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A Lady's Guide to Etiquette and Murder

A Lady's Guide to Etiquette and Murder

Написано Dianne Freeman

Озвучено Sarah Zimmerman


A Lady's Guide to Etiquette and Murder

Написано Dianne Freeman

Озвучено Sarah Zimmerman

оценки:
4/5 (27 оценки)
Длина:
8 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jun 26, 2018
ISBN:
9781684412815
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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Описание

Frances Wynn, the American-born Countess of Harleigh, enjoys more freedom as a widow than she did as a wife. After an obligatory year spent mourning her philandering husband, Reggie, she puts aside her drab black gowns, leaving the countryside and her money-grubbing in-laws behind. With her young daughter in tow, Frances rents a home in Belgravia and prepares to welcome her sister, Lily, arriving from New York—for her first London season.

No sooner has Frances begun her new life than the ghosts of her old one make an unwelcome appearance. The Metropolitan police receive an anonymous letter implicating Frances in her husband's death. Frances assures Inspector Delaney of her innocence, but she's also keen to keep him from learning the scandalous circumstances of Reggie's demise. As fate would have it, her dashing new neighbor, George Hazelton, is one of only two other people aware of the full story.

While busy with social engagements on Lily's behalf, and worrying if Reggie really was murdered, Frances learns of mysterious burglaries plaguing London's elite. The investigation brings death to her doorstep, and Frances rallies her wits, a circle of gossips, and the ever-chivalrous Mr. Hazelton to uncover the truth.

Издатель:
Издано:
Jun 26, 2018
ISBN:
9781684412815
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге


Об авторе

Dianne Freeman is the acclaimed author of the Countess of Harleigh Mystery series. Her debut novel, A Lady’s Guide to Etiquette and Murder, won both an Agatha Award and a Lefty Award and was nominated for the prestigious Mary Higgins Clark Award from Mystery Writers of America. She spent thirty years working in corporate accounting and finance and now writes full-time. Born and raised in Michigan, she and her husband split their time between Michigan and Arizona. Visit her at www.DiFreeman.com.

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  • (3/5)
    A Lady’s Guide to Etiquette and Murder by Dianne Freeman is the first edition in A Countess at Harleigh Mystery series. Frances Price Wynn, a widow, has just finished her year of mourning and is ready to embrace color once again. Frances is also ready to leave her money hungry in-laws behind and move to London. She has leased a place in Belgravia and is surprised to discover her new neighbor is George Hazelton. Only one of three people who know the truth of what happened the night her husband died. Frances has barely moved in when she receives a letter from her mother announcing she is sending Frances’ sister, Lily along with her Aunt Hetty to London. She wants Frances to usher Lily into London society and help find her a suitable husband. Luckily, she has included a generous check to help with the expenses. Her in-laws did not take her departure well and have filed a lawsuit. While her lawyer assures her that the case does not have merit, her account has been frozen until the case is settled by the courts. Frances is surprised when an Inspector Delaney pays her a visit. Evidently the police received an anonymous letter regarding Reggie’s demise and it points the finger at Frances. Lily gains several admirers at her first social event leaving Frances to figure out which one is suitable and who is just after Lily’s dowry. Frances learns that there is a thief attacking the homes of the wealthy and when a stolen item finds its way into her reticule, she sets out to discover the thief’s identity. Frances is in for a busy social season in A Lady’s Guide to Etiquette and Murder.A Lady’s Guide to Etiquette and Murder is a light, historical cozy mystery. The story begins in April of 1899 at Harleigh Manor. There is a similarity to Downton Abbey with the big estates, London society, and Frances is from a wealthy American family who married a titled British aristocrat. Frances is an interesting character. This is the first time she is on her own without her domineering mother or her husband. She comes across as a typical lady of that time-period. I would have preferred her to be a little more out of the box. Lily, on the other hand, is outspoken, headstrong, smart but naïve in the way of men (and the rules of British society). Aunt Hetty provides levity to the story. There is quite a bit going on in the story (as you can see from my summary). Despite the number of storylines, there is a lack of action. More time is spent drinking tea and discussing the various issues. I could have done with less speculation and repetition. The beginning of the book did engage my attention, but it began to wane after a while as the pace slows down. Dianne Freeman is an overly descriptive writer. Frances’ daily life is described in detail. The mysteries lacked development. It was not a challenge to identify the guilty parties especially for the burglaries. I liked that the author did not push the romance between George and Frances. The attraction is there between them, but Frances is not ready for a new romance. My rating for A Lady’s Guide to Etiquette and Murder is 3 out of 5 stars. If you enjoy light-hearted, historical cozy mysteries, then pick up the debut novel in A Countess of Harleigh Mystery series A Lady’s Guide to Etiquette and Murder.
  • (4/5)
    This was a delightful story.. It was fun, light & easy to read; some of the places & people mentioned were actually real & I could identify with that.Frances (one of those American rich débutantes that exchanged American money for British Title) is now a widow; her husband's mistress wakes Frances up in the middle of the night stating that she needs Frances's help moving Reggie's (dead) body out her bed & into the one he shared w/ Frances. Reggie, weighs too much, so Frances asks the only man at the house-party that has a modicum of discretion, George Hazleton (her best friend Fiona's brother), to help.After the official mourning period is over, Frances moves out of the family estate, into Belgravia and unwittingly next door to George Hazleton (whom she had hoped to never see again); much to the delight of both George & Fiona .Frances' sister, Lily & their Aunt Hetty, come to stay w/ Frances, in order for Lily to have her debut in London Society.Frances' brother-in-law is so angry about losing Frances' money, he files a claim against her personal account. (At that time in England, women could hold no property or, for the most part, bank accounts: All legally belonged to the husband, for his pleasure of disposal. In exchange a woman got a title and place in society).When Lily & Hetty come to London for the "season", there begins a rash of thefts from homes where society parties have been held... Each of the three gentlemen courting Lily were at those parties. While Frances, George, & Aunt Hetty investigate; the thefts, Lily's suitors, & Reggie's death (now a suspected poisoning) Frances becomes the target in a dangerous game of cat & mouse.The story was short, fun & easy to read; I liked the characters (even the murderer).... The historical setting was well described and felt authentic rather than pedantic.
  • (4/5)
    Frances Wynn, the widowed Countess of Harleigh, is nearing the end of her period of mourning. American-born and wed for her family fortune, Frances has decided that she will move away from her country estate and live in London, where she will not be as "controlled" by the family who want only her money. Her father, however, had arranged for her to have money of her own, and when her husband's heir discovers he hasn't full control, tempers flare. At the same time, Frances younger sister, Lily, arrives from America with their Aunt for a Season in London. Lily's suitors bring romance and mystery into their lives.Can Frances handle the gentleman callers and the issues that come with them while maintaining her standing in society?Fun, entertaining, characters were well-developed and story was interesting.
  • (5/5)
    Frances, Countess of Harleigh, moves her small household to London to escape the demands of her in-laws. Almost immediately, her life gets turned upside down when police approach her with questions about how her husband died, her younger sister arrives to be launched into society, her bank account is frozen from her brother-in-law attempting to claim her money, and a string of jewelry thefts happening all over society.I absolutely adored Frances. Her practical attitude in spite of whatever she faced won me over from the start. She took action for what she thought was right, but accepted the advice of those closest to her. The plot moved at a good pace, and the supporting characters were excellent at just that: supporting. I learned just enough of each one that I look forward to seeing each of them in future adventures of Frances...and a handsome, charming neighbor.This is an exceptional historical mystery, and I would recommend it to any reader.I received a free copy through NetGalley for reviewing purposes.
  • (5/5)
    A Lady’s Guide to Etiquette and Murder by Dianne FreemanBook #1: A Countess of Harleigh MysterySource: NetgalleyMy Rating: 4½/5 starsWhen you’re the Countess of Harleigh, even the widowed Countess of Harleigh there are certain things that are expected of you. You are expected to be a proper lady, you are expected to participate in society, and you’re expected to fully and financially support your extended family. You are not expected to refuse funding, you are not expected to leave the family estate, you’re not expected to live alone with just your young daughter, and you’re certainly not expected to get yourself involved in mystery. Frances Wynn, the widowed Countess of Harleigh has decided to live her life far differently as a widow than she did as a wife. As a wife, Frances tended to bury her head in the sand. Oh, she knew her husband was unfaithful, but she never expected to be confronted with it so bluntly and blatantly as the night he died in another woman’s bed. During her year of mourning, Frances made some serious decisions about her life: she was moving out of the estate home she shared with her dead husband, she would no longer indulge in her in-laws by allowing them to request more funds from her trust, and she would certainly never marry again. With her plans in place and a solicitor willing to work for her interests, Frances moves herself and her young daughter into a modest home in London. Unfortunately, the fresh start Frances was hoping for doesn’t quite work out according to her plans. Within hours of settling into her new home, her past comes calling! Only two other people know what really happened the night Frances’ husband died, and one of those two people is now her next-door neighbor, Mr. Hazelton. What’s more, the police have also come calling regarding the manner of her late husband’s death, there have been a series of robberies among her upper crust friends, her younger sister and aunt have come to stay for the duration of the Season, AND, her greedy brother-in-law has decided to sue for access the Frances’ money! As a proper lady of society, Frances should step away from all the scandal, all the drama and allow the proper authorities to sort it all out on her behalf. But, that’s not the type of woman Frances Wynn, Countess of Harleigh has decided she wants to be. With decisions made and a course set, Frances, with the help of her dogged aunt, Mr. Hazelton, her husband’s last mistress, and her best friend, begins asking questions and sussing out motives and motivations for the players in a most dangerous game. Though she isn’t a professional investigator, Frances is smart, curious, and has access to certain levels of society the police just can’t get to. The deeper Frances delves into the hearts and minds of men, the closer she gets to flushing out a killer, resolving nearly all her problems, and risking her own precious life. The Bottom Line: I have always liked books featuring women ahead of their time and place and the Countess of Harleigh certainly fits that description. Frances Wynn isn’t looking to cause scandal or be a scandal, but she is determined to live her life on her terms. What I particularly liked about Frances is her willingness to admit when she’s in over her head and needs help. Though she’s brazen and bold, she isn’t stupid and has no desire to leave her daughter alone in the world. As a result, Frances has surrounded herself with a whole host of interesting and loyal people which are going to make for fun reading in future installments of this historical cozy mystery series.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this story. Our heroine is awakened in the night by a guest, who it turns out is her husband’s mistress, and tells her that he’s had a heart attack and has died in bed and wants Frances to help her move the body back to his own room. They decide he’s too heavy and need help and go to another man’s room to ask his help. It’s not long before the police get a letter questioning natural causes or murder and Frances is the prime suspect. Quick, fun read.
  • (4/5)
    American-born Frances Wynn, Countess of Harleigh is finally done with mourning the man who was found dead in another woman's bed. She needs to get away from the new heir to the title and with her own funds she leaves for London. An anonymous letter implicating her in the murder of her husband leads her down a track of investigating the truth. Add in her sister and a dashing new neighbour, who knows the truth too and you have a fun read.I really enjoyed this one and I'm looking forward to reading more. Frances is well aware of the problems of society and keeping herself well regarded while also knowing that she wants some freedom. It's an interesting look at a turn of the 19th Century world of privilege.
  • (1/5)
    Sigh. I read the first chapter and couldn't make myself do a full Pearl-rule. For a novel set in 1899 the dialogue and internal thoughts were just too modern in their tone and the characterizations seemed to flip flop within the same chapter (evil in-laws, except protagonist is also super sympathetic and maybe they're not so evil...). The writing isn't bad, just mediocre and I know there's better things out there so I'm moving on to better reading pastures.