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More Than This

More Than This

Написано Jay McLean

Озвучено Jeremy York и Allison Lynnewood


More Than This

Написано Jay McLean

Озвучено Jeremy York и Allison Lynnewood

оценки:
3.5/5 (23 оценки)
Длина:
7 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 13, 2015
ISBN:
9781501212369
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

When Mikayla imagined her prom night, she envisioned a fairy-tale evening full of romance. So when betrayal and tragedy come in quick succession, Mikayla is completely destroyed. Suddenly, everything she loved and everyone she relied on are tragically, irrevocably gone.

Jake, a handsome boy she just met, happens to witness her loss. With no one to turn to, Mikayla is forced to depend on this near stranger and his family, and he in turn is determined to take care of her. But Mikayla-thrust into adulthood with no one to guide her-is desperate to contain her grief and hide what she considers to be her weakness. Mikayla and Jake both want more, but despite their growing closeness and intense chemistry, she tries to keep her distance and protect her heart. As he does everything in his power to win her trust, Mikayla must choose between remaining alone and safe or letting love in.

Издатель:
Издано:
Jan 13, 2015
ISBN:
9781501212369
Формат:
Аудиокнига


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3.7
23 оценки / 40 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    Intense sci-fi/fantasy tale of boy who dies ... but doesn't . Seth drowns (violent, first-hand account) and then re-awakens in his childhood home. He thinks he is the Last Man on the Planet but later discovers others (Tomacz, Regine) who seem to share his fate. They are pursued by a "the Driver" -- encased in a dark, menacing car. This riveting, engaging book is a deep look at life and death and the boundaries between as well as the nature of love (There is a subtheme detailing Seth's romantic relationship with another boy, Gudmund.) The main audience for this book, adolescent males, may be put off by this but it is tastefully handled. The action is tempered by philosophic musings, but the voice and descriptions are, as usual with Ness, terrific. The half point is because this reader lost interest towards the end -- not such a big fan of fantasy.
  • (4/5)
    I have no idea what just happened.
  • (4/5)
    A little matrix like, a little dystopian, very Ness.
  • (4/5)
    He wakes up in a world he used to know, many years before. His old street- his old house, where he lived before the unspeakable tragedy. But there is no life here now. No people, no animals, and no evidence of either. Everything is covered in a layer of dust, and the evidence that time has passed. Has it been months? Years? If you loved The Knife of Never Letting Go, and the Chaos Walking Trilogy, you will recognize some of the most exciting characteristics of those novels in More than This. Parick Ness write books that keep you guessing about what will happen next, and question what you know to be true
  • (3/5)
    The writing was ok, certainly well edited, but awfully vague and boring for the first 50 pages. After a while being mysterious about who the only character introduced so far is, with constant but vague hints that there is a story, but that the author isn't going to tell it just yet, tamp down whatever excitement and interest the reader might otherwise have felt while reading about the character's strange 'post'-death experiences. I was grateful that at least the book was not full of angsty teen dialogue that very few teenaage boys (and not many girls) I've ever known would be caught uttering, even under their breath; there were a few pages of this, of course, because as a YA novel, how could it not throw in just a dose of the angsty stuff. But it could have been much worse.

    What really dropped the star rating on this book for me (from a 4; the vague non-storytelling bits already bugged me too much for a 5) was the ending. I won't ruin it for those who have the intention still of reading this book, but it was disappointing. I understand that he is just a 17yr-old kid, and he's not expected to grasp the difference between real friends and imaginary ones yet, but seriously? There may have been ways of making the choice at the end of this story seem right, for him or for anyone else, but this novel didn't convince me. I seriously doubt that the human race has much of a future left with this kid in it, at least the portion of the human race he is plugged into.
  • (2/5)
    So disappointed in this book! The cover design, introduction and recommendations seemed super promising but the book itself really didn't do much for me. Up till page 172 it's very calm and much the same and I had to push myself to keep reading. Then suddenly something big happens and the whole feeling of the story changes - thats cool! But after that it kinds of just keeps going back and forth between the boring part and the super extreme part, which I think could have been done with more profundity in between. The idea of a plot like this is great. But I feel like Patrick Ness has chosen the easy way out. No explanation, for none of those different parts of the story, quite predictable at a lot of moments, plus an open ending which left me feeling pretty bland about it all. So sorry, but pretty unsatisfactory... Maybe the target audience is just really much younger than me. I normally love reading YA books but this might just not been the right pick!
  • (4/5)
    I have recently discovered Patrick Ness and I think he is a fantastic writer. I have read Chaos Walking and A Monster Calls which I thought were fabulous. I didn't like "More than this" quite so much but it was still a very enjoyable read with an interesting plot and a central character who's mental confusion you are dragged into. Ness is not afraid of real life themes and it's all the better for it.
  • (1/5)
    i read quite a lot of it, maybe half but i just didn't enjoy it
  • (3/5)
    A story with an interesting premise and good characters. But it seemed to take ages to move through the plot. I feel like it needed a damn good edit and could have been 100 pages shorter.
  • (4/5)
    'Here is the boy, drowning' begins the new novel by Patrick Ness, and the boy who is to be the hero of the novel does indeed drown. Or perhaps it would be more correct to say he is killed instead by the massive injuries he recieves as the waves smash him into the rocks just as he is about to drown anyway. Either way by the end of the first chapter he is well and truly dead. So it's surprising to find that by the middle of the second chapter the boy (Seth) wakes up to find himself lying on a concrete path leading to the front door of a house. And seemingly not dead at all, which he is as surprised about as the reader. And he is not in the coastal Californian town where he has spent his teenage years, he is in a street that is clearly English, and outside the house that he has not seen since he was eight years old when his parents emigrated. But it's not a happy homecoming: there are clearly memories buried in that house which are best left undisturbed, something to do with his brother which he can't remember clearly. And the England in which he finds himself is very different to the one he remembers: empty of people and clearly abandoned, and with everything just left. Even the climate has changed. So is this his own personal hell or something else entirely?This was an enjoyable an thought provoking read: one of those where you're never entirely sure if you know what is going on. There was one point where I thought 'Oh no, it's (insert name of well known film) all over again, but it didn't turn out quite like that. So recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Ness has done it again. It should not surprise me, but it is still something that brings awe. The writing is brilliant, the characters are bloody good, and the plot... Well, if you are going to have issues with the book, you'll most likely have them with the plot.The story is bleak. It's never happy-go-lucky. The plot is twisted back and forth and back again. Some things become clear as the adventure unravels; some, never do. In the end, it is the journey that counts, for the characters, and perhaps, for the reader. I do warn those who have to have to have to have everything neatly explained by the end of a book, though; you won't get that here. What you'll get is a great adventure, a page-turner, a great coming-of-age story, and three very likable characters, all in their own way. Recommended for those who like Polish accents, foxes, and Knight Rider (I dunno, the descriptions of the technology somehow made me think of this old TV show!)
  • (4/5)
    This is one of those books that I liked a lot, and I was very, very into when I was reading it, but I still have some issues (hmmm) with some major aspects of the story.One weird thing (unrelated to my issues) is that I was debating whether to start this, or The Goldfinch first, and I ended up with The Goldfinch, so when I read this it was awesomely surprising to find another Polish character, this time a little kid, which was like encountering another manifestation of Boris. Although in a completely different book. I'm always mystified when that happens, when I end up reading two very unrelated books that share something that I would otherwise find very unique. In this book, the main character, a teenage boy named Seth, wakes up after an accident (essentially, whatever) in a bizarre version of his childhood home, and then has to cope with that and figure stuff out. For a while, the story cranks along alternating between his strange new world and his memories of what was going on with his life up to that point. My other comments are more deeply entwined with the plot twisty parts. Starting with the end ... I'm a fan of the open ending, but this was challenging for me because it also had a very open middle. I would have preferred less openness somewhere in the book. I felt like Ness was trying to spin out some different interesting possibilities for Seth's reality, but the effect was only moderately successful for me because it was hard to get too emotionally connected to any particular possibility because it just didn't seem to matter. I needed a little more to hang my hat on.I was also a little surprised that the plot was so Matrix-y, in a way that made me keep waiting for more of either an obvious homage OR a huge departure, neither of which happened. I almost feel that the most likely scenario is that the author has never actually seen The Matrix, and one day he will watch it, and be mortified. On a much more basic plot level, I was confused about the very, very tiny number of coffins located outside the facility. I get that there wasn't enough room, but only two? That seems like it wouldn't even be worth the effort to run the infrastructure out to the homes. Something like 5% would make more sense. And a plus, I found a lot of it super, super suspenseful! I would literally gasp at the end of a chapter. The atmosphere was extremely creepy. I liked the world, and I liked almost all of the characters.
  • (4/5)
    "A book...it's a world all on its own. A world made of words...where you live for a while."

    This is a beautiful story of life and death and hope. It questions what it means to BE alive. I found myself fully immersed in this dystopian world. I was fully engaged with the characters. I lived for a while in this book!

    One of the best YA of 2013.
  • (4/5)
    I really did love how this book makes you question, pretty much, everything. You fly through it and then it completely turns the tables on you, asking you, does any of it actually matter?

    Absolutely loved the concept.

    Seriously, where does Ness get his creative genius from? I want whatever he's having.
  • (4/5)
    I don't even know how to review this book. There's a lot here to examine what it means to be human, what it means to be alive, what it means to have faith. However, there is something about Ness as an author that doesn't ring entirely true with me. I'm pretty sure this is just me, not any fault with him or his writing, just me. This should not dissuade you from picking up any of his titles.
  • (3/5)
    I was a little disappointed by this book as it just wasn't as powerful as The Knife of Never Letting Go.It's another example of a book where I liked the concept more than the execution. The first half of the novel was very strong. After Seth's dramatic "death", the opening chapters where he wanders alone through the ruined town are very tense. Although little happened, there was always the threat that something would and the mystery of whether or not it really was Seth's Hell. The flashes of Seth's life also really drew me in and I found myself completely invested in the tragedy of his past.However, I started to lose interest in the second part when the novel took a turn towards the dystopian. I never really connected with Regine and Tomasz in the way that I did Seth and his school friends. The science fiction elements felt unoriginal and slapped on, taking a little too much from The Matrix and never fully explaining themselves (or the strange advanced technology the humans seemed to possess.The philosophy also felt pretty heavy handed. It's wasn't all that subtle, largely spoon-feeding the reader some weighted discourses on the nature of reality that didn't really sound as though they came from the mouth of a teenage boy. However, I did love the themes of the novel. The story dealt with themes like homosexuality, child abuse and victim blaming in a mature way and its ultimate anti-suicide message was quite beautiful.All in all, it's a mixed bag. I don't regret reading it but it's not the best that Ness has to offer.
  • (5/5)
    Wow. Just wow. I'm not sure where to start on this awesome book. I picked it up for the first time yesterday and now I'm done and I'm sitting here begging for more. The writing style was awesome. I loved the dreams the most. The secrets in there threw me for such a loop that I stopped reading and had to process my emotions. I was on the edge of my seat for the entire book. A
  • (4/5)
    A little matrix like, a little dystopian, very Ness.
  • (4/5)
    The twists and turns of the plot line kept me on guessing! I still had questions at the end of the book, but it really turned into a meditation about what it means to be alive and finding meaning in one's life. Seth dies at the beginning of the book and soon after it is clear that it was his decision to end his life. When he awakes back in England in his childhood home, he's convinced that he is in a personal version of hell. But the burned out city and appearance of others brings that all into question. Seth's life then and now is revealed in a series of dreams and flashbacks. The book is dark, compelling, and thoughtful and one that doesn't have any easy answers.
  • (2/5)
    I finished this book weeks ago and just couldn't bring myself to review it. I really like Patrick Ness, but this book was awful. The beginning was really slow and I really had to force myself to keep reading. I made it to the end, but it was nothing new or interesting. If you've watched The Matrix then please don't read this book; it's just more of the same.
  • (4/5)
    More Than This is definitely hard to review because the art of this book is in the revealing of possibilities . . . "a thinking book for readers who don't mind ambiguity" is how I explained it recently. It reminded me of The Maze Runner (though it's much, much better). However, the readers who liked the Maze Runner may not have the patience for this one. I felt like I'd read the story before, long ago, though no particular titles come to mind. Its complexity defies categorization, and there are reasons this book could never have been a first novel. I would never recommend readers start with this Ness book; rather, try the Chaos Walking series or A Monster Calls first.
  • (3/5)
    Seth killed himself. he knows he did, but is wakes up alone, alive in a dead town. Finding two others, he attempts to discover what the truth is, and why a mysterious being is trying to capture them.
  • (4/5)
    My goodness, what a surprisingly powerful book. A fascinating meditation on the power of life, and what it means to be alive. Hard to describe, in many ways, but entirely worth a read for that very reason.
  • (4/5)
    I need a new shelf called "Books that are Impossible to Review without Spoiling." Yet, I will attempt a review later (probably on the blog, combined with the hard-to-review We Were Liars). 4.5 stars, could be bumped up to a GoodReads 5 later.
  • (5/5)
    Personal Response-- I devoured this book in less than a week! It was very well written and talking about difficult subjects like suicide and homosexuality is not common in literature. I thought it brought up some good thoughts in how technology is over taking everything and that people are unaware of so much that is going on around them. We must be aware of that we can impact others yet having assumptions can change everything. Relationships with parents and students are meaningful but only if they are truly aware of what their own specific impact they have towards a person. Curricular connections- This would be great for high school but some issues on the controversial subjects of a suicidal gay teenager probably wouldn't be acceptable in the regular classroom. I do see this as a valuable novel in recognizing individuality and letting go of the past.
  • (4/5)
    Huge admiration for the tight plotting and superbly drawn characters. Loved the running dark joke about the neatness of the plot. Added to the suspense and fully consistent with Seth's character and adolescent solipsism in general. An intense read that took me back to some dark times - and to my young self who hung on in there, believing that there was more than this. (There is.)
  • (4/5)
    'Haven't you ever felt like there had to be more? Like there's more out there somewhere, just beyond your grasp, and if you could only get to it...'Imagine you wake up unaware of where you are or how you got there but the last thing you remember is dying. You died, yet somehow you didn't because you're obviously still alive, right? But imagine that you wake up in a world that seems strange; off somehow. And you can't find a single soul, it's as if the world has been completely emptied leaving only you. This is the situation Seth finds himself in.'He can feel himself teetering again, an abyss of confusion and despair looking right back at him, threatening to swallow him if he so much as glances at it.'This is such an engrossing tale. I was riveted and couldn't put this down. I went into this with a completely different set of expectations but they were completely dashed. The beginning of this tale had the same feel of quiet desolation that The Road has and I was enthralled, but Ness turned this into a total game. Just when you think you finally have a grasp on what's really going on he not only removes some vital piece of evidence but completely transforms the landscape. And this happened many, many times. I was still attempting to get a good grasp on what was truly happening with only 5 pages remaining. It's tagged as YA but involves such a sophisticated storyline that makes it vastly different than anything out there. I can't think of a single book to compare it to and that's a wonderful thing. I hope that the YA designation doesn't deter typical adult readers. I hope that the philosophical designation doesn't deter YA readers. Suffice it to say, this book needs no designation and is something that I recommend to all for the mind-boggling experience this entails.'Real life is only ever just real life. Messy. What it means depends on how you look at it. The only thing you've got to do is find a way to live there.''More Than This' is an incredibly multi-layered and surprisingly philosophical story about how your outlook and interpretation on life has the power to change...everything. It's about living life and realizing that there is always something more to live for and always... more than this.
  • (4/5)
    After finally reading Ness' The Knife of Never Letting Go a month or so ago, I was very curious to try his forthcoming novel. What I'm sure of more than ever now is that Ness is a massive talent. I am also convinced that his books will not work for everyone, because they are daring and strange and twisty and complex. More Than This is a cinematic, philosophical confusing novel, but one I ultimately found fascinating.I find myself rather at a loss on how to review this book, given that practically anything would be a spoiler, since this is a book that opens up, revealing new layers. For the first hundred or so pages, all you know is what's revealed in the blurb, and talking about anything past that in any detailed way would be to reveal spoilers best left in the dark. Thus, this will probably be short and vague, but bear with me.The storytelling of More Than This has a rather unique feel to it. Though told in what might seem like a fairly ordinary third person limited narrative, there's something cinematic about More Than This. The novel unfolds like a movie before the reader's eyes, a twisty movie like Memento or Inception that people need to watch several times over to have any sort of solid understanding of what's happening. Even more fascinating is that Seth seems to have a postmodern awareness of his role in the narrative, often calling situations before they even happened, as though he is the creator of his own story.Seth dies in the prologue, drowns in icy waters. But then he awakens in his childhood home in England, the one his family moved away from after his brother was kidnapped by an escaped prisoner from the neighboring prison. He's thirsty, hungry, and weak. And dead? Seemingly alone, he gathers what food is unexpired and searches out clothing that fits to replace the bandages that covered his body. Whenever he rests, Seth dreams of his life, of his parents who never forgave him for what happened to his brother, of his friends who abandoned him, and his boyfriend who he maybe loved.Of course, there's so much more to More Than This, rather appropriate no? Only I can't tell you about it. I could compare it to a particular film, but that would be a spoiler like whoa. Keeping things incredibly simple, I had some questions about the worldbuilding, serious ones, but I loved the message of the story, one of looking at the beauty in life and finding your more. I'm also not convinced it really needed to be quite so long. For such a massive book, this review feels rather ineffectual book, but the book itself serves as a sort of metaphor for life and how we take it for granted. It's a journey to be undertaken by the reader.
  • (3/5)
    I was mostly liking it until the end.
  • (4/5)
    This is, in some ways, a novel-length entry into the It Gets Better campaign, but it's also a pretty good sci-fi story.