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Nocturna

Nocturna

Написано Maya Motayne

Озвучено Kyla Garcia


Nocturna

Написано Maya Motayne

Озвучено Kyla Garcia

оценки:
3.5/5 (104 оценки)
Длина:
14 hours
Издатель:
Издано:
May 7, 2019
ISBN:
9780062911117
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

The first in a sweeping and epic own-voices debut fantasy trilogy — set in a stunning Latinx-inspired world — about a face-changing thief and a risk-taking prince who must team up to defeat a powerful evil they accidentally unleashed. Perfect for fans of Tomi Adeyemi, Leigh Bardugo, and V. E. Schwab.

To Finn Voy, magic is two things: a knife to hold under the chin of anyone who crosses her...and a disguise she shrugs on as easily as others pull on cloaks.

As a talented face-shifter, it’s been years since Finn has seen her own face, and that’s exactly how she likes it. But when Finn gets caught by a powerful mobster, she’s forced into an impossible mission: steal a legendary treasure from Castallan’s royal palace or be stripped of her magic forever.

After the murder of his older brother, Prince Alfehr is first in line for the Castallan throne. But Alfie can’t help but feel he will never live up to his brother’s legacy. Riddled with grief, Alfie is obsessed with finding a way to bring his brother back, even if it means dabbling in forbidden magic.

But when Finn's and Alfie’s fates collide, they accidentally unlock a terrible, ancient power — which, if not contained, will devour the world. With Castallan’s fate in their hands, Alfie and Finn must race to vanquish what they have unleashed, even if it means facing the deepest darkness in their pasts.

Издатель:
Издано:
May 7, 2019
ISBN:
9780062911117
Формат:
Аудиокнига


Об авторе

Maya Motayne decided to be a writer when she was four years old and hasn’t stopped writing since. Her first novel, Nocturna, was a Los Angeles Times bestseller as well as a #1 Sunday Times bestseller. Maya lives in New York City, where she pursues her passions of petting as many dogs as possible and buying purses based on whether they can fit a big book in them. To learn more about Maya, visit her website at mayamotayne.com.

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Что люди думают о Nocturna

3.6
104 оценки / 180 Обзоры
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Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    So creepy and good... must get the rest of the series
  • (4/5)
    Honestly, I don`t understand some people`s arguments against this book. Is it from the most original idea ever? Of course not. Does it have four dimensional detailed to the last minor part of their souls. Hell, no. But let me remind everybody that Stephen King`s best books were born from an old, who-knows-how-many-times-used idea after King has written them WELL. And this is a well written book as well. Good characters, fast paced and interesting storyline, what else do you need? Well, a better hungarian editor would have been nice...
  • (3/5)
    I was pleasantly surprised by this book. It told an interesting story and was still a fast read. I've read that some don't like the changes to the vampire myth that Del Toro and Hogan made but I thought they worked.

    My only gripe is there is a scene near the end that is a little too much like a scene in Blade 2 (also done by Del Toro). But overall very enjoyable, and I look forward to the next ones.
  • (3/5)
    This book is all kinds of dumb, but when it works, it really works. Some of the early scene-setting moments are fantastic, and the "getting the team together" moments crackle. The action feels so by-the-books, though, and the prose is...it's not bad, but it's sometimes too punchy.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book. Honestly I can't tell you how I came about reading this and I didn't even bother to read the back cover when I got it. So the first chunk of the book I kept thinking that it was some kind of Twilight Zone episode but I kept me interested the whole way through. They went into ALOT of detail on the airplane mechanics, the medical side of the change from human to vampire and even the behavior of city rats. They gave me enough detail to understand what was going on but not so much as to bore me with all the terminology and over the top details. They gave a good back story and a good lead out into the next book. If your a fan of vampire books and want something not in the usual realm of sparkles and charm, this is the book. It gets down to the nitty gritty animalistic side that vampires, if real I believe they, would have.
  • (4/5)
    Guillermo del Toro's The Strain is absolutely fantastic. This is the first book in the series, and I cannot wait to read the rest. These are vampires that do not sparkle, but are true to the traditional vampire lore in that they are creatures to be feared and fought. In Toro's book they are a plague upon this earth, terrifying to behold, and cannot be easily destroyed. The motley vampire-hunting team of Abraham Setrakian, Ephraim Goodweather, Nora Martinez, and Vasiliy Fet might be New York's only chance of defeating the Dark One even as his "turned" hordes grow exponentially. Although the book reads like a horror film, there are no cheesy one-liners, no unrealistic hero with divine weapons or powers, no hope for survival save for what humanity's basic instincts can provide. Honestly, the zombie apocalypse would be preferable to the one del Toro describes, the odds are that grim indeed. But not only does this book have an intense plot, but the characters are brave, vulnerable, desperate, intelligent, all from different walks of life, and the reader can't help but become attached to every single one of them. This is the perfect read for someone who enjoys great horror literature, and doesn't want to stoop to teenage drama novels or cliche gore-filled comic books to find it.
  • (4/5)
    This realistic, dark tale is one I can see being perfectly suited to the large scale (as you would expect from Del Toro). Indeed the early opening sequences involving the plane evoke a sweeping & terse mental cinematographic show. This is an interesting scientifically bent story of truly horrible vampires that no amount of teen fantasy writers could romanticize. So it was fast moving, tense & mostly original yet I found that I didn't love the story quite as much as I was expecting to.... when thinking about why I realized it's because I was anticipating this book because of Del Toro. I loved the atmosphere he infuses into his movies that manages to overlay reality with just a touch of holding your breath just slightly wonder (Pan's labyrinth, Hellboy, the Orphanage). There's always a trace of something magical (for lack of a better word) smoothing the rough edges of the usually gritty & environs in which his characters find themselves.For me, this was missing from this story which means I just wasn't as in love with the book as most other readers.However- it is an absolutely stand-out unique novel compared to many others in the genre that had no pacing issues. I also look forward to following along with this tale over the upcoming books in the trilogy.
  • (3/5)
    Meh. This book starts strong, coasts into fillerville and ends with a double shot of I just don't give a crap anymore. An impressive feat of mediocrity seeing as how it features the gnarliest vampires I've come across in any story. I think it's the first book I've read where I spent a notable amount of time mentally chiding characters for doing stupid things to drive the plot.I love you Guillermo, but you book is as forgettable as your movies are memorable.
  • (2/5)
    I was really disappointed, as a fan of Guillermo del Toro, as a fan of Vampire stories.Here's why. The Strain reads like a series of cliches. The initial confusion/denial of what is being dealt with, the strong, flawed hero- a macho man, The Master vamp- big and black and seething evil, and the old man they turn to for help who knows all about vampires.The one non-cliche turned out to make the vampires ridiculous: A growth that shoots out from a vamp, like a tongue to feed on their prey. I guess this is supposed to be scary? But I kept thinking of a frog's tongue snapping out to get flies, which in my world isn't scary at all.The other "change" the writers make is the CSI type stuff which they drop about halfway through the novel...maybe because they weren't able to make it make sense? They claim these vampires are a virus, which means there could be a cure right? SO instead of following where the writer initially set it up to go, they do the same old thing- kill vamps, and by the end the writers are calling them demons although in this book holy water, crosses, garlic, and stakes to the heart aren't the way to kill these vamps. (changing what weapons kill vampires and saying the legends get it all wrong also qualifies as a cliche)And worst of all, I wasn't scared once.If you are looking for a good vampire novel, read to Salem's Lot, which everyone has copied, including this book.
  • (4/5)
    I love good horror and nasty vampires and The Strain fit that bill totally. When I read a vampire book I prefer them to be of the "real" kind. The vampires in The Strain are in no way the pretty boy Twilight kind. This book pulls you right in and you need to hold on tight because it is a bumpy ride to be sure. The audio version was narrated by Ron Perlman, you may remember him from Beauty and the Beast, he was Beast. I believe he was also Hell Boy. He has the perfect voice for this story and listening to him made the story even more creepy.I look forward to the next book of the trilogy. I can't make up my mind whether to read it or wait for the audio IF Ron Perlman narrates again.Like being scared? Creeped out? Real blood dripping vampires? Pick up The Strain if you dare....:)
  • (3/5)
    This book felt like a Koonz/King beach book to me. This was surprising given the fact that Guillermo del Toro wrote it. The writing was only slightly above the level of any other horror thriller and the story did nothing to impress me. I expected too much from del Toro I suppose and might have enjoyed it more if I were to let go of those expectations. I may pick up and read the sequel in the future but it will be purely for a mindless entertaining read.
  • (5/5)
    What can I say. This book left me breathless. Everytime I put it down I couldn't wait to pick it back up. The cover said "....Bram Stoker meets Stephen King meets Michael Crichton...." I agree only if it is the early Stephen King stuff like Salem's Lot before he got so commercial. I can't wait to get to the other two books of the series. Luckily for me I bought them all together because it looked so intriguing. Definitely not for Edward fans but I must for those of us that don't mind some science and no romance mixed in with our vampires, not to mention missing a little sleep due to reading.
  • (5/5)
    This was a highly enjoyable book to read. Like Guillermo del Toro's movies (Pan's Labyrinth and Hellboy) the vision is very definite. The author knows exactly what he wants to portray. The vampires from The Strain are not anything like Stephenie Meyer's cuddly vegetarians. These vampires are very real and VERY dangerous. The scenes that the authors depict are clearly thought out and are easily pictured. The actions (albeit a work of fantasy) are believable and the characters are relatively true to life.The authors offer backstory from World War II and connect our villain to atrocities at the extermination camp at Treblinka.If you enjoyed Richard Matheson's "I Am Legend" you MUST read The Strain.I anxiously away the 2nd and 3rd installments!
  • (3/5)
    I think I would have liked this a lot more if it weren't for Ron Perlman's horrible monotone narration. Seriously - I like the guy as an actor alright but he leaves much to be desired in the audiobook narration department. As far as the story goes, it was definitely engaging - and it played out like a movie in my mind. I wonder if Guillermo will make a film of this trilogy! I'd love to see it.
  • (3/5)
    An entertaining read, but better as a TV show.
  • (2/5)
    UPDATED : Finally got this from the library and finished it off. It was interesting and proposes a new, scientific approach to vampire legend, yet rambled and some of the events jumped around in a way that made it feel like a movie that had too many scenes cut out. I'll probably give it another chance and pick up the next one, just because I'm a vampire junkie, yet I can't REALLY recommend this book unless you've got some time to kill on a plane or something.(old notes)Mr. Burns peed on this book so I had to pitch it. Apparently he's sick of all the vamp media I've been involved in lately (just finished True Blood season 1, and have been watching Being Human on BBC America). Anyways, this one got sidelined : glad it wasn't a library book!!
  • (5/5)
    Managed to get an ARC copy of this and I was not disappointed. I'm now chomping at the bit for the next two books in the series.I've never really heard of such a great take on the vampire myth before. I mean, the idea of a virus, but bringing in the CDC? Brilliant.Del Toro, as a visionary, has done it again. And Hogan helped capture his vision. Absolutely wonderful.
  • (4/5)
    What is not to love? Vampires taking over the world and only a few brave people to stop it. Pure awesomeness.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful just doesn't describe this book good enough! A great combo of medical details, meet thriller, meet vampire and detective . . .once I started it I couldn't put it down. Be sure to have the second book in hand before you finish the first though.
  • (5/5)
    Yes! Vampires the way they should be! Monsters! The Master vampire was terrifying. Excellent book.
  • (3/5)
    Not a bad read by any means, but I have a hard time with a lot of zombie/vampire horror (gets a bit too predictable frequently), and I ended up being pretty disappointed in the roles he placed Kelley and Nora in. I don't have any real urge to continue reading the series, but I think it will make a decent TV show (and thus far it has indeed been decidedly decent, I'll wait a few more episodes for something more definitive than that).
  • (5/5)
    I'm not generally a fan of the horror genre anymore, haven't been for years. I used to collect Stephen King books in my early 20's but that ship sailed quite some time ago. There must be something to the idea that the older you get the more you realize that the truly frightening stuff is on the 6 O'Clock news everyday and there is really no need to scare yourself further with walls that bleed or extra special serial killers. BUT, I loved Pan's Labrynth so I thought "what the hell...". Turns out I couldn't put it down once I started. If I had to describe this book in one sentence... think "[I Am Legend] meets Gil Grissom". I actually found myself taking the book to work with me and holing myself up in my office with the door locked and reading all afternoon instead of working on my research. I just HAD to find out what happened next. And that's, well let's be honest, a pretty nice thing to find in any book. Is the writing a bit sophomoric? Well, only if you dig reading authors like Austen or Faulkner and can no longer enjoy another book that doesn't fall into that category. In this case I find the easier reading style to be a plus. This isn't writing you want to savor like a fine cheese, this is a story you want to totally lose yourself in so that when someone taps on your shoulder somewhere around page 355 you jump and scream like a little girl. And did I mention the best part of the book? Not one vampire SPARKLES. And even better... there will be no debate as to which one is "OMG... hotter?!?!?!"Lastly, another reviewer commented on the inclusion of the holocaust and how unnecessary and offensive they found that to be, the holocaust being horrific enough with the addition of storybook monsters (or something to that affect). And I have to admit that gave me pause for thought. But I think I ultimately don't agree to the point of taking offense. I won't go so far as to say that the author was using the vampire legend as a tool to expose the true monsters in the story (although I believe he inadvertently did, the vampire in question having nothing on the Nazi's if you ask me) but that doesn't mean you can't still walk away understanding that sometimes monsters do walk the earth and they look exactly like the rest of us.Now, how long until the second book comes out?
  • (4/5)
    Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan originally conceived "The Strain" as a serialized television series for the Fox network. After Fox execs balked at the original vision, insisting the writers inject more humor into the storyline of a modern-day vampire apocolypse, del Toro and Hogan decided to take their toys and go home. Rather than create a movie version of this modern day retelling of "Dracula," the two decided to go literary.The result is a new trilogy of books, the first of which debuts this summer and is called "The Strain."And it's one hell of a scary, thrillride.The story's television roots show throughout the novel with a huge cast introduced early in the story, many of whom are vampire-fodder by the mid-point of the story. Del Toro and Hogan's characters aren't exactly deep, but we do get to know them enough to care for them, even as many of them succumb to the mysterious new virus that is infecting New Yorkers."The Strain" is a scary book that comes along at the right time. Del Toro and Hogan's decision to have vampirism spread not through one vampire creating another via bites but as an airborn pathogen is particularily chilling in the time of the H1N1 scare. The story more than chillingly describes how the virus takes over its human hosts, rapidly transforming them into undead vampires. And because this is a book with only the special effects limits of your own imagination, be prepared for to be grossed out at times.You should also be prepared for some unrelentingly creepy moments. The novel's opening scenes with a jet plane sitting on the tarmac at New York airport, silent and completely dark are among some of the more unnerving moments in the book.And while "The Strain" clearly owes an enormous debt to both "Dracula" and "The Stand," it's not quite in the same league as either one. While the novel is populated by a sprawling, diverse cast of characters, many of them are two-dimensional, at best. "The Stand" spent time developing its characters in its virus-induced apocolypse, making many of them cannon-fodder over the course of the story but still getting us to care about them. "The Strain" has an equally high body count, but you won't find yourself as invested in many of the characters here.However, the pace and horror of what's unfolding will keep you reading this one. If your only love of vampires is those created by Stephenie Meyer, then you'll want to skip this one. "The Strain" returns vampires to the dark, scary recesses of the imagination, where they belong.
  • (4/5)
    Much better than you average mindless vampire book. I need to read part II.
  • (5/5)
    Definitely a thrilling ride. It doesn't take long at all to gear up and once it does it never slows down. Twists and turns I didn't expect. Great story-telling, a real page-turner. I was had a hard time putting it down for any length of time. I loved the characters, the complicated relationships between them. I liked that each character had their own personality and voice, even if they weren't around for long. The way that the authors wrote about the differences in social and class structures was also really nice to see. I can hardly wait to get my hands on the next book to continue and find out what happens next. I would definitely recommend it. So worth it! It's not for the faint of heart, but definitely a vampire story that's much different than anything I've read before. And who knew vampire science could be so interesting?! Get this book!!!
  • (4/5)
    A plane lands in New York, but stops dead on the runway, Something is not quite right -- all of the shades are done, and every system on the plane is stone cold dead. Attempts to communicate are unanswered. Even attempts to get in through an emergency exit are unsuccessful. When crews finally break into the plane, they find everyone dead. Well, almost everyone...it seems some were not quite dead yet when a CDC investigator arrives on the scene.It seems there are 4 survivors, but none really know what happened. The investigator finds an ornate wooden box containing soil in the plane's cargo hold. A crazy old guy appears at the hospital, warning him to burn the bodies. He does not, and by morning they are gone. Gone from all of the morgues who received bodies from the flight. Maybe the old man isn't so crazy after all. The CDC investigator is suddenly beat down by his superiors, however. The old man considers it fortunate more drastic measures weren't taken.The old man is a sort of modern-day Van Helsing.(or Lincoln...his first name is even Abraham, which applies to either!) A survivor of a Nazi death camp, he knows of the root evil responsible for the atrocities there. After becoming a professor in Europe, he flees to the US and sets up an innocuous pawn shop as cover as he amasses weapons of vampiric destruction. The CDC investigator, Ephtaim, and his assistant Nora, are blamed for the disappearance of the corpses, and their warnings go unheeded. The old professor helps them escape, and a crusade to slay vampires (especially The Master) ensues. The process of becoming a vampire involves invasion by "capillary worms" which begin a metamorphosis that modifies the body, creating a stinger-like appendage that can strike about 6 feet. Entry typically is with a micro-thin slit in the throat, and it can take several weeks for the creature to change into the final state. The book doesn't yet encounter fully-turned vampires, it is but the first of a trilogy.The book is well written, although the story has a low-budget Hollywood vibe to it. It's not too deep, and aside from initial attempts by law enforcement to take Ephraim and Nora, we don't get a sense of any panic by authorities or the public as this thing spreads throughout New York City (a small town would make more sense in this respect). Ron Perlman's reading (I did the audiobook) ranges from brilliant to boring -- in many passages, his voice settles into a monotone that is difficult to focus on, but when the action happens, he is much more dynamic. He does a great job with foreign accents too, such as the professor.All in all, I felt the same about this book as I did Justin Cronin's The Passage. Interested enough in the next book, but not anxious to get to it. Hopefully in both cases, the story improves in the next book. I usually feel multibook story arcs are not their best in the first book as the characters are first being developed and there is no resolution to the main plot.
  • (3/5)
    This was a very cool concept. Vampire as virus. I loved too how sweetly the authors married the elements of a zombie apocalypse with the story of a city being overrun by vampires. Zombies are undead beings. Vampires are undead beings too. Why not then treat them as such? This book does just that. There are no sparkling or sexy vamps to be found here. Only shambling, dirty, vacant things driven by an unceasing hunger. This is the kind of book I can enjoy despite its flaws.

    ...and flaws there were...

    Some of the characters were unbelievably, unforgivably stupid. I'm talking Darwin Award dense. I could see the deaths coming and plans crumbling from a mile away. Predictable. Annoying. Though not enough of a turn-off to keep me from reading. This was quite the page turner.
  • (3/5)
    Nice update of the Vampire story. Incorporates some of the traditional folklore, but gone is all of the romance, replaced now with science, and not overloaded with graphic violence. Classic good vs. evil. Will continue to the next book. I enjoy listening to the voice of Ron Perlman, though it is not performed in the same way as many other audio books, he does not alter his voice to reflect the voices of different characters, but his reading is very nice. I will continue on to Book 2.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic writing with incredibly creepy images that are hard to forget. Del Toro brings his extensive expertise on anything vampiric and the results are amazing. Was hard to put down and had me waiting for the next installment of the trilogy.
  • (2/5)
    I didn't like this version of "vampires". This book was more like a creature book then a vampire story. In my opinion WAY too much time was spent on the plane, boring..... The ending was not good. I won't rush out to read the second book! The Passage was a much better Vampire book and more worth my reading time.