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Animal Dreams: A Novel

Animal Dreams: A Novel

Написано Barbara Kingsolver

Озвучено Barbara Kingsolver


Animal Dreams: A Novel

Написано Barbara Kingsolver

Озвучено Barbara Kingsolver

оценки:
4.5/5 (56 оценки)
Длина:
11 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
Jul 24, 2018
ISBN:
9780062682734
Формат:
Аудиокнига

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Описание

From Barbara Kingsolver, the acclaimed author of Flight Behavior, The Lacuna, The Bean Trees, and other modern classics, Animal Dreams is a passionate and complex novel about love, forgiveness, and one woman's struggle to find her place in the world.

At the end of her rope, Codi Noline returns to her Arizona home to face her ailing father, with whom she has a difficult, distant relationship. There she meets handsome Apache trainman Loyd Peregrina, who tells her, "If you want sweet dreams, you've got to live a sweet life."

Filled with lyrical writing, Native American legends, a tender love story, and Codi's quest for identity, Animal Dreams is literary fiction at it's very best.

This edition includes a P.S. section with additional insights from Barbara Kingsolver, background material, suggestions for further reading, and more.

Издатель:
Издано:
Jul 24, 2018
ISBN:
9780062682734
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Также доступно как...

Также доступно как книгеКниге

Об авторе

Barbara Kingsolver is the author of nine bestselling works of fiction, including the novels, Flight Behavior, The Lacuna, The Poisonwood Bible, Animal Dreams, and The Bean Trees, as well as books of poetry, essays, and creative nonfiction. Her work of narrative nonfiction is the enormously influential bestseller Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life. Kingsolver’s work has been translated into more than twenty languages and has earned literary awards and a devoted readership at home and abroad. She was awarded the National Humanities Medal, our country’s highest honor for service through the arts, as well as the prestigious Dayton Literary Peace Prize for her body of work. She lives with her family on a farm in southern Appalachia.


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4.5
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    Amazing book. Refugees and issues with destruction of countries has not changed in 30 years. She writes good books
  • (4/5)
    I always enjoy Kingsolver's work, and this book was no exception. I love the town of Grace, and had a hard time understanding why Codi would want to leave it!
  • (4/5)
    I wanted to like this book more than I did, but I found the protagonist a bit off-putting, constantly pushing aside the people who loved her. Still, her encounters with the Indians she lived near, and with her Native American boyfriend were filled with wisdom and respect for the earth.
  • (5/5)
    Codi Noline has spent her whole life feeling that she didn't belong, first at the urging of her father, and then at her own insistence. When she comes home to Grace, Arizona after her sister Hallie moves to Nicaragua (not to "save the world," but to follow what she hopes for - the "possibility that kids might one day grow up to be neihther the destroyers nor the destroyed"), she slips into her old, comfortable role of outsider. This story is about Codi finding out that she belongs.I was quickly caught up in this story, and especially touched by the relationship between Codi and her father, described most eloquently with small intervals written in his point of view. Kingsolver succeeded in making Grace a real place that I could see in my own mind's eye, and understand as though I'd been there myself. There are several key relationship stories told in this novel - each has a role in bringing the main character to her new enlightenment.There is real tragedy in this story, and the sadness it made me feel overwhelmed the positive. I'm not sure that was the intention of the author, but it serves to me as a reminder that we all need to take responsibility for our relationships with our loved ones and with our surroundings. Well done.
  • (5/5)
    This is a true gem of a story. While I followed along with the story of Codi I found myself looking at my own life and what truth means to each individual. It is a woven embroidery of love, family, faith, truth, mystery, and so much more. It is captivating and inspiring. The main character Codi Noline takes an odyssey to find herself when she returns to her hometown Grace, Arizona and finds that she never had to go so far away to find the answers that she had longed for. Kingsolver does not disappoint.
  • (4/5)
    Barbara Kingsolver has become a favourite author. Her technique of weaving a story that many others can relate to is fascinating. The book contains themes of the land, family, and searching for a place to make a contribution.Some people drift through their lives never stopping to examine the important things that surround them. Kingsolver can make you stop and look at what is around you and make a connection that you never saw before.I recommend this book to all those readers that never feel they are a part of the community. It makes you look a events, dreams and relationships in a new awakening way.
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book a lot. I was originally put off by reading that it was a book with a "political" story. Sure, it has political implications, but it's primarily a book about personal relationships, like Kingsolver's other books (the ones I've read, anyway). There are, however, multiple levels in the story, and the reader can choose to focus on the aspect which holds most interest. I found the father-daughter relationship to be of particular interest, because I am an aging, decaying father myself, but all the characters seemed quite real to me, notwithstanding the fact that I know nothing about native americans.
  • (4/5)
    This book has these amazing little tidbits of wisdom thrown into it. You could read it as fiction and ignore its lessons but you would be missing out, so don't. Read it as guidance. You'll get more out of it.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoy Kinsolver's descriptions of Arizona but the main character, Condi, just kept on getting the in the way of the scenery. I never grew to care about her past or her tough life or her inability to fit in. She spends the entire book wining and feeling sorry for herself when much of her trouble is of her own making!
  • (4/5)
    I cried at the end!
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful story, typical Kingsolver.
  • (4/5)
    I very much enjoyed this book, but do not feel that I need to keep it with me. When I read it, I thought that the central issue was Codi's feelings of being disconnected. She never "nests" (creates a home atmosphere), she wanders from job to job never even intending to stay in most of them, and she's spent years living with someone with whom she feels no real connection. Her feelings of being disconnected begin with her relation to the town- her father felt disconnected for being part of the "bad" family below everyone else, so he tried to reverse it for his daughters, whom he told were above everyone else. This resulted in their feeling as disconnected as him, but in different ways. Another thing that contributes to Codi's feelings of disconnectedness is her miscarriage- she loses that thing she was connected to- the baby. The baby is also the product of one of the few connections she made in the town, to Lloyd, and losing it meant losing a link to him, a link to the outside, and a part of herself. Throughout all this she feels too isolated from everyone to even talk about her experience. The kind of experience she has had- a teenage prenancy- contributes to the problem. This is something that girls (especially special girls as she has been told she is) are not supposed to have. It is something that no one wants to talk about, and the fact that it has happened becomes one more brick in her barrier.Her experience throughout the book is one of understanding her disconnection and reestablishing her connection. She reestablishes her connections when she takes an active interest in the town, gets to know people, and generally becomes involved. Finding the stones at the cemetary, the pictures of her and her sister, and putting the pieces together that her family is actually part of the town are equally important. Finally, establishing a meaningful, close relationship with Lloyd, multiple members of the town, and her father allows her to share the experience of her miscarriage with others. In the end she doesn't get on the plane to Colerado because she has finally found a home.
  • (5/5)
    It's been a long time since I read this book but when I did I remember putting it in my top ten. I'll have to re-read it soon.
  • (4/5)
    Definitely not my favorite Kingsolver book, but good none the less. Perhaps I didn't enjoy it as much because I couldn't relate to the lost soul that is Codi.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book! There is something about the descriptions of the heart and the liver...I wrote in my copy and keep going back and rereading my favorite parts.
  • (4/5)
    I read this on a spring break trip in Florida. I loved the relationship between the two sisters. It was my first introduction to Kingsolver who quickly became one of my favorite authors.
  • (4/5)
    The book was given to me by a dear friend who believed it would touch my soul and she was so correct! I cried at the end of the book because the characters of Codi and the entire town of Grace, AZ became my faux neighbors. Life in a small town where the majority of the population can trace their lineage back to a family of sisters who traveled from Spain to marry is way too confining for Codi and her Sister Halle who were outsiders and motherless. They were strangers in a strange land.Codi has been running from the town of Grace since the day she left for college but now her father, Doc Homer needs her. Codi takes a job as a science teacher to be close to her father who is fighting dementia. The reader is swept into this novel of soul touching emotions by the characters and the landscape of Arizona. I have the opportunity to travel to Arizona and even attended a wedding on a Native America reserve but never truly knew the history and traditions of the native americans of this state. Discovering the traditions of another culture be it in the United States or a foreign country makes a fascinating read for this LibraryThing member. I find it extremely difficult to comprehend why readers found this book boring because it was complex, witty and full of love of the land and the human spirit.
  • (4/5)
    This book was captivating. Kingsolver has a rare gift of painting emotion with every word. She does not spend pages writing detailed descriptions of a character's face; she spends a novel intertwining characters personalities. You can feel the passion, the heavy sadness; you can see the world in which this story lives. She wrote so beautifully of Native American life, modern city life, loss in many ways (loss of body, mind, feeling, family) but also of gaining all those things back in a true-to-life format.

    I could not put this book down. It is the story of Cosima [Codi] returning to her small, environmentally-threatened town of Grace, Arizona. Where she must deal with her distant father's worsening Alzheimer's, seeing the high-school sweetheart whose baby she miscarried without his knowledge and confront the rush of long-lost memories of childhood that consume her. It is the story of loss, of re-discovering a place she thought was lost to her, family secrets coming to light..

    The story is also told through the eyes of Cosima's ailing father, Homero. His sections are brief but poetic, beautifully pained, delicate and encompassing.


    Favorite quotes of the book:

    1). "You don't ask questions of an attic"

    2.) "[...] There was a roaring in my ears and I lost track of what they were saying. I believe it was the physical manifestation of unbearable grief."

    3). "The flowers were beaten down, their bent-over heads bejeweled with diamond droplets like earring on sad, rich widows"
  • (4/5)
    Typically for Kingsolver, this story wraps characters around environmental and related political issues. In this Cosima returns to her home town, planning to stay for a year working as the science teacher. She discovers that the river running through the town has been polluted by the mine, which dominates the town's economy. It is not Cosima alone who fights this battle. Charmingly, the local woman create their peacock feather pinatas and sell them as art work to fund a fight against the industrial powers. In the meanwhile, Cosima struggles in a relationship with her a Native American man who she had known in high school, with her aging domineering doctor father, and with concern for her sister, who has ventured off to Nicaragua to help the indigenous people survive in the midst of civil war.Overall, this is somewhat easier reading than some of Kingsolver's other books and a bit less polemic than Prodigal Summer.
  • (4/5)
    August 2008 COTC Book Club selection.

    So sad, yet I wanted to know these people, these characters; I wanted to see the small town of Grace. Kingsolver's passion for the earth and for peace really shine through in this novel. I kept waiting for Codi to wake up and realize that she actually had it pretty great - a fabulous friend in Emelina, a new family in Loyd and his family, a meaningful job, a community she could care about and love. Not that these things could ever replace those she lost, but they make the loss far more bearable. Barbara Kingsolver really does amazing things with words.
  • (5/5)
    Utterly, utterly FANTASTIC! This novel nearly knocks The Poisonwood Bible from it's number one spot on my Kingsolver list of favorites! I was pleasantly surprised with how simply erotic and insanely interesting this novel is. I would read it again in a heart beat. If this is the only book of Barbara's that you pick up, you won't be disappointed!
  • (4/5)
    Codi is a great character, full of contradictions and confusion.
  • (5/5)
    I connected with Animal Dreams so fast, so easily. It seemed as if the author knew me, and chose the right words to speak through her lead character. One of my very favorite books.
  • (4/5)
    Still my favourite of all her books, with Prodigal Summer and The Bean Trees coming in a close second. Love the heroine, love her father, and adore the romantic hero. My kind of guy.
  • (5/5)
    This was an amazing book about a woman who's been skating through life without really knowing what she wants out of it, and who's searching for her soul without knowing she's doing so. Her journey was amazing and it was thrilling to share it to such a wonderful end.
  • (5/5)
    An excellent immersion into place and character. It explores the struggle of Codi to find a home and meaning to her life against the struggles of her father dealing with Alzheimer's and their home town's fight with the mining company.
  • (3/5)
    Short stories from one of my favorite authors. I didn't like this as well as her novels.
  • (2/5)
    Codi returns to her hometown and has all the usual emotions and realizations. And she meets a hot Native American man who guides her spirit and has hot sex with her. And I believe she solves some sort of environmental mystery. Wish-fullfillment drek cloaked in "magical realism". Why was this assigned in high school?
  • (5/5)
    This is a wonderful book. It does what many stories try to do: it simply tells a person's life, a snippet of time in the grand scheme of things, and in the process touches on some larger truth. Something that helps a reader with a new perspective, a new thing to think about. Many stories try to do this. Most fail to do it thoroughly.But Animal Dreams does it. It is pierced through with sorrow and love and loss and growth, all wrapped up in one special town that most see as a place to move from. Many have left Grace; few return. And yet Codi comes back, the prodigal daughter, suitcase heavy with fear, alienation, loneliness, and aimlessness. She is un-rooted, and tugged by memories she can and cannot remember. This is a story of finding oneself, of coming together inside your own skin. Of becoming. Codi holds most of the pages, but some of the most devastating passages are from the few chapters told from her father's point of view. He is how she could be. How we all can be, if we feel but don't let it out, if we hide behind histories long past but still capable of wounding.My favorite paragraph: "...people's dreams are made out of what they do all day. The same way a dog that runs after rabbits will dream of rabbits. It's what you do that makes your soul, not the other way around."I'll be reading more Kingsolver.
  • (5/5)
    An all-time favorite!