countryside, Pru becomes a companion/assistant to an eccentric woman in her early nineties, our fourth heroine, who has a penchant for running around waving a gun and not wearing a blouse.This would seem too far-fetched if the woman wasn’t the real-life Gladys Deacon Spencer-Churchill. There is a mystery surrounding Gladys. Is she the Duchess of Marlboro who disappeared forty years earlier? It was that mystery that kept me reading, and the one that I didn’t figure out so easily. Gladys felt like a caricature to me.The main theme of the novel seems to be people are probably not who you think they are. And that is certainly true for the protagonists in this tale.Although reading this review, it doesn’t sound like I cared for this work. I admit, again that I was disappointed that it was an excellent as A Paris Apartment. I’ll See You in Paris receives 3 out of 5 stars in Julie’s world.
  • (5/5)
    A special thank you to St. Martin's Press/ Thomas Dunne and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Michelle Gable returns following her smashing debut, A Paris Apartment, where we met two unforgettable women, with I’LL SEE YOU IN PARIS, she again blends, beautifully fact and fiction with two time periods, for an unforgettable journey! Based on a true story, weaving together the life of Gladys Deacon, the Duchess of Marlborough with tales of two women: A young woman (Pru) who’s just lost her fiancé in the Vietnam War in the 1970s, and a recent college graduate (Annie) living in Virginia shortly after 9/11 in 2001.Nineteen-year-old Laurel Haley takes a job in England, after losing her fiancé in the Vietnam War. Later she meets a man and they go to Paris. Thirty years later, (as the book opens) in Middleburg, Virginia, Laurel’s daughter Annie is engaged to Eric, and he is going off to war. Her mother is concerned about this arrangement. Annie is questioning her father, grandparents, aunts and uncles. As far as Annie knew their family tree was mostly barren, woefully branchless. She did not have siblings, and neither did her mom. What about her dad’s tree?Mother and daughter are off to England to take care of some business, for Laurel’s retirement (an inheritance), which of course Annie knew nothing of. Her mom does not seem to be very forthcoming with answers. Prior to leaving, Annie discovers a mysterious box of documents, and an ancient blue book. The Missing Duchess. A mysterious book and Annie’s quest to understand. Off to the Banbury Inn, Oxfordshire England. What in the heck? Did her mom have a secret past? She is so secretive and vague. Gladys Marie Spencer-Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough (1881–1977), was an American socialite. She was the mistress and later the second wife of Charles Spencer-Churchill, 9th Duke of Marlborough. Born to a wealthy Newport family, the dazzling Miss Deacon though privileged, no one would accuse her of being sheltered.• By age ten Gladys Deacon had lived in four different countries.•At eleven she was placed in the custody of a convicted murderer.•She was kidnapped at twelve and in the middle of a worldwide murder scandal. •At fourteen, she declared her love for the Duke of Marlborough, her future husband•At sixteen she debuted in London where she met her future husband, who was already married.•By twenty she was living independently in Paris, in an apartment she owned alone. In 1906, at the age of twenty-five, Gladys cemented her friendship with Marcel Proust, which led to friendships with the most eminent writers of the era: Hardy, Wharton, Waugh. And of course Henry James. The men, the lovers, a pending marriage fell apart. What happened to the duchess? Did she vanish?Her husband died, and she disappeared from her palace in the 1930s and turns up in the English countryside in the 1970s.Back to Laurel and Annie: When they get to England, Laurel gets busy with sorting out her affairs, and leaves Annie time to read, and explore into the life of the mysterious Gladys Deacon. While reading she meets Gus, an older guy in a nearby pub. He seems to know a lot of history. She soon learns the lady in question, was a hot topic; one with spooky blue eyes who ran round Banbury helter-skelter, shooting guns and shouting obscenities. She called herself Mrs. Spencer. “The dens of the mad often hold the greatest riches.” The best part— Gus tells the story from Newport, a decade before Annie was born. Pru, nineteen, a bookish girl who left university after a year to get married. When she learned there would be no marriage, (Charlie died in Vietnam), she sees an ad White Collar Girl Needed in Oxfordshire, England as a personal assistant for a cultured older woman with the requirements: love literature and the English countryside—salary plus free board. She was hired. The perfect gal for the job. Let the fun begin at the Grange. (a run-down monstrosity). The eccentric old lady had been living independently at ninety-plus years. A recluse. (love her) Tom a displaced Polish man, a handyman in the barn. Win Seton is a writer who is convinced Mrs. Spencer is Marlborough, attempting to write a story. Flashing back and forth Annie digs deeper into the background to learn more about the fascinating Duchess of Marlborough’s past. Quite interesting and scandalous. . .Soon Anna learns the connection ---to her own past, and the journey finally gets to magical Paris, with an adventurous side tour. From witty, mysterious, quirky, charming, and intriguing-- infused with rich history and literary sparks from the endless collection of the eccentric duchess quotes. I love mysteries and hidden dark family secrets. I’ve always wondered what secrets my parents or grandparents have in their past. Historical fans will delight--and those intrigued by the intelligent woman who inspired this lovely tale. Gable sticks closely to the real facts and takes liberties where needed with some pleasant surprises. The author recommends further reading and references if you want to know more about the most beautiful and tempestuous woman. Well-researched, complex and moving…A nice mother-daughter relationship. Beautiful settings, and a stunning cover-- once again. Gable’s passion shines through the pages, as the characters come alive for an engaging read! Fans of Kate Morton’s The Lake House and Beatriz Williams will enjoy. If you have not read, A Paris Apartment, highly recommend. (Still on the top bestseller list).
  • (1/5)
    I’ll See You in Paris by Michelle Gable starts in 2001 in Virginia. Laurel Haley is a going to Banbury, England to sell a home she owns (her daughter did not even know she owned a home in England). Her daughter, Annabelle aka Annie is going with her. Laurel has always refused to discuss her past with Annie. Nor will she discuss Annie’s biological father. Before they leave for the airport, Annie notices an old, blue book of her mothers. Annie picks it up and brings it along with her (but lies to everyone about it). When Annie goes to a pub, an older gentleman, Gus who recognizes the book. Annie gets information from him and also does a little investigating (and trespassing). Annie slowly unravels the mystery as well as her mother’s past (it was an odd book).I'll See You in Paris is an extremely difficult book to read. It is written in a confusing format that makes the reader want to give up by the end of the third chapter (this is where I wanted to chuck the book across the room). I just did not like the story or the characters. The novel does contain foul language (and it was not needed). The only thing I liked about I'll See You in Paris is the cover (which is what attracted me to the book). It is only in the last twenty percent of the book does the story start to come together. However, the ending was disappointing. I give I’ll See You in Paris 1 out of 5 stars.I received a complimentary copy of I’ll See You in Paris from NetGalley in exchange for an honest evaluation of the book!
  • (3/5)
    The story of Laurel and her daughter Annabelle didn’t grab me too much at first. Laurel is absent for most of the present day storyline, set in 2001. The old book Annabelle discovers and the story she learns in England was much more enticing. This narrative, set in 1973 starring Pru, Win and Mrs. Spencer (could she be the Duchess?) and the story of the Duchess of Marlborough herself (which is set back in the gilded age earlier in the century) was much more compelling and page turning. Although the story quickly became pretty transparent, I was curious enough to be rewarded with a fairly good ending.