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The Whiskey Sea

The Whiskey Sea

Написано Ann Howard Creel

Озвучено Angela Dawe


The Whiskey Sea

Написано Ann Howard Creel

Озвучено Angela Dawe

оценки:
4/5 (7 оценки)
Длина:
8 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Aug 23, 2016
ISBN:
9781522639701
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Running rum during Prohibition, she'll risk her life-and her heart.

Motherless and destitute, Frieda Hope is determined to make a better life for herself and her sister, Bea. The girls are taken in by a kindly fisherman named Silver, and Frieda begins to feel at home on the water. When Silver sells his fishing boat to WWI veteran Sam Hicks, thinking Sam would be a fine husband for Frieda, she's outraged. But Frieda manages to talk Sam into teaching her to repair boat engines instead, so she has a trade of her own and won't have to marry.

Frieda quickly discovers that a mechanic's wages won't support Bea and Silver, and is lured into a money-making team of rumrunners supplying alcohol to New York City speakeasies. Speeding into dangerous waters to transport illegal liquor, Frieda gets swept up in the lucrative, risky work-and swept off her feet by a handsome Ivy Leaguer who's in it just for fun.

As danger mounts and her own feelings threaten to drown her, can Frieda find her way back to solid ground-and to a love that will sustain her?

Издатель:
Издано:
Aug 23, 2016
ISBN:
9781522639701
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Ann Howard Creel is the author of two award-winning young adult novels, Water at the Blue Earth and A Ceiling of Stars.

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3.9
7 оценки / 3 Обзоры
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  • (4/5)
    Very glad I took a chance on this audio book! I think I purchased it because of a low price. I did so believing even if I did not like the book I would only be out a small amount of money. I do this often and this time it paid off!

    Generally my taste is more modern books but this story set during the prohibition era totally captivated me. Both the story line and the characters held my attention! The main focus is a young girl, who became orphaned along with her younger sister, after their mother passed away. The mother was a prostitute who succumbed to an STD. The girls are taken in by a local clammer who tries his best to prepare them for their future. The oldest rebells and finds unconventional ways to support her family. The story is filled with excitement, risk taking and even romance. It is not really a happily ever after story but is not a total downer either. I highly recommend give this book a chance!
  • (3/5)
    Historical romance: Frieda Hope, orphaned at age 5, is taken in with her baby sister Beatrice by a grizzled solitary fisherman, Silver, who raises them as his own. When Frieda grows up , she refuses a "regular" girl's life on the shore, getting married, having a family. She longs to go out to sea in Silver's boat, but that dream is dashed when he sells it to another stalwart family friend, Hicks. Feeling like her dreams were betrayed, Fried sulks and then decides to become a boat mechanic, & convinces Hicks to take her on as his apprentice to learn the trade. Set in the 1920s on the shore across from glittering New York City, Prohibiton provides the struggling fishermen, & village folks with another source of income as "rum runners". Frieda is invited by an ambitious & high skilled skipper, "Dutch" to be his mechanic on his swift rum running boat. The pay outs are huge, and Silver needs medical care in his old age after his stroke. Bea dreams of going to college to be a teacher & Frieda is determined to give that to her. In spite of Hicks' warnings and Silver's mute but unmistakable disapproval & worry, Frieda signs on & begins a dangerous but exhilerating job with Dutch & Rudy, the mate; one more addition arrives that summer- a casual, movie idol handsome young man who Dutch introduces as "Princeton". He's seeking adventure before buckling down to study law at Harvard as his wealthy family expects. Inevitably, in spite of Frieda's "tough guy" exterior, she is drawn to Charles Wallace III & as they gradually fall into a summertime romance, Frieda realizes how much she does want to be loved, & especially by this sophisticated, cool-headed New Yorker. At one point I thought Creel was going to weave in Jay Gatsby "back story", & "Princeton" would turn out to be him!! Not so...Some unsupported characterization changes weakens the novel's overall believability -esp Frieda's & eventually, Bea's. The 1920s Prohibition East coast, Gatsby-esque atmosphere is intriguing complete with specific details of the 1920s scene, fashion, drinks, dances & the life of rum runners and their suppliers/buyers, including the gradual infiltration of what must be the mob, gangsters who will kill to seize the everyday "runners" boats, money, and the bootleg liquor. Definitely needed better editing: several glaring errors both in typographical repeats and simple plot details - Hicks drinking iced tea on the porch and he's now sitting down his lemonade glass two pages later??... The danger, suspenseful scenes and poignant coming of age longing for our protagonist make this a good read, but not great.
  • (4/5)
    Many, many years ago now, my mom read a book by Ann Howard Creel called The Magic of Ordinary Days and needed to talk about it. In fact, it was this book that inspired the creation of our now long standing summer book club, so when I was offered the chance to read Howard's newest book, I was intrigued. The Whiskey Sea, Howard's latest, is quite different in topic from that earlier novel although it does share some similarities in theme. Like the earlier novel, it would make a wonderful book club choice, begging, as it does, for discussion.In a small, seaside fishing town not far from New York City, Frieda Hope is the oldest daughter of the town prostitute. No one knows who her father is. When her mother dies, Frieda and her younger sister are left alone in the world until a solitary fisherman named Silver takes them in. Growing up in Silver's care, the girls are cherished and cared for. Frieda is drawn to the sea and wants nothing more than to go out fishing once she's finished with school. She's prickly and defensive, wanting to survive and thrive in a man's world, so when Silver sells the boat she'd hoped to one day own to provide her with the money to go to secretarial school or the like, she is crushed. Even for the love of this crusty old fisherman, she cannot bring herself to give up her dream. Apprenticing with the boat's gentle new owner, she learns to work on engines, earning a reputation as a skilled mechanic. And when she's offered the lucrative job of being the engineer on a bootlegger's boat, it's a position she can't and won't turn down despite the disapproval of those closest to her. It is the only way she can continue to support her sister's academic ambitions and pay for the care that Silver, incapacitated by a stroke, needs. But descending into the illegal world of rum-running changes her life in more than just financial ways, testing her courage, introducing her to an intoxicating love, and revealing things about the past and her own character she might not have wanted to know.Frieda is a tough character. She knows what she wants and she will bulldoze her way to it if anyone stands in her way. She is unconventional and stubborn and she holds a grudge against the town for their treatment of her mother in life and in death. She tries very hard to minimize her femininity not only because of her desire to do "man's work" but also in an effort to be something other than her mother was. Her damn the torpedoes personality can be a handicap to her when she doesn't consider all of the potential outcomes of her choices, not the people she could hurt, nor how she might hurt herself. But Frieda's character shows a tremendous amount of growth throughout the novel, going from a determinedly unthinking woman to more thoughtful one able to consider others beyond herself. The backdrop of Prohibition and the evolution both of flouting the law and of enforcing the law add a unique and interesting angle to the story. Creel does a good job conveying not only the thrill of the danger but also the sick feeling, the monotony, and the fear that accompanied each and every trip out to pick up contraband. The secondary characters in the novel were foils that highlighted the growing that Frieda was doing but they were charming or interesting in their own right, written briefly but as real people. The novel is a quick read, only bogging down a bit during the love story. Creel weaves in issues of surviving in difficult times, coming of age on one's own terms, and love of many types into the story. This is a compelling read for fans of historical fiction with an interest in the Prohibition and for those who appreciate strong women.