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New Kid

New Kid

Автором Jerry Craft

Озвучено Jesus Del Orden, Nile Bullock и Dan Bittner


New Kid

Автором Jerry Craft

Озвучено Jesus Del Orden, Nile Bullock и Dan Bittner

оценки:
4.5/5 (199 оценки)
Длина:
1 hour
Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 5, 2019
ISBN:
9780062885326
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Примечание редактора

Newbery Medal…

“New Kid” by Jerry Craft won the 2020 Newbery Medal, which honors “the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.” It’s hard being the new kid anywhere, but it’s particularly difficult when you’re one of the few people of color at your new school. This audiobook adaption of the original graphic novel features a full cast.

Описание

An original full-cast audio adaptation of the graphic novel from award-winning author-illustrator Jerry Craft, performed by the author with: Jesus Del Orden, Nile Bullock, Robin Miles, Guy Lockard, Peyton Lusk, Rebecca Soler, Dan Bittner, Phoebe Strole, Marc Thompson, Miles Harvey, and Ron Butler.

Perfect for fans of Raina Telgemeier and Gene Luen Yang, New Kid is a timely, honest novel about starting over at a new school where diversity is low and the struggle to fit in is real, from award-winning author-illustrator Jerry Craft.

Seventh-grader Jordan Banks loves nothing more than drawing cartoons about his life. But instead of sending him to the art school of his dreams, his parents enroll him in a prestigious private school known for its academics, where Jordan is one of the few kids of color in his entire grade.

As he makes the daily trip from his Washington Heights apartment to the upscale Riverdale Academy Day School, Jordan soon finds himself torn between two worlds — and not really fitting into either one.

Can Jordan learn to navigate his new school culture while keeping his neighborhood friends and staying true to himself?

Filled with sound effects and original music, this audio adventure is one the whole family will enjoy.

Издатель:
Издано:
Feb 5, 2019
ISBN:
9780062885326
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Jerry Craft, rancher and former mayor of Jacksboro, Texas, was also a pioneer in the national cable television industry. He lives in Jacksboro and operates ranches in Texas and New Mexico.

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Обзоры

Что люди думают о New Kid

4.6
199 оценки / 33 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    I’m trying to read more graphic novels; this is a graphic novel about being the new kid although it really reaches beyond that feeling.One of my favorite parts of this book is Jordan’s trip from home to school. Jordan goes to a mostly white school and has to take public transportation from his neighborhood (mostly black) to where his school is. He begins with hoodie and looking tough; by the time he gets to school, he looks like a “good” kid. He has to look the part for where he is. On his first day, Jordan has a mentor, Liam, who seems a little distant at first, but they grow to be friends. The main idea is that everyone feels singled out at times and wants to avoid being judged. As nice as Liam has it, he has his own problems that he wants to hide. Their friendship progresses as the novel progresses.Being black in a mostly white school has challenges. One kid is constantly called by a more “ethnic” name instead of his real name. Some of the black kids are treated with less patience and prejudice in that the assumption is the black kid did it, so to speak. Sometimes the characters are so quick to believe in prejudice that they are humbled when there is no prejudice--just perceived because they are assuming others have assumptions about black people.The novel begins with Jordan’s first day at his new school and ends at the end of the school year. I enjoyed it. It’s easy to read and has a positive message to not make assumptions about people. Most people want friends and just want to fit in. You’ll even see this dynamic with the adults. You’ll enjoy reading this one--it will appeal to everyone.
  • (5/5)
    Jordan, a twelve-year-old artist, would love to go to art school, but instead his parents enroll him in a private school with top-notch academics. Jordan finds that he's one of only a few kids of color in the seventh grade at his new school in New Kid by author Jerry Craft.Yes. I picked this graphic novel up because of the race/diversity issue it addresses. Yes, it resonated with me in a number of places on that score, such as in a section of Jordan's sketchbook labeled "Judging Kids by the Covers of Their Books!" Jordan's view of mainstream books for kids versus African American books for kids—good gravy. He could've grabbed that right out of my brain.Even so, this novel doesn't get caught up in being so issue-y that it ceases to be entertaining, accessible, and inclusive. It's a three-dimensional story that takes a look at more than one viewpoint and has much that any "new" or different person can relate to, both within and beyond schooldays and childhood/adolescence.Jordan's story strikes a balance between the downright hilarious parts and parts that can prick your heart or make your stomach drop. It packs in both obvious and understated genius, and what it simply leaves up to the reader's perception and observation is as real as what it says through the characters' speech and thought bubbles. It's not a story that magically solves every character's every problem, but it still wraps up in a way that's inspiring and satisfying.And did I mention how hilarious the novel is? I did?It'd be hard not to take away something awesome from a book like this.
  • (5/5)
    Jordan is beginning middle school at a new elite academy outside of his neighborhood, when all he wants to do is go to art school. His new school isn't so bad, except that he is one of a handful of African-American kids who go there and the other students (and even teachers) can't stop reminding him of this. Can Jordan fit in or will he always feel like the "new kid"?This is an excellent read for kids in the middle grades. While not all readers will have the same exact situation as Jordan, many will likely identify with the feeling of trying to fit in to new situations or wearing a different aspect of their personality depending on the context (as Jordan does when he's at school versus when he spends time in his neighborhood). There are many snappy jokes and pop culture references that kids are sure to love, although it might make this book seem dated kind of fast (time will tell). The graphic novel format is perfect for the story of a kid who loves drawing.
  • (3/5)
    New Kid by Jerry Craft is a middle grade graphic novel that tells the story of a boy named Jordan who has (against his will) been enrolled in a prestigious private school in the upscale (and predominantly white) neighborhood of Riverdale. While he didn't necessarily feel like he fit in among his peers at his old school in Washington Heights he really feels like the outsider at this school being one of only 3 students of color. (There's a lot of mixing up of names by the teachers + bullying by peers.) In classic 'rebellious preteen' fashion he feels that the world (i.e. good ol' mom) is set on ruining his life because she won't let him go to art school instead of this place where it seems like everyone is either rich, white, or both. To help him sort through his frustrations and rage he takes to working on a sketchbook detailing his experiences. [A/N:These comics are interspersed throughout the book.] New Kid is a coming of age story about classism, racism, and finding out where you truly belong. Honesty compels me to tell you that I didn't necessarily love this book because of its predictability and slow moving pace. However, this book wasn't written with me in mind as its audience and therefore I think for the young person who is feeling 'other' and beaten down by circumstances out of their control this could be quite an important book. I liked the illustrative style particularly how it worked so well with the sprinkling of Jordan's comics with their very different artistic approach so no complaints on that front. For me it's a 4/10 but in terms of readability for that audience I'd say 8/10.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing shortstory. Completely different writing style, greatly narrated an highly enjoyable!
  • (5/5)
    Great book. I found it very funny and better than my expectations
  • (5/5)
    Amazing character development, and a great story of how a new kid gets more comfortable with the people and the way that the school is working. 10/10 (also I love the subtle reminders of what else is going on in the school)
  • (4/5)
    I’ve read the book I love it! I’m sorry can’t listen cause I already know.??
  • (4/5)
    Ну так себе, на пару раз прочесть. Хотя может кому и понравится, не спорю, но не мой стиль
  • (5/5)
    Everything was good a about it . .. . .
  • (5/5)
    A-maze-ing ! Awesome story! Enjoyed it a very much! ?
  • (5/5)
    i loved it so much beacase im my moms kid and she said i would probably like it
  • (5/5)
    I loved this story!!!!! Can’t wait for the next. ♥️
  • (5/5)
    It keep my attention all the way to the end.
    Awesome.
  • (5/5)
    Middle school can be a difficult time for some, and moving does not help the stress at all. This book is all about going from something completely familiar to something totally different. I rate this book 5 stars because even though all of my students may have never been considered the "new kid", I can have them put themselves in a "new kids" shoes and write about what their challenges could be.
  • (5/5)
    Jordan is the new kid at his middle school, and if that weren't hard enough, it's a fancy, rich-kid school and he's a non-white-skinned scholarship student. The story takes up through how Jordan negotiates this new, strange, and sometimes-frustrating space, making friends, standing up to bullies (both among the students and the staff), and making his own space within it all. It's brilliantly done. I mean, so much so that *every* kiddo should be reading it. The pictures of middle school life, and of everyday racism, drawn here are realistic and all the more brain-and soul-shaking for being undramatic. I'm so happy that Craft won the Newbery for it, and I hope it gets into as many young hands as possible.
  • (5/5)
    Jordan Banks starts a new year at a new school, a prep school where he's one of the few non-white kids.This graphic novel has been getting a lot of love, but I managed not to hear about it until after it won the Newbery and Coretta Scott King Awards this year. It. is. FABULOUS. Each chapter moves you along over the course of a school year, and its title plays on that of a book or movie from pop culture. We're also given glimpses of Jordan's sketchbook, as he draws about life at home and school. His parents and Grandpa make an appearance, he makes friends at the school, and you also see the racism and microaggressions he endures. It captures the real life of school and manages to be fairly upbeat - I laughed aloud a couple of times - and I was smiling in the end.
  • (5/5)
    Jordan attends a new private school at his mother’s insistence because of the opportunities he will have. He would rather attend art school. Jordan is one of the few black kids at school and while adjusting to his new surroundings, he deals with the slings and arrows of teachers’ microaggressions and bullying by a classmate. An important and highly accessible book that has longevity; readers of color from 5th grade through college will find lots to recognize here.
  • (4/5)
    Jordan struggles to fit in at a fancy uptown school. His guide- Liam advises him to not judge him, and shows him the ropes as Jordan and a few others of color face acts of microaggression each day. Jordan would much rather go to art school and spends his free time drawing comics, but what parent could turn down a chance to get their child into a prestigious school? This Newbery award winner would make for a good book discussion for grades 4-7.
  • (5/5)
    Jordan Banks loves to draw. He hopes that his parents will send him to art school. But they have other plans for him. He’s a bright kid, and they’ve secured a scholarship for him at a prestigious private middle school for him. And it’s only a bus ride away. As an African American, Jordan fears he’s going to feel isolated in an all white environment. When he arrives at Riverdale Academy Day School, he discovers that’s not quite the case, there are a few other students and teachers of color. The real social divide is between the affluent students who spend their school vacations in Hawaii and those on financial aid. Yet, in spite of this and the universal middle school divisions between cliques of cool kids and those who are varying degrees of less cool, cultural misperceptions and faux pas, friendships form that cross these social divisions. In addition to great storytelling and art, Craft excels in recording the intersectionality of economic class, private school, and middle grade life. While it can often be frustrating and awkward, there are times when you can truly bond playing video games together, and instances of true vulnerability, honesty and friendship.
  • (5/5)
    First graphic novel to win the Newbery and well-deserved! This book will win over anyone undecided as to the value of graphic novels. It's about starting a new school away from your neighborhood, feeling out of place, old friends vs. new, family dynamics, the nuances of racism, misinterpretations, setting people straight, and understanding that you can't set everyone straight. Jordan's 7th grade voice comes through clearly; sometimes my heart broke for him and sometimes his viewpoint made me laugh. A fabulous addition to my grade 4/5 school library and also great for middle school, high school, and adults.
  • (5/5)
    When Jared starts school at an exclusive academy, he has to code-switch through the neighborhoods to travel to school and find a place where he fits in a school where he feels out of place. He and other black students notice they are treated differently. He slowly makes friends, figures out how to start to bring different parts of his life together, and work with his parents to embrace opportunity. A graphic novel with likeable characters, interesting art, and that raises some heavy issues of what it is like to be new, fit in, and the way being new can mean being transformed.
  • (5/5)
    This book deserves all the love it has been getting. Last Monday it was officially the first Graphic Novel to win the Newbery award for the best book written for young readers. Jordan Banks really wants to be an artist, but his parents want him to learn to live in the “white” world. How to code switch, the norms of society for the upper crust that they don’t teach in the “black” school. So he is one of the new kids at this elite prep school and things are very different. There is more homework and the classes are harder. There are other black kids at school but not many, and white privilege is everywhere. Between the teacher that can not be bothered to call him by his name, and the students who call him Oreo, it is a new life that is hard to fit into. This book is so nuanced. From how it shows multiple kids not fitting in, to how it talks about wealth and “financial aid”, to even the dynamics around race and differences. It covers a lot of weighty subjects in a manner that is easy to understand. It also has you questioning the small things in life that affect a POC in a different way than others. This book was FANTASTIC. I can not wait to see what the author does next.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic book touching on racism, microaggressions in a way kids can understand.
  • (5/5)
    great book for all ages. good for kids that are new to a school
  • (5/5)
    it was so amazing!!!!!!!
    I loved it!!!!!!!!
    best book ever!!!!!!
  • (5/5)
    It is such a great book super funny ?
  • (4/5)
    My first time finishing an audiobook and this is a good start. I like the story. ♡
  • (5/5)
    Perfect for a quick read! Definitely going to buy the physical copy to put on my shelf for the kids to read.
  • (3/5)
    This is definitely targeted at younger readers, but I still bet I learned more from this story of minority kids at a predominately white NYC private school about implicit bias, microaggressions, and racism than I will from the official training I have to take at my job next week. It's a bit slow as the story is paced to last the entire school year, and I'm not sure the chapter titles punning on movie titles really added much, but the scathing points hidden in the gentle humor make it all worthwhile.