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The Daughters of Ireland

The Daughters of Ireland

Написано Santa Montefiore

Озвучено Genevieve Swallow


The Daughters of Ireland

Написано Santa Montefiore

Озвучено Genevieve Swallow

оценки:
4/5 (9 оценки)
Длина:
18 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Aug 15, 2017
ISBN:
9780062749697
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Ireland. 1925. The war is over. But life will never be the same...

"Everything Santa Montefiore writes, she writes from the heart," says JOJO MOYES. See why in this unforgettable story of love, loss, and life, perfect for fans of DOWNTON ABBEY and KATE MORTON.

In the green hills of West Cork, Ireland, Castle Deverill has burned to the ground. But young Celia Deverill is determined to see her ruined ancestral home restored to its former glory — to the years when Celia ran through its vast halls with her cousin Kitty and their childhood friend Bridie Doyle.

Kitty herself is raising a young family, but she longs for Jack O'Leary — the long-ago sweetheart she cannot have. And soon Kitty must make a heartbreaking decision, one that could destroy everything she holds dear.

Bridie, once a cook's daugher in Castle Deverill, is now a well-heeled New York City socialite. Yet her celebrity can't erase a past act that haunts her still. Nor can it keep her from seeking revenge upon the woman who wronged her all those years ago.

As these three daughters of Ireland seek to make their way in a world once again beset by dark forces, Santa Montefiore shows us once more why she is one of the best-loved storytellers at work today.

Издатель:
Издано:
Aug 15, 2017
ISBN:
9780062749697
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Born in England in 1970, Santa Montefiore grew up in Hampshire. She is married to writer Simon Sebag Montefiore. They live with their two children, Lily and Sasha, in London.

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  • (4/5)
    Celia, Kitty's cousin, somehow by sheer luck and marrying into a wealthy family, is able to buy Deverill Castle and while it's great they are keeping it in the family, it's still a loss to Kitty. Celia and her wealthy husband plan on restoring the castle to its original state while also adding in some of those extravagant modern amenities. Meanwhile Kitty is living in a smaller house nearby and although she should be happy with her husband and her adopted son, she can't help but long for Jack. Also, Bridie is living in New York City essentially as a socialite and rubbing elbows with society's elite. Her past days of being a maid at the castle are long gone, but she can't forget about the child she gave up. Essentially, she can't run from her past. The Great Depression is looming overhead and it will impact the Deverills, especially Celia. The second book in this riveting historical series is fantastic. If you like historical fiction that is compelling, is a sweeping family saga with a gorgeous Irish setting, give this series a try. The Daughters of Ireland by Santa Montefiore doesn't disappoint.I really enjoyed the character of Kitty in the first book of this series and while I still enjoyed her in The Daughters of Ireland, I didn't necessarily agree with her every move. Her relationship with Jack is heartbreaking. I understand why they can't be together, but it was still upsetting and definitely tugged on my heartstrings. I also understood her resentment of Celia. While she appreciates the fact that Celia "rescued" the castle from demise, it still upsets her that she isn't mistress of the castle. It's only natural and I liked that Kitty grappled with that.Celia is a major focus in The Daughters of Ireland and she was absolutely tiring. Her tirades about her renovations of the castle and her obsession with it was exhausting. Her husband kept reassuring her that all was well financially and it's no problem to spend thousands on something trivial, but readers knew with the Great Depression right around the corner that she should be worrying. Celia deals with a lot in this novel. There's blackmail, family secrets, her husband's secrets, money issues, traveling, and untimely death. Poor Celia is put through the ringer in this book.Bridie is also a major character in The Daughters of Ireland and she goes through a lot as well. Mostly she still is pretty naive and makes some poor choices. I did feel badly for her as she has a hard time coping with the fact that she gave up her son and now Kitty is raising him. That's a tough pill to swallow. Even surrounded by so much wealth and the entire city at her fingertips, she is still unhappy. Things do get better for Bridie eventually, but not until she hits rock bottom.I love the way Montefiore presents this family saga as well as female relationships. I can't wait to read book three and find out what's in store for the Deverills. I am starting to think this series is filling the void that Downton Abbey left. Highly recommended to fans of historical fiction and family sagas.
  • (4/5)
    When I read The Girl in the Castle I didn't know it was book one in a trilogy. That story ended well and didn't leave you hanging. Maybe one little mystery at the end but otherwise, it could have been a stand alone novel. It was quite a treat to find two more books were planned as I very much enjoyed the characters and plot.The next book is titled Daughters of Ireland and picks up where book one left off. The little mystery at the end of book one explains who bought Castle Deverill.The main setting is in West Cork Ireland with part of the story set in London and New York City. We pick up the story of Bridie Doyle, Kitty Deverill and Celia Deverill Mayberry, their paths going different ways but eventually crossing back again. In childhood they were loving and devoted friends but tragedy stirs up a mess of emotional baggage. Love, revenge, fear and determination are a constant in this book.This second book has me screaming for more. So many story lines weaving together, leaving the reader with great anticipation about what happens next. The main characters are all about to collide and I expect many fireworks in book three.If you are a fan of family saga type books you will love this series. It's a touch of Downton Abbey along with rural hard living families spanning a time period of 1925 to 1938 (book 2).Food and drinks are mentioned here and there. I wanted to represent both social economic divisions so I brought a Pomegranate Martini which would appeal to the Deverill family and Scones with cream and jam for the Doyle and O'Leary families.Photos and martini recipe may be found at my blog Novel Meals.
  • (3/5)
    I thoroughly enjoy family sagas in books. If there's a family tree in the front to help keep characters straight, even better. So of course I was thrilled to read the first book in the Deverill Chronicles, The Girl in the Castle and it was everything I expected. With the second book, The Daughters of Ireland, now available to US readers, I had to get my hands on it and see just where the story went.The first novel in the trilogy really centered mostly on Kitty Deverill, whose grandparents lived in Castle Deverill, her growing to adulthood, her choices, her heart, her politics, and her life. This second novel takes a closer look at her cousin Celia and childhood friend Bridie, both of whom loomed large and altered Kitty's life in some way and both of whom were always also tightly woven into the story of Castle Deverill. After the destruction at the end of the first book, cousin Celia and her husband Archie have bought Castle Deverill and she is determined to restore it even beyond its former glory. Kitty is uncomfortable with Celia's plans and ownership of the castle but she is busy in her own life, raising her half brother (Bridie's son) and trying to decide if she can run away to America with Jack O'Leary, the long time love of her life. Meanwhile Bridie has done well for herself in America, inheriting money from a former employer and then marrying a wealthy elderly man who has left her a widow. But she still aches for the son she left behind and for Jack O'Leary, even as her one-time love for best friend Kitty has soured into hatred. As the world changes around them, from the relief and residual sorrow of the end of the Great War, to the financial upending of the Great Depression, and finally to the stirrings of WWII, these three woman, make their way through life, intimately tied to Ireland, the land of County Cork, and the castle in particular as they each learn to live with and accept their pasts.This second novel is very much an Irish soap opera, not only for the intertwined lives of the main characters but also for the sheer variety of things that happen in the plot, the tragedies and losses, and the character turnabouts that occur to so very many. Celia comes across as a self-centered and flighty character who discovers a backbone, a brain, and an indisputable moral compass. Bridie, who was sympathetic in the first novel, is exceedingly unpleasant here and she is not the only one as Grace, Lady Rowan-Hampton, suddenly becomes rather closer to a villain than she previously was. Jack O'Leary, who is understandably frustrated and angry with life, turns into a cold and unsympathetic character as well. Harry Deverill and best friend Boysie stay rather closer to their characters in the first book and the other secondary characters, including the ghosts, now with the addition of the late Adeline Deverill, add color to the story again. In fact, the Shrubs' situation with Lady Rowan-Hampton's father is a huge delight. This second installment offers far more information on the Deverill curse and the history behind it although it is no closer to being broken than it was in book one. The ending here is full of hanging plot threads which gives it a rather unfinished feel, despite its more than 500 pages. Readers not familiar with the first book can read this one but having read the first book to have a full knowledge of everything that sets up the situations here would definitely be the better option. I didn't love it nearly as much as I did the first novel but I'd be lying if I said I wasn't curious to see where the final book goes. The third novel of the trilogy is already out in the UK if you just can't wait to see how Montefiore wraps up this sprawling saga.