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Azincourt

Azincourt

Написано Bernard Cornwell

Озвучено Torsten Wahlund


Azincourt

Написано Bernard Cornwell

Озвучено Torsten Wahlund

оценки:
4.5/5 (3 оценки)
Длина:
13 hours
Издано:
Feb 8, 2012
ISBN:
9789186615505
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Описание

Slaget vid Azincourt är ett av världens mest berömda slag. En liten sjuk och hungrig armés seger över en fem gånger större ­ fiende. Kung Henrik V beslutar att anfalla Frankrike för att hävda sin rätt som kung, men lider ett massivt nederlag i Harfleur. Trots detta tar han sin svårt sargade här vidare mot ett till synes oundvikligt nederlag. Den 25 oktober 1415 står hans 6 000 män öga mot öga med 30 000 franska soldater i Azincourt.

Vi får följa den råa sanningen om medeltida krigsföring i all dess chockerande brutalitet, smuts och äckel genom ögonen på bågskytten Nicholas Hook. Han har tidigare varit legosoldat i franska armén, men vid hemkomsten till England blir han, istället för dödad pga sitt svek mot hemlandet, upptäckt och värvad av kung Henrik V. Hooks enorma skicklighet med bågen kommer snart till användning igen. Bågskyttarna kom att spela en avgörande roll för utgången av detta fasansfulla blodbad.

Bernard Cornwell är en av världens största författare i disciplinen historiska spänningsromaner. Hans böcker har översatts till 20 språk och sålt i över 20 miljoner exemplar. Slaget är även förevigat av William Shakespeare i pjäsen Henrik V.

The greatest writer of historical adventures today Washington Post
Издано:
Feb 8, 2012
ISBN:
9789186615505
Формат:
Аудиокнига

Об авторе

BERNARD CORNWELL is the author of the acclaimed New York Times bestselling Saxon Tales series, which includes The Last Kingdom, The Pale Horseman, Lords of the North, Sword Song, The Burning Land, Death of Kings, The Pagan Lord, and, most recently, The Empty Throne and Warriors of the Storm, and which serves as the basis for the hit television series The Last Kingdom. He lives with his wife on Cape Cod and in Charleston, South Carolina.



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4.3
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Отзывы читателей

  • (5/5)
    Excellent historical novel but could have been written with a less graphical description of the horrors of war.
  • (4/5)
    This its a fabulous audio book, and an instance where the narrator made all the difference. Not being a great lover of military history I suspect I would not have made it through a print version, but the audio version was full of excitement and the different characters were vivid and well defined.
  • (5/5)
    What an excellent read. A famous battle between the French and the English that should have been a decisive victory for the French. For historic detail you couldn't ask for better and the story races along at a cracking pace, building with tension to the vividly told battle sequence. From the arrival of the English army in France, we hear of their the long march to Calais, the highs and the lows involved with army life, the horrors of siege warfare, their problems with hunger and the wretchedness of a foot soldiers battle with illness. It's all there in well written, gruesome detail. Some of that detail was hard for me to read, being so violent, yet in spite of it all I can believe it to be an honest account of how things were for these two armies and the Kings who led them. It was the archers with their long bows who made victory for the English possible and it was the mud of the battlefield that helped bring down the heavily armoured French. Gutsy action and language, well researched facts have gone to make this Bernard Cornwell novel a must read for Historical Fiction fans.
  • (4/5)
    True to history as fiction can be.
  • (4/5)
    Cornwell delivers another of his remarkably immediate accounts of battle and warfare from below. This story is as powerful as any of his others but I did not feel my usual level of engagement with his characters. In part, this is because the formula that he applies is too apparent when used on a new series. I did not lose sight of the fictional nature of this tale even though I was deeply engaged by the history.
  • (5/5)
    Once again Bernard Cornwell excells in this fascinating novel.Only one thing bothered me and that was that I had read a similar book before maybe from the same author.But my memory deserts me.
  • (5/5)
    Exceptional historical fiction set in the reign of Henry V, this book gives an account of some of the key battles between England and France, culminating at Agincourt. Mr. Cornwell's excellence lies in his thorough and detailed research and in a style of writing that allows the reader to immerse themselves in the historical period. His descriptions of battles are relentless and, at times, perhaps a bit too graphic for some readers. His characters are utterly believable, his settings flawless, his story compelling. Highly recommended for those who enjoy solid historical fiction.
  • (4/5)
     Excellent page turner of a book.

    Follows one Nicholas Hook, Archer, from trouble on the Lord's estate to trouble in London to joining the king's army in France. He survives these adventures, and the road leads to Agincourt (the title uses the spelling of the French village, rather than the usual English version).

    Sometimes a little contrived - how two particular people happen to meet on a battlefield filled with 25,000 people is perhaps a little far-fetched, but you can forgive him that when it is such a rip-roaring read. Full of great historical detail but it's a good story that rolls along at a good pace too.

    One of his best.
  • (3/5)
    This is my first Cornwell book and I read it at the suggestion of my husband who is a big fan. I am a fan of GRRM and the Game of Thrones series. He figured I would like this book too. Which I did but...Cornwell and Martin are similar in terms of their gritty approach to describing events on the battlefield. And I'm fine with that. I want to read about bloody battles. It is part of the adventure. But Cornwell does not create a story line that appeals to me like Martin does. The novel is really for those readers who want to learn how a battle is fought during medieval times. There were long stretches of the book that went into lengthy details that bored me. I did however learn a great deal about archery. I do enjoy learning my history through novels. I would recommend this book to anyone who is a fan of medieval times but maybe not so much anyone without much of a stomach for warfare.
  • (3/5)
    I ordered this book thinking it was a detailed look at the Battle of Agincourt, certainly one of the most celebrated battles in all of world history. It was soon clear, however, that this work of historical fiction actually touches only briefly on the battle itself. There are currently two other books named Agincourt which provide a more in depth, scholarly analysis.The book focuses on an English archer named Nicholas Hook, who through a confrontation with a crooked priest becomes an outlaw and is forced to leave his home in England. He becomes a mercenary, spends some time fighting in a French civil war before returning to England and ultimately becoming part of the army of Henry V which invades France in 1415, leading to the climactic Battle of Agincourt. Historical events are all seen through the eyes of young Hook.While I was already somewhat familiar with the history of the era, the book does contain some very interesting and enlightening information on the composition and fighting techniques of the armies of the period, especially as related to the siege of Harfleur which takes up a large part of the book.All in all, however, while the Battle of Agincourt does take place near the end of the book, it plays only a minor role in the story. This is a very mediocre piece of historical fiction, written quite simply and could easily be enjoyed by a junior high student who might benefit from an introduction to this historical period.
  • (3/5)
    I don't think it's Cornwall's best but it's still decent, worth a read if you're interested in the era.
  • (4/5)
    I listened to this book during my commutes this Feb/March. Like all Bernard Cornwell novels, this story was gritty and full of violence. The everyday tasks and annoyances of life in a darker time were in full view. Agincourt gives us an archer's view of this famous battle. Cornwell, as usual, gives us a very detailed look at what a battle must have been like when experienced in the front lines. Great care is given to the details of period armor and weapons, what they were specifically used for and how things like soil condition could turn a battle. The historical elements are also profound. Priests are just men, some are good and some are evil. Yeah, that sounds about right. As far as the archery goes, he hit all the right chords. When you know the things a middle ages archer would worry about on a daily basis, it makes that person slightly more relatable. As always, I look forward to more novels from this fun author.
  • (5/5)
    A very enjoyable read. Great story. While this is fiction it does fill in some historical gaps of my own. Now I want to watch again the film Kenneth Branagh directed and acted in, Henry V by Shakespeare.
  • (5/5)
    Famtastic Bernard outdid himself!
  • (4/5)
    The first of Bernard Cornwell's books I have read. I enjoyed it quite a lot. Haven't really read much historical fiction but this is certianly my cup of tea and I'll be looking into more of these books. The build up to the final battle was good and I felt that the author conveyed the sense of being an archer in a medieval army very well.Sometimes the story felt a little clumsy and predictable, the inevitable attempt of the dodgy priest on Hook's wife and the battle between John Cornwailles and Lanferrelle, but these didn't cause me too much grief.
  • (4/5)
    My first time reading something by Bernhard Cornwell. For anyone who enjoys a good middle-ages style of historical fiction this book would be perfect. It had lots of action and decent character development. It turned out to be a real quick and fun read. I will definitely read another Cornwell novel in the future.
  • (5/5)
    Cornwell has done it again. Well researched, captivatingly told, and beautifully spun into a tale of one yeoman archer in king Henry's army.
  • (5/5)
    I have always loved anything on Medieval history, even historical fiction. However, with this book, it is about as close to historical fact that a fiction book can be. It is meticulously researched and most of the characters in the story were actual soldiers in the battle on public record in France. I loved this book and the story it shows. If there is one book you are going to read on Medieval warfare, fact or fiction, this HAS to be it. Warning: it is very vulgar and gruesome, but that is how combat was back then.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting historical novel, well written, and he gives you
    the real history after the end of the novel.
  • (5/5)
    I'm halfway through this book and find it hard to put down, very interesting story and will keep your interest. I read Cornwell's book on Stonehenge as well, another great historical fiction book. Agincourt took my interest from seeing the Henry VIII film based on Shakespear's work, the movie was fantastic and this book so far is as well. For those into historical fiction, I think you would enjoy this book, it has some interesting information on how the archers lived and applied their craft.
  • (3/5)
    Cornwell turns to the now legendary Battle of Agincourt as inspiration and foundation for his novel Azincourt, using the archer, Nick Hook (an actual historical archer who was at Agincourt) as the vehicle for this story. The story itself attempts to illuminate the actual events that led to King Henry V's resounding victory over the French, using a fictional backdrop of Hook's family feud, a damsel in distress, and the guidance of Saints Crispin and Cripinian (who speak to Hook) as the plot arc. On a personal level, I wanted very much to enjoy this story. The subject matter is one I've researched extensively and have found of fascination for decades. I'm afraid, however, my enjoyment was overshadowed by Cornwell's heavy hand illustrating gore, and several technical inaccuracies which, for the average reader, wouldn't be an issue, but for me twanged in the way of a badly-tuned instrument. An entertaining read, but not a memorable one.
  • (4/5)
    Having read the other reviews, I have very little to add. I enjoyed the book except for two aspects: the extreme violence and church bashing. Yes, both were true. War is hell, but I don't find hell entertaining. It is a personal failure on my part, I suppose. As for the church bashing, one does not need to look far to see failure within the church -- failure at the criminal level -- but one does need to look between the trees to see it. In this analogy, the trees are the good things that the church as done.

    Had those two aspects been in balance, then I would have rated this book a five. Bernard Cornwell did his homework (as far as I can tell) and crafted a great story that put flesh on an historic event that would otherwise have been left to dry military history. I appreciated his historical notes at the end, in that they showed what in the story was according to record and what wasn't. I especially liked that even the protagonist's name was drawn from historical documents. Well done, Mr. Cornwell.
  • (4/5)
    I have enjoyed this novel. I like the way it is written, enjoy the characters, and feel that it is written for either men or women.
  • (5/5)
    Cornwell's writing is simply amazing. He expertly weaves the lives of his characters around huge events that allows the reader to experience both parts of history without feeling manipulated. It goes without saying that Cornwell's descriptions of battle and strategy are excellent, but his writing is equally stunning in how he brings individuals from such a foreign time and place to life.
  • (4/5)
    As with all of Bernard Cornwell's books, Agincourt is an exciting adventure. My only complaint with his books is that they are fairly formulaic; same story, different battle. Fortunately for him and us, it is a good story.
  • (3/5)
    Bernard Cornwell delivers an excellent retelling of Henry V 's fight with the French in the 15th century.
  • (5/5)
    "We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother" Henry VWhat would you do if you heard voices in your head telling you what to do, would you follow them?Nick Hook does and they lead him on a journey across England and France. He tries to make up for past mistakes, to make ammends and earn redemption in order to deserve a chance at life and at love. His bravery and strength make him the perfect archer in King Henry V's army and lands him at one of the most famous battles of all time- Agincourt!Great read for guys or girls, especially for history buffs and fans of Shakespeare's Henry V like myself. A thrilling read that kept me turning the pages. My only compaint is that I wanted it to go on...
  • (4/5)
    Cornwell's Agincourt is a one-off novel (not part of series) taking place during Henry V's chevauchee through France in 1415. It follows the fortunes of an archer named Nick Hook, who is plagued by enemies of his family and narrowly escaped a French atrocity at Soissons. Returning to England, he is enlisted in Henry's campaign, which began with the long siege and capture of Harfleur, and then a long trek through northern France as the army made its way toward Calais to evacuate back to England. Henry believed he was on a mission from god, however, and was making a statement claiming he was the rightful heir to the French crown.The French and Burgundians, meanwhile, put together a massive army, intent on crushing the upstart English king once and for all. By most accounts, the army opposing Henry was three to four times the size of sick, depleted English force. The armies met near the town of Agincourt, on a muddy field saturated by rain the night before. The mud bogged down French men-at-arms and cavalry in heavy armor, while the English longbowmen wreaked havoc upon the initial waves. As the body count mounted, the French struggled to get past the wall of corpses, and were defeated in detail. The result was one of those most one-sided and unlikely victories in the history of warfare.The battle took place on the feast day for the saints Crispian and Crispianan, coincidentally the patron saints of Soissons whose aforementioned destruction at the hands of French and English turncoats instigated the campaign. This leads to the only thing I really didn't like about the book -- those two saints would actually "speak" to Hook, saving his life on multiple occasions. I'm not really a fan of incorporating supernatural nonsense into historical novels, so this is a pet peeve more than anything else. Cornwell used a variety of resources for his historical background material, the most important was the book Agincourt by Juliet Barker, a book I read a few years ago and highly recommend.
  • (3/5)
    Bernard Cornwell is a master of action-adventure historical fiction. His Sharpe series, tracing the exploits of an infantryman through the Napoleonic Wars, is his most well-known work, but represents only about half of his output. Agincourt is one of the most famous battles, and victories, in British history. This event and this author were made for each other and it seems strange that it took so long to bring them together.The wait was worth it. Cornwell manages his narrative in a believable way to take us through the build-up and actual battle. The way men fought is well described and he does not shy away from the brutality of the age while convincingly portraying this as a time, like any other, when people got on with their lives as best they could.Cornwell clearly understands his history and cleverly weaves it into the narrative and action so we never feel we are being lectured.If there is a weakness, Cornwell, like many action writers, draws women sketchily and never quite knows how to bring them into the centre of the action. They end up as little more than plot devices. Having said that, you don’t read a Cornwell novel to get insights into man-woman relationships.
  • (4/5)
    Obviously extremely well researched, this book leaves you not doubting for a moment that Cornwell knows his stuff. It is also written in a very captivating way, albeit revelling a little too much in the blood and guts I thought, with graphic descriptions of torture and killing. But I suppose it was a vicious time, too. As a linguist I naturally wonder whether the anachronism of the modern language takes away from the credibility of the story, but then again if it was written in the language of the time it would be fairly unreadable...