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Girl in Disguise

Girl in Disguise

Написано Greer Macallister

Озвучено Stephanie Cozart


Girl in Disguise

Написано Greer Macallister

Озвучено Stephanie Cozart

оценки:
3.5/5 (83 оценки)
Длина:
10 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
21 мар. 2017 г.
ISBN:
9781501944574
Формат:

Описание

For the first female Pinkerton detective, respect is hard to come by. Danger, however, is not.

In the tumultuous years of the Civil War, the streets of Chicago offer a woman mostly danger and ruin--unless that woman is Kate Warne, the first female Pinkerton detective and a desperate widow with a knack for manipulation. Descending into undercover operations, Kate is able to infiltrate the seedy side of the city in ways her fellow detectives can't. She's a seductress, an exotic foreign medium, a rich train passenger--all depending on the day and the robber, thief, or murderer she's been assigned to nab.

Inspired by the real story of Kate Warne, this spirited novel follows the detective's rise during one of the nation's greatest times of crisis, bringing to life a fiercely independent woman whose forgotten triumphs helped sway the fate of the country.

Издатель:
Издано:
21 мар. 2017 г.
ISBN:
9781501944574
Формат:

Об авторе

Raised in the Midwest, Greer Macallister is a novelist, poet, short story writer, and playwright who earned her MFA in creative writing from American University. Her debut novel, The Magician’s Lie, was a USA Today bestseller, and Indie Next pick, and a Target Book Club selection. It has been optioned for film by Jessica Chastain’s Freckle Films. Her novel Girl in Disguise, also an Indie Next pick, received a starred review from Publishers Weekly, which called is “a well-told, superb story.” A regular contributor to Writer Unboxed and the Chicago Review of Books, she lives with her family in Washington, DC.


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3.3
83 оценки / 9 Обзоры
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  • (4/5)
    I grabbed this one on a whim, the cover caught my eye, and it was on the 'New' shelf at the library, so I decided, 'Why not?' Boy am I glad it did! I don't read historical fiction often, but have always loved a good detective story, and enjoy Sherlock retellings, so the idea of a story based of f the life of the first real female detective? I'm listening!

    This one, like most historical fiction, has a much slower pace than I'm used to, but in this case, that's one of the big things I loved about this book! Had things happened any faster, it would have taken away from the enjoyment when things finally 'hit the fan' which I expected would happen at some point. I loved the characters, and while the plot is mostly filled by following Kate on her various assignments, it all weaves together to produce a bitter-sweet, and highly satisfying ending! I highly recommend this book to any historical fiction or female detective fans!
  • (3/5)
    This work of historical fiction dramatizes the career of Kate Warne, the first female Pinkerton agent. She was hired in 1856 and died from a sudden illness in 1868. Extensive files from the Pinkerton Detective Agency are preserved in the Library of Congress. However, those files date primarily from 1871. The great Chicago fire of that 1871 destroyed the files from earlier years. As a result, little factual information exists about Warne, and the book consists of stories about what might or could have happened.Macallister writes in a clear, lucid, but episodic style. The short chapters depict Warne’s efforts to gain employment, her training, and some of her cases. Some events, such as her assignment to accompany Abraham Lincoln to Washington D. C. for his inauguration, are entertaining and informative. However, most of the brief stories do not rise above mildly interesting.Women and some men in the labor force in the 1970s and 1980s will recognize the sexist barriers Warne faced as still prominent 125 years after her death. Although the dramatizations may be informative to young women, I fear they already have first-hand experience with them.The dramatization of Warne’s interactions with Abraham Lincoln—well documented according to Macallister—and the depiction of Washington D. C. during the Civil war were informative. The freedom to travel between the north and south during the war was not something I had imagined. I am not in a position to judge the accuracy of Macallister’s rendition.For some reason, I want to be more positive about this book, but I cannot work up a stronger sense of enthusiasm. It’s okay is the strongest endorsement I can give.
  • (3/5)
    The history behind the book is fascinating, though the novel itself just didn't quite grab me the way I thought it would. I'll have to think about why that is...
  • (5/5)
    I picked this one up as I had read and really enjoyed Macallisters previous novel, The Magicians Lie. I was hoping for all the same elements that I enjoyed with her first novel; action, danger, and a kick ass female led. Let me tell you guys, Macallister delivers yet again!Kate Warne has quite literally no where to turn. A young widow in the 1850’s (don’t feel too bad, she was coerced into a loveless marriage by her good for nothing parents) with no income, she was quite literally almost out on the streets when an ad in the newspaper caught her eye. Pinkerton Detective Agency was hiring a new detective. The fact that there was no such thing as a female detective did not dissuade Kate; if anything, it made her want it even more. Kate is determined and quick witted and Pinkerton takes a chance and hires her on. Kate works twice as hard as every man on the payroll to prove herself, and prove herself she does. With the country on the verge of a civil war, Kates life as an operative takes her on countless dangerous missions, all over the country. Inspired by the real woman who was Americas first detective, this read is one you won’t be able to put down.Y’all, Kate Warne is such a badass! I could read about her operations all. damn. day. This is a historical fiction done right. I do love some action and suspense in my reading and sometimes with a historical fiction, it really just isn’t there (obviously, I mean I’m not expecting them ALL to be, just that for that reason- they normally aren’t my cup of tea) but Girl in Disguise was such a perfect blend of action and plot to the back drop of one of the most important times in American history- the Civil War. The politics of it all are more a backdrop to Kate and her navigating her life as not only an operative at a prestigious detective agency, but a woman fighting gender norms and societal stereotypes on how she should be living her life. Kate is smart, and she uses these stereotypes to her benefit. After all, who would suspect a woman * gasp * of subterfuge and deceit? Kate was firery and brave- just such a great character to read. In addition to the action and danger that the life of an operative entails, we also are shown a more vulnerable side to Kate which was really moving to read. There was loss and heartbreak, and I would be lying if I said I didn’t tear up at some scenes. Do yourself a favor and add this gem to your reading list. I will certainly continue to read anything Greer publishes and look forward to her next book!
  • (4/5)
    It took me a while to get into this work; my beginning it timed up with a stretch where I didn't read that much due to the other aspects of life that intervened. So how long it took me to read this novel shouldn't reflect on how I ultimately felt about it. I enjoyed this look at an obscure female historical figure whose life reads like a James Bond novel. Near death getaways, the trials of detective work, and war make this book hard to put down. Once you're in there, you can’t get away.I bet most people will hear the name Kate Warne and not know the significance of it. Yet, this woman blazed so many trails for women in law-enforcement, showing that just because she wore skirts didn't mean she couldn't think or shoot with the best of the men. The author does a great job in getting into Kate’s head, letting us see the woman behind the detective. While she's highly intelligent and earns the respect of her peers and Pinkerton himself, there's also a vulnerable side, a woman who wants a connection to family, friendship, or romance. The author does a fantastic job and balancing both aspects of this complex woman.I loved getting into the nitty-gritty of Kate’s 19th century detective world as well. With no forensic evidence or fingerprints, the work of bringing justice and ferreting out information is much harder. Exploring the different, clever ways in which Kate and her colleagues went about their work was amazing. Their intelligence and acting skills were showcased to perfection. Then there were the difficulties Kate faced as a woman in this dark world. Having to work extra hard to gain the respect of her clients and fellow detectives, the world at large still feeling it abnormal, unnatural for a woman of her time. My heart went out to her every time she was faced with a slur or accusation; a woman truly ahead of her time.As another reviewer pointed out, this novel contains a ton of life events that Kate experienced and that shaped her. There's enough material in here for a full series, I felt. Yet, the author chose to just provide really snapshots of Kate’s life. I felt like I wasn't getting as deep as I could have if this tale had been spread over multiple books. Maybe the book might have been better served focusing on a part of Kate’s timeline rather than her whole life? But then that has its own problems too. It probably speaks to the writing skills of the author overall that even though I only got my appetite whetted by a few of Kate’s life events, I still felt deeply connected to her.Even though I personally felt like we could have gotten deeper to Kate’s life, I still found myself enthralled by this look at Kate Warne. She's an incredible woman, born before her time, whose intelligence, courage, and strength of will make her a figure for admiration. That's all balanced out with a very human vulnerable side that makes her very relatable. This book is a fantastic first look at this obscure historical figure. While I was left hungry for more, this book still stands out as a solid work. Definitely recommended reading.Note: Book received for free via NetGalley from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
  • (4/5)
    Girl in Disguise is the historical fiction story of Kate Warne who was hired by Allan Pinkerton and became the first female detective in America. When the story opens, Kate is a widow with no work experience. There aren't many options for women in that position in the 1850s, so she answers a Pinkerton Detective Agency advertisement in the local paper. Of course, Pinkerton refuses to hire her but she persuades him to give her a chance and goes on to have a long and successful career.

    I'm not sure what I expected when I first started the book, probably more of a straightforward telling of her story. It turned out to be more of an episodic collection of several of her cases. Some of the cases are years apart so that was a bit disconcerting at first. I did feel like some of the characters were less developed than I would have liked, but by the time I was a third of the way through, I was really enjoying it.

    The author's note at the end of the book was quite interesting and gave me a real appreciation for what an extraordinary woman Kate was. Even though it has some flaws, it's still a book I would recommend to fans of American historical fiction. Because many of the records that detailed her career at Pinkerton were lost in the Great Chicago fire, I did feel like the author created a believable story about Kate.
  • (4/5)
    Girl in Disguise by Greer Macallister is a 2017 Sourcebooks Landmark publication. ‘Someone has to go first’This is a biographical novel based on Kate Warne, the first female Pinkerton detective.I enjoyed reading this fictional account of Kate’s life, how she convinced Pinkerton to hire her, how she eventually garnered the respect of the other detectives, trained other female operatives, and became a spy during the civil war. What a fascinating life!Yet, it would seem Kate was often conflicted about the lies and subterfuge, she was forced to use in order to get the job done, questioning the morality of it, while at the same time reveling in the adventure, and satisfying her need to contribute and be a productive citizen. ‘The Woman I’d become since Pinkerton hired me- excited by subterfuge, capable of any and all lies, slipping into and out of identities like dresses- was she the real me? Had I been her all along, and the good girl I thought myself the real disguise?”I enjoyed reading about the cases she worked, the costumes or disguises she wore, and the roles she played in order to trap the suspects. I was equally impressed with her humanity and fortitude, her loyalty, and remarkable grace under pressure and the mark she left behind for women to someday embark on careers in law enforcement. Her story is compelling, sad in some ways, but ultimately inspiring. Overall, this was a very interesting and absorbing read, and a must for those who enjoy historical fiction. 4 stars
  • (4/5)
    Girl in Disguise by Greer Macallister is based on the real life of the first female Pinkerton agent, Kate Warne. It is 1856 in Chicago, Illinois and Kate Warne needs a job. She is a widow with little in the way of funds. In response to an advertisement, Kate arrives at the offices of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency. Kate is interviewed by Allan Pinkerton who states that they do not hire women. She asks him for an opportunity to prove her worth by solving a case. If she can close the investigation, Kate will get a position. Pinkerton agrees and gives her an opportunity to recover money stolen from First Eagle Savings Bank. With a little assistance, Kate is successful and gets her position as the first female Pinkerton agent. Unfortunately, her fellow agents are not as welcoming as Allan Pinkerton. Kate sets out to learn the skills she needs to be a successful agent and prove to the men that she is an asset. We get to follow Kate as she learns her craft and shows how valuable female agents can be to the agency. Kate is so successful that Pinkerton needs to start a Female Bureau of Detectives, and he wishes Kate to head it. This is a great opportunity for Kate, and she embraces the challenge. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Kate feels her services are more valuable in the field. Kate’s skills could prove vital to the country during this time of upheaval. But life is not all rosy for Kate. Pick up a copy of Girl in Disguise to find out what happens to Kate Warne.Girl in Disguise is a slow starter, but it gets better the further I got into the story. The novel is nicely written, and I did find it appealing. I wish, though, that the author had focused on Kate’s joining the Pinkerton agency and maybe one or two cases. Kate’s life would have made a great series. Each book could have focused on a new case. The novel starts in 1856 and takes us through the end of the Civil War. I was dissatisfied with the romance portion of the book and how it affected Kate. It just did not seem to go with her personality or behavior prior to this point. I give Girl in Disguise 4 out of 5 stars. The book, in a way, reminds me of a biography. But it lacked the depth you would find in one. We do not get enough details on Kate and her life as an agent. It is a superficial overview. I would have loved more details especially when she first started out as an agent. It is supposed to be a fictionalized account, so I wish the author had pushed it a little further. The ending was a bit of a letdown. It would have been nice if the author had included an epilogue showcasing the end of Kate Warne’s life. I am interested in finding out more information about Kate Warne and her life. I know that little information on Kate and her activities survived the Chicago Fire of 1871, but I hope to find more details than were available in Girl in Disguise. If you enjoy reading historical novels, check out Girl in Disguise.
  • (5/5)
    Kate Warne, a widow who was also abandoned by her con-artist parents, applies for a job as a Pinkerton agent in 1856 Chicago. Allan Pinkerton is reluctant to hire a woman but a test case reveals that Kate's skills could come in handy. Though she never feels truly accepted by most of the male agents, Kate is proud to use the abilities she reluctantly learned from her parents to achieve some good. When Pinkerton's agency is called on to investigate traitors in the war, Kate's job becomes extremely dangerous but more important than ever. A fascinating depiction of a real-life woman who blazed a trail for female investigators and spies in the United States. Similar to Girl Waits With Gun but with a more serious tone.