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The Imperial Wife: A Novel

The Imperial Wife: A Novel

Написано Irina Reyn

Озвучено Karen Peakes


The Imperial Wife: A Novel

Написано Irina Reyn

Озвучено Karen Peakes

оценки:
4/5 (6 оценки)
Длина:
10 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jul 19, 2016
ISBN:
9781511385503
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

The Imperial Wife follows the lives of two women, one in contemporary New York City and the other in eighteenth-century Russia.

Tanya Kagan, a specialist in Russian art at a top New York auction house, is trying to entice Russia's wealthy oligarchs to bid on the biggest sale of her career, The Order of Saint Catherine, while making sense of the sudden and unexplained departure of her husband.

As questions arise over the provenance of the Order and auction fever kicks in, Reyn takes us into the world of Catherine the Great, the infamous 18th-century woman who may have owned the priceless artifact, and who it turns out faced many of the same issues Tanya wrestles with in her own life.

The Imperial Wife asks what female ambition means, today and in the past, and whether a marriage can withstand an ambitious wife.

Издатель:
Издано:
Jul 19, 2016
ISBN:
9781511385503
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Irina Reyn is a fiction and nonfiction writer who divides her time between Pittsburgh and Brooklyn. Her work has appeared in anthologies and publications such as The Forward, San Francisco Chronicle, The Moscow Times, Nextbook and Post Road. Born in Moscow, Irina was raised in Fair Lawn, New Jersey.

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3.8
6 оценки / 5 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    One of the most rewarding novels in a long while. The hero is a woman specialist in Russian art at a leading Manhattan auction house. An object connected with the Russian Empress Catherine the Great is up for bids: it is a highly desirable piece and interest among the super wealthy of Moscow is quite high. The locale shifts from New York to Monaco to Moscow, and back in time to that moment when the actual Catherine received the item now up for sale. There is plenty of palace intrigue--matched by contemporary tales including an extended theme on what it means to be an immigrant (and also: the ups and downs of marriage and family). This book is like a glass of great champagne; it goes down quickly, is delicious, and is unforgettable.
  • (1/5)
    I never like to give up on a book, I like to complete it to the end. This book was painful. The author is too focused on over describing everything, to get down to real story telling.
    Anti-climactic beginning with an anti-climatic ending.
    I’m not a feminist, but this book showed no strength of character in Tonya, and I felt sorry for her.
    Huge disappointment, it’s unfortunate that I paid for it.
  • (4/5)
    I received this book for free through Bookstr’s (formerly The Reading Room) giveaways. I liked this but I wasn’t in love with it. I really liked the historical aspects of it. It was fun learning more about Catherine the Great since I knew very little about her. The way her story was told reminded me of how Mary Queen of Scots’s story was told on the show Reign. The present day story, on the other hand, was good but it wasn’t satisfactory. It was missing that spark to make it truly remarkable. One thing I did like about the present day story was how it touched upon the immigrant experience.Overall, I thought this was a solid book especially if you are interested in learning more about Russian history.
  • (3/5)
    There were things that really worked for me in this book, and things that didn’t work as well. Not so great things first: The book is structured as a dual narrative; that isn’t the issue. For me, I had a difficult time reconciling the two narratives - there wasn’t an intersection between the two, rather I felt as though I was reading two completely different books that were smashed together. I also wished I could’ve developed a deeper connection with both Catherine and Tanya - I couldn’t seem to get past feeling as though I were watching from a million miles away. It was “oh, I’m reading a book about them, and it’s a pleasant experience”, rather than being inside their head, experiencing every thought and feeling. All that said, I enjoyed the book overall and it was my introduction to the female rulers of Russia. I was very intrigued by Catherine and plan to read more about her. Why I gave it three stars: this is one of the few books I’ve read with not one, but two, ambitious female lead characters that I could actually relate to. I’m a working professional and my husband and I see each other as equals, but there are times when I question whether or not I’m prioritizing my career at the sacrifice of our relationship etc. It was refreshing to have those insecurities acknowledged. As I was reading, I highlighted several passages that really spoke to me and I thought it was well written. My favorite quote: “…when did I ever enjoy the process of becoming? When would I finally be satisfied with what I’ve achieved? At each juncture, there was always more to want. More ways to be the most competent person in the room.” - pg 58Overall, I wouldn’t rush out into the streets telling strangers that they must read this book. But it’s certainly worth a look, and I would definitely consider reading something else by the same author. Thanks to Thomas Dunne Books and St Martin’s Press (via Netgalley) for granting permission to read the galley copy.
  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Good, but not spectacular pretty much sums up this book. I appreciated the movement between past and present as the two storylines converged. I found Tanya's present-day tale much more compelling than the 18th-century one of Catherine the Great - perhaps because I already knew how that one ended? Overall, this is a good, solid read for anyone with an interest in Catherine the Great.

    1 person found this helpful