Найдите свой следующий любимый аудиокнига

Станьте участником сегодня и слушайте бесплатно в течение 30 дней
On the Banks of Plum Creek

On the Banks of Plum Creek

Написано Laura Ingalls Wilder

Озвучено Cherry Jones


On the Banks of Plum Creek

Написано Laura Ingalls Wilder

Озвучено Cherry Jones

оценки:
4.5/5 (131 оценки)
Длина:
6 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 7, 2017
ISBN:
9780060754228
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге

Описание

Based on the real-life adventures of Laura Ingalls Wilder, On the Banks of Plum Creek is the fourth book in the award-winning Little House series, which has captivated generations of readers.

The adventures of Laura Ingalls and her family continue as they leave their little house on the prairie and travel in their covered wagon to Minnesota. They settle into a house made of sod on the banks of beautiful Plum Creek. Soon Pa builds them a sturdier house, with real glass windows and a hinged door. Laura and Mary go to school, help with the chores around the house, and fish in the creek. Pa's fiddle lulls them all to sleep at the end of the day. But then disaster strikes—on top of a terrible blizzard, a grasshopper infestation devours their wheat crop. Now the family must work harder than ever to overcome these challenges.

The nine books in the timeless Little House series tell the story of Laura's real childhood as an American pioneer, and are cherished by readers of all generations. They offer a unique glimpse into life on the American frontier, and tell the heartwarming, unforgettable story of a loving family sticking together through thick and thin.

A HarperAudio production.

Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 7, 2017
ISBN:
9780060754228
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге


Об авторе

Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867–1957) was born in a log cabin in the Wisconsin woods. With her family, she pioneered throughout America’s heartland during the 1870s and 1880s, finally settling in Dakota Territory. She married Almanzo Wilder in 1885; their only daughter, Rose, was born the following year. The Wilders moved to Rocky Ridge Farm at Mansfield, Missouri, in 1894, where they established a permanent home. After years of farming, Laura wrote the first of her beloved Little House books in 1932. The nine Little House books are international classics. Her writings live on into the twenty-first century as America’s quintessential pioneer story.

Связано с On the Banks of Plum Creek

Похоже на «Аудиокниги»

Обзоры

Что люди думают о On the Banks of Plum Creek

4.7
131 оценки / 43 Обзоры
Ваше мнение?
Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд

Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    Each book in the series is a blend of sweet moments and heartbreak. For every Christmas morning filled with joy, there is a blizzard, leeches, wild fires, or a plague of grasshoppers. The things they survived are incredible. Yet despite the traumatic events in their lives, it’s often the relatable moments that are the most memorable. Going to school for the first time, longing for a fur cape on the church Christmas tree, snobby Nellie who picks on Laura, a small child who takes Laura‘s doll Charlotte, etc. You feel like you are experiencing each moment along side the Ingalls family.
  • (4/5)
    My favourite so far (I'm reading in order) as the books move from the feeling of Pioneer How-To Manual into the realm of actual novel. It's still a series of incidents, but they connect to form a plot (we saw glimmerings of this in the last book, but not at all in the first two, to my mind). As Laura ages we get more deft characterization touches, and the sentence-crafting has improved, with masterful descriptive passages. A real charmer.

    (Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s).
  • (4/5)
    How different the Ingall's Christmas were. Can you imagine a child today being happy because they got 6 pieces of candy. Or canned oysters.They had so little, but the appreciated it more.
  • (4/5)
    The Ingalls family moves from Kansas to Minnesota, into a sod hut cut into the side of a hill. Pa builds a clean new house with the help of a bachelor neighbor), going into debt for the materials, but his first wheat crop is eaten out by grasshoppers, and he has to move away to work. Ma and the girls learn how to manage on their own, but the hardships are mitigated by the beauty of the homestead and their love for each other.Whether all of this happened to Laura's family or not, she once more "stands in" for the experiences of many of the pioneers caught short by their ignorance of the cycles of nature in a new land.I started reading the "Little House" books because of my daughter-in-law's love for them, and because she was reading them to my grand-children. I somehow skipped that phase in my own youth, as my reading was not exactly "age appropriate" after about the 2nd grade, going pretty directly from Dr. Seuss & Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle to Robert Heinlein & Co. I actually think I am enjoying them more now than I would have then, with some knowledge of history and raising a family, and a greater appreciation for Laura's writing style, which consists of non-nonsense narrative, sometimes blunt descriptions of harrowing events, a firm remembrance of what little girls are like, and a lyrical descriptive facility that conveys her love for the beauty of the landscape and animals that made her childhood joyful despite its tribulations.
  • (4/5)
    After leaving their "Little House on the Prairie", the Ingalls family travels to and settles in Minnesota. Pa has high hopes for doing well raising wheat but is thwarted by grasshoppers which eat everything in sight. Laura, now 8 years old, and her older sister Mary are finally living close enough to a town where they can walk to school, and Carrie is no longer just the baby. All the Little House books are good, but this one just doesn't speak to me as some of the others do. There is less of daily interactions and description of life, and much of the time spent near Plum Creek is skipped over.Still a good read, and a necessary part of the series.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed Little House in the Big Woods and Little House on the Prairie, but I really felt like Wilder hit her stride in this book. The foreshadowing was brilliant (feeding the grasshopper a blade of grass a little more so than the constant vocal worries about borrowing against the wheat crop, which were a little heavy handed), and I think the characters really became more three-dimensional in this book. There was less of the "here's how we did things back then" and more of just the story and the family and how they weathered the hardships together.

    And man, were there hardships. If I ever actually do move to a cabin in the woods, it will not be in western Minnesota.
  • (5/5)
    Another good tale in the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder. For some reason, I did not remember this one. After 94 inches of snow last winter, I had a good appreciation of the blizzard scenes.
  • (4/5)
    The fourth installment of Laura Ingalls Wilder's memoirs starts off a little more slowly than the other books, as the family moves to Minnesota and establishes another homestead. For the first portion of the book, the Ingalls family lives in a dugout house and the tales are more mundane. However, soon Charles builds a house for his family and familiar names and faces start cropping up for fans of the television series. I enjoyed the tales at the end of the book far more than the beginning.
  • (4/5)
    The Ingalls family moves to Minnesota where they start out by living in a sod house. With the promise of the wheat crop, Charles gets the wood to build the family a nice, new clean house. However, grasshoppers arrive and ruin all of the crops and leave the family with choices to make.
  • (4/5)
    Read aloud to the boys.
  • (3/5)
    Laura and her family have moved now from Kansas to Minnesota. They live first in a sod house, built underneath the prairie. Then Pa builds a brand new house, on the hopes of the wheat crop. Unfortunately, grasshoppers kill that hope.
  • (5/5)
    A lot of pretty hair-raising action in this installment, what with "cruel Indians," a terrible storm, and a bear in the corral; I might wait 'til the kids are six or eight before they get this one.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not 100% sure, but I think the last Little House book that I've read is the first I've read. I remember one of my grade school readers had an excerpt from this volume. Anyway, I digress. Through circumstances not entirely in my control, I've ended up reading the Little House series out of order and though this book is in the middle of the series, I've read it last of all. I was expecting a slightly modified version of Little Town on the Prarie, namely a series of vignettes from the ongoing life of Ms. Wilder. Instead I was a bit surprised to read a tale of the Ingalls family getting knocked down by this problem and that, then getting back on their feet to try again. It made me wish I had made the effort to read the series in order, so I could experience the overall sweep of the series. (And perhaps Ms. Wilder's growth as a writer?) Oh, well. What more can I say than, "check it out?" (Well, I suppose I could add that Michael Landon took a LOT of liberties with the source material when he did the television show....)--J.
  • (5/5)
    This was my favorite when I was a kid, but I can't quite recall why.
  • (5/5)
    One of the sweetest and richest in the series. You know at the end of this one that Laura's childhood is over.
  • (4/5)
    A rather abrupt jump in the chronology of the series. Laura left out some difficult and sad parts of her life. When this story begins, sister Mary has already lost her sight. Wilder also completely left out an unsuccessful move to Iowa and the death of her baby brother.
  • (4/5)
    It was fun to read this again for the first time since I visited Plum Creek and waded in the water out front of the homesite last summer. I enjoyed this chapter of the Ingalls' life more than the previous one, but I'm finding Pa to be a real annoyance. I know he was a loving father, but I don't think he put his family first. Fascinating slice of Americana, though.
  • (3/5)
    Another one i hadn't yet read. I didn't love this one as much as the others. It's perhaps more of a let down because I just read Farmer Boy, which was such a delight. All I can think after reading this is, "Good god. Pa was a freakin' moron." I mean, really...he was a selfish twit. He was like a squirrel, always on to the next shiny thing, never mind that he's dragging his wife and kids all over creation.

    And the whole, "grasshopper weather" thing...really, Pa? You thought it was just "some Norwegian thing"? Pretty sure a grade school kid could figure that one out. Also, his going out in a blizzard...wtf was he thinking? Once again, I know kids who have better sense than that. He was a grown man. What the hell was he thinking?

    I'm starting to dislike Pa as much as I hate Mary.

    Anyway, glad I read it. Not bad, just not as good as the others.
  • (4/5)
    More of the same from the Little House series, which is to say, simple writing rising at times to the poetic along with compelling stories of life on the frontier. We meet the horrid Nellie Oleson in this one, and here, too, is the terrifying grasshopper scene, where a swarm of grasshoppers denudes the prairie of every single green thing, including all of Pa's crops. It's truly heartbreaking and terrifying, even when you know it's coming. Some of the incidents in Plum Creek were depicted fairly faithfully on the television show, most notably Nellie's sophisticated party and Laura and Mary's subsequent party in the country. I read those chapters with a bit of surprise and delight, because most of the TV series is really inspired by, rather than based on, the books, and it was pleasant to see that here was a bit that actually came to the screen in much the way it was written.
  • (5/5)
    This book follows Laura Ingalls and her family after their return north from Indian Territory to Minnesota. It mixes the focus on simplicity of lifestyle found in "Little House on the Big Woods" with the more socially aware nature of "Little House on the Prairie." While not as historically charged as "Prairie" was, the emotional impact in this book is still there, with the family struggling through hard economic times. The description of the plague of grasshoppers in this book alone makes it worth reading, as it is so vivid and impossible for a modern audience to imagine that it would seem unbelievable if this weren't based on a true story. This book also introduces the infamous Nellie Oleson character known so well from the "Little House on the Prairie" television series. It is a pleasant follow-up to the "Prairie" book, continuing in the deliciously readable narrative style of that work.
  • (5/5)
    Probably my favourite book of the series. A great read.
  • (4/5)
    The best so far of the Little House series.
  • (4/5)
    This chapter in the Ingalls family is marked by high hopes that end up unfulfilled. I can't even imagine a cloud of grasshoppers so thick that it blots out the sun and covers every inch of ground so that you can't walk or breath. And blizzards that happen all winter long, one after another. While the experiences are certainly interesting, I found myself wishing for better days for the family.
  • (4/5)
    This is the fourth book in the Little House on the Prairie series. The Ingalls family has now moved to Minnesota where they start out by living in a sod house. With the promise of the wheat crop, Charles gets the wood to build the family a nice, new clean house. However, grasshoppers arrive and ruin all of the crops and leave the family with choices to make. This is the book that the well known character, Nellie Olsen, appears. Many know here from the TV series.
  • (5/5)
    No date on when I read this book because, being my favorite of Laura Ingalls books, I read it about a dozen times as a child. This book inspired all my imaginative play as a child, raking the yard became a farm chore. The bottom bunk of my sisters' bed became the dugout. The crickets chirping outside the window as I slept became the locusts crawling toward us. And my first biography project in school was written about the author. These books shaped my childhood, and I don't know who I'd be if I hadn't read them.
  • (5/5)
    Delightful tale of the Ingalls family in Minnesota. Especially good describing the plague of locusts and the great snow storm. This is a re-read after 50+ years and it was just as good now as it was then.
  • (4/5)
    Another great book by Laura Ingalls Wilder!
  • (4/5)
    I read all the Little House books as a kid (and I've read the whole series more than a few times as a grown-up). I always enjoyed this installment, and was fascinated and disgusted by the grasshopper episodes recounted here. I always try to remember how this family took a lot of hard knocks but never gave up. They always dusted themselves off and kept at it. That's admirable. I think these are books that can still be relatable to modern readers.
  • (4/5)
    So far this is our favorite Little House story. The kids were surprised at how much action and adventure there can be settling down on a farm. Fires, floods, grasshoppers and blizzards kept even Blake excited to hear what would happen next. And Laura is at just the right age for them to identify with. We have jumped right into the next one and hope it will be just as exciting.
  • (2/5)
    Third in the Little House series, again read by Cherry Jones. Quite good! This one deals with the Ingalls family's settlement in... was it Minnesota? At any rate, they start to grow wheat but are attacked by grasshoppers. Not a very happy book for the Ingalls family!