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Just Wait Till You Have Children of Your Own

Just Wait Till You Have Children of Your Own

Написано Erma Bombeck

Озвучено Barbara Rosenblat


Just Wait Till You Have Children of Your Own

Написано Erma Bombeck

Озвучено Barbara Rosenblat

оценки:
3.5/5 (48 оценки)
Длина:
2 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Oct 16, 2000
ISBN:
9781436178587
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

If you're young, old, or in the middle, get ready to laugh out loud with Erma Bombeck, America's funniest lady. This outrageously witty book proves that humor is the best way to keep on keel--even with a teenager in the house.

You've finally figured out what makes your child tick, when one day you wake up to discover a teenager under your roof. Suddenly life is filled with a whole new set of worries: Why isn't she dating? Why is she dating? Why can't he can't pass his driving test. Why is he out so late with the car?

Wise in the ways of teenagers, Erma Bombeck celebrates both the joys and difficulties of watching children grow into adults. Barbara Rosenblat provides the perfect voice for energetic young people and their baffled parents.

Издатель:
Издано:
Oct 16, 2000
ISBN:
9781436178587
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

Erma Bombeck (1927–1996) was one of the best-loved humorists of her day, known for her witty books and syndicated columns. In 1967, she published At Wit’s End, a collection of her favorite columns. Bombeck would go on to write eleven more books, including The Grass Is Always Greener Over the Septic Tank (1976), If Life Is a Bowl of Cherries, What Am I Doing in the Pits? (1978), and Aunt Erma’s Cope Book (1979). Her books were perennial bestsellers, and helped bolster her reputation as one of the nation’s sharpest observers of domestic life. She continued writing her syndicated column until her death in 1996.     


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3.3
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  • (3/5)
    At times I cared about Dolores and didn't want to stop reading. However, when the life-altering events happened (and there were many of them), I found the writing awkward and I disconnected from the novel. I was hoping for a great ending, but was disappointed. The novel was just okay - not great, but not awful.
  • (4/5)
    Delores' character is lovable and annoying at times. She's just like a real human, isn't she? :PBut anyways, really, there were some parts of the book where I'm just like "REALLY????" flabbergasted, and other times I was just like "Yes girl, take the higher road!" and just wanted to be like her in instances. Overall, it's a wonderful book that really gets you thinking about YOU at times because you reflect so much after.
  • (4/5)
    Dark and disturbing but in its own way quite brilliant. It's been a long time since I read it, but my memory is that it left me with a similar feeling to Janet Fitch's work, somewhere in between Paint It Black (which was beautiful and dark but somehow not as good as her first) and White Oleander (which blew me away and remains one of my favorite books of all time).
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book. A lot of the scenarios are a little over the top, but then again, I like that sort of thing which is why I prefer fiction books over non-fiction. I did like Lamb's other novel better though-- I Know This Much is True.
  • (3/5)
    I didn't love it. At times, I hated Dolores. At times, I was Dolores. This is definitely one of those books I wish goodreads did half stars for because I'm torn between a 3 or 4 star rating. There were some beautiful moments though and those are the parts that stand out and make me lean closer to a 4. I'll probably change my rating once I sit down to review.
  • (5/5)
    Warning! She's Come Undone by Wally Lamb will not let go of you until you finish the book. I have had this book on my shelf for a long time but decided to tackle it recently. My copy is 465 pages and not in big print but with dark ink, thank goodness.I have been reading books lately that have a common theme, obesity and dysfunctional families. Since I have always had a weight problem since I was twelve I am holding onto the main character, Dolores Price's tip to imagining mold on the food that you want to avoid. There is much more to this tornado of a book, starting when Dolores was only five years old when her father deserted his family, through having a mother dealing with mental illness. and only finding love through the consumption of food. If things got really bad, she would eat as fast as she could, trying to numb herself against a life that she could barely survive. She learns to protect herself with bad language and take outrageous revenge to even with people as she gets older. She has periods of understanding why she does things.What really amazes me is how Wally Lamb could write this book full of female problems without being female himself. Also he gets it so right with how people who are obese feel about themselves and also what it is like having a mother who is mentally ill and then also what the depths of depression is like. I had great difficulty in putting this book down and I am very impressed with his convincing writing. At times I wanted to tell Delores, " No, stop and think about this first before you do it but she didn't listen to me!I highly recommend this very emotional coming of age journey to everyone.
  • (3/5)
    I have strong feelings about this book I just don't know what they are. I'm honestly kind of speechless. I think it was great? Hell, what happened? What did I read? How do you describe such a complex and... uncomplicated book? It's a coming of age story, an awakening, an odyssey of emotional and mental health. It's all over the place. It all centers around Dolores Price, a young girl who isn't the most emotionally stable. She starts off as a fragile little thing and balloons up into a fat, depressed cynic, and then spends the rest of her life roller coasting around until she finds some sort of balance. It's a discussion of women's rights, religion, mental health, family dynamics, romantic relationships, and more. She is a complex, intriguing heroine/villain/comedic actress. Honestly I can't describe this book and do it justice. It takes a little to get into, but one you do, buckle up.
  • (4/5)
    Good read.
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book. A lot of the scenarios are a little over the top, but then again, I like that sort of thing which is why I prefer fiction books over non-fiction. I did like Lamb's other novel better though-- I Know This Much is True.
  • (5/5)
    It's probably no accident that the heroine of Wally Lamb's engaging first novel, "She's Come Undone," is named Dolores, just like Nabokov's young heroine, Dolores Haze, better known as Lolita. The plot lines of these novels also have some obvious similarities, since both heroines are raped by sociopathic older men posing as father figures. But whereas Nabokov's Lolita comes undone from this experience, Lamb's Dolores becomes a survivor after being a victim. She has a lot to overcome: the unraveling of her parents' marriage; her difficult relationship with her mother; being raped at a young age; being ostracized by her peers at school. Dolores copes with her difficulties by rewarding herself with food, but predictably, overeating only adds to her problems. Even the man she falls in love with and eventually marries turns out to be nothing more than a narcissist in love with her adulation rather than with her. Yet by the end of the narrative, the heroine becomes stronger and more self-sufficient rather than weaker because of her troubles.The best contemporary fiction, it seems, offers us two Aristotelian alternatives, as an escape from the humdrum of our lives: heroes that are somehow better than us and who can inspire us or antiheroes whose lives are so disastrous and whose problems are so heart-wrenching that they make our own lives seem downright easy by comparison. In "She's Come Undone," Wally Lamb magically manages to do both at once, which is not an easy task. This master of psychological fiction depicts a compelling heroine who is first defeated, only to rise above the worst life has to offer.Claudia Moscovici, Notablewriters.com
  • (4/5)
    After "I know this much is true" I couldn't leave this book behind, and I wasn't disappointed. I loved Dolores Price and her messy life, loved the whales also, in the end. So inspiring...
  • (4/5)
    It's been a long time since I read this one and I don't remember all the details. But I loved it!
  • (5/5)
    Wally Lamb is the most interesting, amazing author I've read yet. This book is very hard to put down and the last hundred pages kept me spellbound waiting to see what would happen yet.
  • (5/5)
    In this novel, Lamb writes from the POV of a woman in such a real and meaningful way it seems almost absurd...in the best way possible. The novel follows the protagonist from adolescence to middle-age. Her life is devastating from start to almost finish. The ways in which she overcomes each adversity is nothing short of realistic: sometimes amazing and sometimes tragic. If you haven't read this yet, you should.
  • (4/5)
    This book was very interesting and at first I thought that it really was from Dolores. It was riveting. i recommend this book, but there are sexual moments, and adult situations and language.
  • (3/5)
    I read this book based on a friend's recommendation. I really struuggled to get through the book. There was nothing that kept me turning the page to see what happens next. It felt like the book was endless. To be far to the book, I've never encountered the hardships that Dolores faces so maybe I don't have the rigt perspective, but I found it hard to continue to read about a character who spent so much time wallowing in self pity. I wanted to shake her and say "Get over it!!" It sort of felt like a small childs endless story with no seeming plot. Just a series of "And then....." With that being said, I applaud the author's way of bringing me to the time period of the book. I've never seen (or even heard of) most of the TV shows that Dolores watched, but I felt like I had. I loved Dolores' Grandma even before Dolores did. I wanted Dolores to go to college, to lose the weight, to fall in love and have a family. I plan to return this book to my friend with a polite thank you but I will not be forwarding the recommendation to anyone else.
  • (1/5)
    I read this book after hearing everyone in one of my book groups rave about it. Well, I don't know why. I read about 50 pages of it and then it got thrown to the wall.Back Cover Blurb:In his extraordinary coming of age odyssey, Wally Lamb invites us to hitch a wild ride on a journey of love, pain and renewal. At once a fragile girl and a hard-edged cynic, so tough to love yet so inimitably loveable, Dolores Price is as poignantly real as our own imperfections.
  • (5/5)
    This is easily one of my top five favorite books. There is a reason why it is such a long book. I love the way Dolores is developed through such a young age all the way to adult hood, experiencing just about every unfortunate event as possible. The relationships she comes across are from absurd to amazing. She has dealt with so much and it was a great "happy" ending.
  • (5/5)
    This book remains one of my all-time favorites. I never wanted it to end and the story and the characters stayed with me for a very long time.
  • (3/5)
    When I was younger, I thought this book was phenomenal. Lamb writes about emotion pain with grittiness, and it was interesting to see Dolores's progression from beginning to end. However, when I read this again as a near-thirty-year-old adult, it did not have the same interest. My patience with those who wallow in self-pity and harm, as Dolores does for the majority of the book, has worn thin.
  • (3/5)
    I hated this book from start to...well, not quite to finish, because in the last chapters, Dolores' behaviour became mostly acceptable and I found I could actually warm to her a little. Up until then, I thought she was just vile, or if she wasn't being vile, her circumstances were so vile, why did I want to read about them? Was I supposed to sympathise with this person? She wasn't lovable or a heroine. She was just unpleasant. I also feel uneasy about the writer. Why would a man in his middle years want to write about the sexual experiences of a teenage girl? It was competently written, yes, but I still wouldn't wish this book on anyone. In fact, it is single-handedly responsible for convincing me that from now on I should choose more edifying material to spend my precious reading time on. Urgh.
  • (1/5)
    I rarely don't finish a book, but this one of those. I read half of it and gave up in disgust. It's the unremittingly boring desperation of this young girl's life which left me uninterested in completing the journey with her.
  • (5/5)
    It's like Mr. Lamb thumbed through my heart's pages before writing this book.
  • (4/5)
    I read the book, I liked the book but I cannot even begin to tell you how annoying and depressing the character of Delores was throughout the book.I mean I just wanted to really, you know, slap the eyebrows off her face. Yes she went through some trying times but the negativity was overwhelming, just too much but really, what more can you expect but gosh...SLAP! ok much better.Wally Lamb is wonderful and deserves to be read. But Delores, she needs to come undone with a big 'ole snap out of it slap.
  • (3/5)
    Well, I read this back when it was very popular, and I don't remember liking it very much. This always happens to me--those books that seem so meaningful to other readers fall flat for me. But I do remember thinking that the protagonist was just not a very believable person to me. It's a book that supposed to be for women but didn't seem to "get" women--at least, that's how I remember it.
  • (5/5)
    This book was amazing. Wally Lamb did a great job of writing from a woman's point of view. Even if you dislike the protagonist, you end up rooting for her.
  • (5/5)
    Awesome! Wally Lamb miraculously pulls this off--a man writing in first person from a woman's point of view. Totally convincing, I wonder how he has such an intimate understanding of the mind of women? I could relate to so much--Delores Price is my hero. I was able to mourn and celebrate some of my own victories and tribulations in the guise of rooting for the protagonist. This is a truly soul-nourishing work of fiction.
  • (3/5)
    I loved Wally Lamb's "I Know This Much is True" and while I was not expecting to like this one as much as that, I really had hoped to like it more than I did. I found this one very mediocre and really kind of wonder why many readers have rated it so high. It was just "okay" -- nothing spectacular & I wasn't blown away. I did think Lamb did a fairly good job of writing from a female's perspective, but I also think his writing was totally different in this (his first novel) in comparison to his sophomore novel. I have his third on my shelf & am quite curious to see how it compares as well.
  • (1/5)
    didn't finish it. Protagonist was loathsome.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books I've ever read in a very long time. As painful as it was to reach much of the early parts of the book (due to the grim realities of this child's life), Dolores becomes a survivor despite herself. Reading the book felt good.