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Sabriel

Sabriel

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Sabriel

оценки:
4/5 (987 оценки)
Длина:
427 страниц
6 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
Oct 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780061975134
Формат:
Книга

Описание

Game of Thrones fans will love the New York Times bestselling Abhorsen series. Sabriel, the first installment in the trilogy, launched critically acclaimed author Garth Nix onto the fantasy scene as a rising star.

Since childhood, Sabriel has lived outside the walls of the Old Kingdom, away from the power of Free Magic, and away from the Dead who refuse to stay dead. But now her father, the Abhorson, is missing, and Sabriel must cross into that world to find him. With Mogget, whose feline form hides a powerful, perhaps malevolent spirit, and Touchstone, a young Charter Mage, Sabriel travels deep into the Old Kingdom. There she confronts an evil that threatens much more than her life and comes face-to-face with her own hidden destiny. …

Издатель:
Издано:
Oct 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780061975134
Формат:
Книга

Об авторе

Garth Nix was born in 1963 in Melbourne, Australia, to the sound of the Salvation Army band outside playing’Hail the Conquering Hero Comes’ or possibly’Roll Out the Barrel’. Garth left Melbourne at an early age for Canberra (the federal capital) and stayed there till he was nineteen, when he left to drive around the UK in a beat-up Austin with a boot full of books and a Silver-Reed typewriter. He is now an award-winning author and one of the most influential names in contemporary fantasy.


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4.2
987 оценки / 172 Обзоры
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Отзывы критиков

  • Witches are cool and all, but it's way cooler to be the Abhorsen, the legendary necromancer in Garth Nix's "Old Kingdom" series. Sabriel and her daughter, Lirael, are trained to be the greatest, most noble necromancers, and just, who doesn't want to read about that?

    Scribd Editors

Отзывы читателей

  • (4/5)
    As heard in the insanely catchy theme song of Netflix’s The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, “females are strong as hell.” Garth Nix’s Old Kingdom series can attest to that, as all five novels focus on the lives of a variety of tenacious young women living in a fantastical realm plagued by necromancers and undead creatures. While every book in the series shares commonalities, particularly the highly imaginative system of magic, each main character possesses different strengths and weaknesses, and must overcome many dangerous obstacles.

    As an introduction to the series, Sabriel stands out as the most description heavy. Nix takes his time unfolding the kingdom’s peculiarities, including its separation into two distinct lands: the “modern” Ancelstierre, and the Old Kingdom, where Charter magic runs rampant and dark creatures reside. The magic system is the most fascinating element, as Sabriel and her father are both powerful Charter mages who can enter Death and cast out dead creatures through the wielding of bells.

    Sabriel is the most confident of the women in the series, as she has a strong sense of self and a firm grasp on her magical abilities. When her father sends her on a mission to defeat a necromancer manipulating the kingdom, Sabriel’s power is tested as she faces a plethora of creatures with varying levels of power. Her traveling companion, Mogget, provides some much-needed humor, although his nature is somewhat unpredictable.

    The weakest part of the novel comes near the end when Nix introduces a new character, Touchstone. His sudden appearance feels slightly hasty, and his connection to Sabriel a bit forced, but this is remedied in future novels.
  • (5/5)
    I first read this book in middle school (maybe high school?). I remembered that I'd read it, but I'd completely forgotten the plot. This was so good! Plus, now I know where George RR Martin got most of his ideas.
  • (3/5)
    Idk how to rate this. I had totally forgotten about the annoying love story between Sabriel and Touchstone. I had also forgotten about Kerrigor being turned into a cat which is wonderful, how could I forget that.

    Mhm it's not as great as I had remembered it but also not as terrible as I feared it might be? Solid necromantic entertainment tbh. Also not too bad from a whump perspective.
  • (5/5)
    A young woman finds herself thrust into a task that she feels unprepared for, and of course you have to hope that, despite the odds, she succeeds. This being fantasy, first cousin to fairytales and heir to human dreams, you can be almost certain that she will. But, to quote the song, it's not what you do but the way that you do it: that's what gets results... And because Garth Nix is a talented writer, with a long track record in publishing and editing, the end result is a very distinguished and impressive first volume in The Old Kingdom series. (In some countries the trilogy is named the Abhorsen series, from the title of the gatekeeper between the realms of the living and the dead.) Nix, an Australian author, seems to have used Scotland and the North of England as his inspiration for the trilogy, though it's a Britain very different from anything we're now familiar with, not least because technology and attitudes correspond more closely to the early decades of the twentieth century. The Old Kingdom, at present without a king, is a realm where magic is so prevalent that the boundaries between Death and Life are easily crossed by adepts. It most resembles Scotland in being a land where kilts are not unknown, lying to the north of an edifice corresponding to Hadrian's Wall which divides it off from a rather unmagical Ancelstierre. But you will look in vain to identify equivalents in Scotland for features in the Old Kingdom, though the royal city shares some similarities with Edinburgh (as well as medieval Byzantium). There are even two types of magic: Charter Magic, the purer form, and Free Magic, much harder to govern. I very much liked Nix's treatment of things magical, and while the rationale behind it (Where does it come from? Why is it strong in the Old Kingdom?) is rather vague in this story, its manifestation and all its detailing (Charter Marks, the taste of Free Magic) is well imagined and described. As a musician I was entranced by his wonderful concept of the sounds of bells precipitating magical effects, and I felt that each of Sabriel's seven bells was imbued with its own character to match its effects. In vain did I try to link them to systems in other cultures, though the ancient idea of the Music of the Spheres came close.Some readers have complained about the rather perfunctory love story in this young adult novel, but I thought that the balance between this and the fantasy elements was about right. In any case, as the plot driver is mostly about the relationship between Sabriel and her endangered father, any overloading of romantic elements would have distracted from the parent-child bond that Sabriel concentrates on.The sheer inventiveness that Nix displays is very impressive: I particularly liked the paperwings, gliders that respond to Charter Magic; gliders were of course still a relative novelty in our equivalent early 20th century culture. Other commonplace elements, such as the dead being reanimated, are treated in a way that feel fresh, for all our modern familiarity with zombies and their ilk. One of his wonderful conceptions is Mogget, a snow-white cat who is not what he seems, and who functions rather like a Cheshire Cat to Sabriel's Alice role. The touches of sly humour that Mogget provides helps to leaven the sheer and sustained dread that confronts Sabriel throughout the novel and which continues virtually to the very end of the tale. There are also the wordplays that wordsmiths like Nix like to employ, wordplays such as Kerrigor, the name of the character who has precipitated the crisis and who perhaps derives his name from a medieval Arthurian poem. In this Welsh poem reference is made to an Otherworld castle called Caer Rigor, the Royal Fort, and which itself perhaps contains a pun on Latin rigor, 'harshness' or 'severity'. Another series of allusions concerns the holders of the post of Abhorsen, whose names end in -el, such as Sabriel, Terciel, Lirael and Clariel. This is surely a nod towards the names of the Biblical archangels, such as Michael and Raphael, the suffix of which means 'power' or 'divinity' and which is cognate with elohim, one of the Hebrew names for gods or God. Sabriel and her fellow Abhorsens are like those mighty powers who guard the boundary between this world and the next, comparable to the unnamed angel who stops Adam and Eve returning to Eden or to Michael who defeats the armies of Satan. Sabriel is perhaps the Hebrew sabra or prickly pear, tough on the outside but soft inside, both a young girl on the cusp of womanhood and a guardian angel.Like many a good tale Sabriel works on different levels: a solid narrative to appeal to a first reading, and layers of allusion and echoes of other narratives, especially apt in a plot involving bells, to add to the joy of subsequent re-readings.
  • (3/5)
    Despite flaws -- perhaps some more egregious than others -- I liked this book. It starts badly, laying out a set of "situations" without clarity and not at all intuitive to figure out. It's got a bit of Indiana Jones and Camelot Excalibur supernatural to it. Also, some Dracula. Some zombie apocalypse. More than a little Lord of the Rings. But it's really none of those things. Very slowly the reader just starts to accept certain "realities" without adequate explanation. And the pace, the tension just keeps building, and building, and building. As you get closer and closer to the last pages of the book, you have to start wondering if someone tore out some of the back pages, because everything just can't get resolved in time. Can it? It's also at this point that "real time" gets stretched out more and more. Five minutes of story line goes from a sentence or two to a few pages. Details of actions, emotions, consequences start to overflow the banks of the narrative river. Enough all ready. Just tell me what's happening. No lengthy commission report needed. Nevertheless, it never quite lost my interest. I wanted to find out what was going to happen next and that's something.
  • (2/5)
    Intriguing concept, fantastic world building, amazing writing, great characters, I could go on and list more good things about this book, but I guess I should get to explaining why the low rating. Well, it's as simple as, I wasn't drawn in or very excited reading this book. Loved some of the aspects of this story so much, but it just laid flat on the pages for me. The more I learned about the world the more anxious I became for what's to come, it fell flat for me again. Sabriel seems okay, but that's just it, okay. Don't know why, but I just didn't connect with the story, it didn't excite me or kept me interested. I just couldn't wait to finish it already, which I did, which is plus for the book, I wasn't so bored that I DNF'ed it.

    I know that this is one of those books loved by many, which was why I expected to love it. I kept hearing how great it was so I eventually grabbed up the Kindle book when it was on sale. So disappointed I didn't like it, no fault of anybody's, it was obviously well written, it's Garth Nix, so. It just shows how it goes sometimes I guess. Not every book always translate the same to everyone.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. It had everything you would expect in a classic fiction tale, and was reminiscent of the Narnia series. Yes, there wasn't detailed character development, but that is to be expected in this kind of a story, and it worked well within this frame. The plot moved along pretty well and the different characters that were introduced were intriguing to read about. I liked the whole story line of necromancy and the dead and the power to control them. The magic system that the author has created is unique and I'm eager to learn more about it (as I'm sure I will in the next book in the series)! Overall, it is a well-written and imaginative fantasy novel geared towards pre-teens/teenagers. So if you are looking for a present for someone within that age group, this would be the one to get!
  • (5/5)
    Sabriel Sabriel by Garth Nix. Sabriel Is a good fantasy book that explores a world of magic and necromancy, Sabriel is a girl who is pushed into a place that she is not ready yet, she accepts the role so she can find her father and save the Old Kingdom, Sabriel is my first Garth Nix book
  • (5/5)
    Sabriel is the first book in the Aborsen trilogy, which is easily my favorite YA high fantasy series. It's set in a country very much like 1920's Britain, except instead of Hadrian's Wall, the Wall in the this Britain prevents magic (and the dead) from seeping across. I would recommend this series to high school students, and to middle school students who are advanced readers.
  • (5/5)
    Sabriel was the first fantasy novel I ever read, and even now, over a decade later, it is still my favorite. In this book and its trilogy Garth Nix has written some of my favorite characters (Mogget!) and created a wonderful and rich world. His awe-inspring descriptions of some of the places in the Old Kingdom (and beyond?) stay with me to this day.I strongly recommend this book to fantasy-lovers, young-adult readers, and (especially!) to young women for the fantastic portrayal of a young woman who puts evil back in its place (not because she is a woman, or in spite of it, but just because she's a strong and amazing person). This was also the first novel I ever read with a strong female protagonist, and I remember being so excited and happy about *finally* reading a book about a girl! Who's tough! Like me! That was a wonderful feeling.
  • (4/5)
    Couldn't put it down! Love it
  • (5/5)
    I randomly picked up this book from the library shelf when I was in 7th grade. With the exception of Lord of the Rings it is probably the best Fantasy world that I have found, because it is systematic, fun, but realistic within the rules Garth Nix created for this world. Plus I thought the main character was SO cool when i first read it and I still haven't gotten bored with her.
  • (5/5)
    I really liked this book, especially how the world of Sabriel works. The magic, the relation between life and death and the mystery surrounding the 'old kingdom' made me want to read more. Sabriel is a believable character with both strengths and flaws. The only downside for me was that a large part of the journey was over sea. I wanted to see more of the adventures in the Old Kingdom. Despite that flaw, I enjoyed every page of this book and I'm interested in the rest of the series.
  • (5/5)
    Terrific fantasy novel with an interesting and strong heroine.
  • (5/5)
    I keep falling in love with this book. No matter how many times I read Sabriel.
  • (5/5)
    Fabulous fantasy novel about necromancy.
  • (4/5)
    Sabriel by Garth Nix is set in a world where Necromancy holds sway. Things and people die but death is not always so permanent. Traditionally necromancy is a really weird and creepy practice but in this book the main character is a necromancer whose job is to help those who have died complete their journey to death so that they are not reawakened by someone with sinister purposes. The main character is also sometimes able to return to life those who only just recently died but it comes at a cost and can be very dangerous.I'm not typically into stories that revolve around death but Nix was able to craft a story that focused on death but did not become super heavy and overwhelming. I very much recommend this book to anybody interested in a fantasy type story.(****)
  • (4/5)
    This was an Audio book from the Library that I listened to on my way to work. There were times when I didn't want to get out of my car because I had come to an exciting point in the tape. This Audio book was narrated by Tim Curry and starts with a flashback in which a current Abhorsen, a special necromancer, loses his wife but saves his baby daughter Sabriel from a creature called Kerrigor, in the spiritual river of death. Many years later, at Sabriels English like boarding school, she must take up her father's magical sword and the bells of a Necromancer and try to find out what has happened to him. To do so, she must leave her new Kingdom school and go where magic rules and evil things like Kerrigor are stalking her.Along the way, she is accompanied by the guard Touchstone, a Royal and the King of the Old Kingdom and the charter magic contained cat-spirit Mogget. They must try to defeat the evil Kerrigor, who wants to blast the Charter which keeps all things from descending into evil.Sabriel was a delightful fantasy that I am sorry came to and end. Sabriel comes to accept that her father, the former Abhorsen, is now on her own and is the new and last Abhorsen. She really just wants to be Sabriel and not the Abhorsen and she acts and thinks precisely like any young woman in this position. She's strong, intriguing, and no slack with a sword in a bad situation. I really enjoyed Garth Nix's charcters.Sabriel was a wonderful role model who also is developing feelings for Touchstone. Touchstone feels guilt for what he has allowed to happen but won't let Sabriel down as he feels he has done others. and Mogget was certainly unique. He's a peculiar mix of good and evel. This ancient spirit forced to live as a cat is enslaved to the Abhorsen family for the good of everyone (we get a glimpse of how dangerous he can be). The world that Garth Nix dreamed up, a mixture of Tolkien and WW2 England, is unparalleled in the fantasy genre. It's populated by animated ghouls, ghastly Mordicants, the almost-human sending's, Charter ghosts, the inhabitants of the river of Death, where only Abhorsens go, and so on...I certainly enjoyed his writing style which the narrator helped to bring across. I would certainly recommend this book, especially the Audio book, to anyone. Jack Murphy
  • (4/5)
    Sabriel is the daughter of Abhorsen, a powerful mage tasked with protecting the world from evil forces of death originating from the Old Kingdom, to the north beyond the wall. She is pulled out of a mundane life at boarding school when Abhorsen goes missing, and she has to travel into the Old Kingdom (and into death itself) to find him and save everyone from a terrible evil.I probably should have read this book earlier in my life, because I was not very impressed. The plot is a good fantasy adventure story, but my standards have changed in the past few decades! It's a very pre-Harry Potter type of fantasy, with lots of mood-setting but not much world-building. Post-Harry Potter fantasy definitely has its own problems with too much world-building, but had so many questions about the world of Sabriel that I had trouble getting a grip and I was distracted from the plot. Is Ancelstierre a country? A continent? How big is it? (The map in my edition only showed a sliver of Ancelstierre south of the wall.) What is life like for the people who live far away from the wall? Do they know that magic exists or are they just like us? Does this world have some relation to our world? When does the story take place in relation to our world? (I calculated roughly the 1920s, because there is a mention of tanks just having been invented, which is a very distinct choice to make when writing a book in the 1990s, so why??). Aside from world-building questions, the narration switched focus sometimes in a way that I did not like. The book was decent, but not outstanding. I might continue the series one day.
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful world building and a page-turning plot.
  • (5/5)
    Sabriel is the daughter of the necromancer Abhorsen, grown up cloistered away at boarding school in Ancelstierre, to the south of the Old Kingdom. When her father goes missing and a messenger arrives with his magical implements, she knows something terrible has happened and sets out to find him. But the road north is filled with dangers, one more terrifying than the other, but fortunately Sabriel manages to make some friends along the way. Will she be able to locate her father and defeat the evil that's coming to engulf both the Old Kingdom and Ancelstierre?I'm constantly amazed by the quality of the literature that young adults can draw on these days, and this book, the first in a fantasy series about necromancy, is no exception. Like many other YA heroes and heroines of YA novels, Sabriel is thrown from a sheltered life headlong into her destiny and danger, completely unprepared for the difficult tasks ahead, and she has to learn how to deal with the undead quickly and grow up fast. The action resembles a rollercoaster: relentless pace followed by short periods of breathing space and some light relief provided by Mogget, a Free Magic being bound in the form of a cat, before the action hurtles along once again at break-neck speed. This is dark fantasy at its best, and the undead are suitably creepy and definitely not suitable for younger readers. I loved the imagery of the seven bells the Abhorsen wields to control and banish the Dead, and the river symbolising death rushing through the Nine Gates. And how cool is the role reversal, a young woman for once being the action hero and getting to rescue the prince?The book was originally published in 1995, and I wouldn't be surprised if J.K. Rowling and G.R.R. Martin took inspiration from it (the Battle of Hogwarts and eternal winter north of the Wall, with the dead refusing to stay dead).Even though the ending doesn't exactly constitute a cliff-hanger, it's clear that the story continues, and I'm glad I've already got Lariel, the sequel, lined up.
  • (4/5)
    Sabriel receives a satchel with her father's necromancer tool and the message that he is beyond the Seventh Gate of Death and that she needs to take over his role of Abhorsen and defeat Kerrigor who is attempting to resurrect himself and destroy the Charter of the Old Kingdom. What a great story! The characters are really believable (if not plausible) and the world building is pretty close to flawless. Can't wait to continue the series. The audiobook is read Tim Curry, who is a fantastic narrator.
  • (4/5)
    It seemed long past time that I read Sabriel, one of Karen's favorite books, that she bought me for my birthday. It's not exactly a djinn book, but there are marids and necromancers and magic. It's not exactly polar fiction, but there is a lot of snow. Though early in the book, there were two instances describing snow that shook my faith in the author -- causing me to look up from my book and wonder if the author had ever seen snow before. Luckily, my suspension of belief was limited to only those two moments.

    In general I was immersed in Nix's world, and often appreciated its complexity. There were a few moments that didn't seem fully realized, that the story didn't seem to an exist in a universe with a history stretching back farther than the earliest plot points of this particular story. Mostly it was an intriguing and complicated world, and I suspect it may have only bothered me because I was holding it up in my mind for the scrutiny of my friend eventually asking me, "So, did you love it?"

    I enjoyed it. I would not be averse to reading the rest of the trilogy, but they aren't jumping right to the top of my to-read list, either. I liked the bells, the charmed cat, the flying machine, the concept of the boy turned to wood (though his character seemed a bit YA simplified.) A lot of lovely ideas here!
  • (5/5)
    How did I miss this book for so long? So good! Great characters, exciting plot, interesting twists and turns, overall a fantastic book. Need to get the second one ASAP!
  • (5/5)
    Sabriel Sabriel by Garth Nix Sabriel Is a good fantasy book that explores a world of magic and necromancy, Sabriel is a girl who is pushed into a place that she is not ready yet, she accepts the role so she can find her father and save the Old Kingdom, Sabriel is my first Garth Nix book.
  • (5/5)
    The Old Kingdom series, which began with Sabriel, is one of the most engaging and unique magical worlds I have ever had the pleasure of coming across. The magical systems are well thought out and unlike anything else I've ever encountered; the characters are realistic, normal for their age, and very engaging. This is by far one of my favorite series, and it all begins here.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this story of a young woman who suddenly finds herself inheriting her father's title as Abhorsen (= big wig necromancer) and on a quest that will take her across the wall and into another world. I love the world-building and the idea of the abhorsen and the plot conflict was great, but the characters seemed a little flat and although I did enjoy listening to this one, I didn't get involved enough to want to continue with the series. Tim Curry was excellent, though, as the reader.
  • (5/5)
    This book snagged me in and didn't let me know until the rest of the series was devoured by my brain.

    The worlds (yes, two different lands seperated by an intimidating wall) Nix created are livly and diverse, creating a place for you to enjoyably emerse yourself in. The action and adventure never really cease, as Sabriel explores the Old Kingdom - a place she's heard many stories about from her father but had yet to set foot in herself. Armed with some shaky but useful skills to keep the dead DEAD, she goes off to find her father with the undead trailing her, and the Charter on her side...

    If you like strong female charachers, epic battles, fast-paced storyline, and feel like a new twist on the fantasy and magic genre, this book needs to be read by you!
  • (4/5)
    A weird and creepy katabasis story in a land where the dead walk and shadows threaten the living.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about Sabriel, an adventurous girl who for many years lived outside the walls of the Old Kingdom away from the power of free magic. But now her father, Mage Abhorsen is missing and Sabriel needs to return to the world of free magic to rescue him. She finds companions along the way such as Mogget and Touchstone who are powerful creatures of the magical world. With danger on all sides they only have each other to trust and must travel deep inside the Old Kingdom to a place battle which will put them in situations of life and death. Sabriel will be bought face to face with her own concealed destiny. This is the only way to find her beloved father. The best thing about the book is that there are small events that gradually build up into the complication and also that the book is based purely upon magic and fantasy will take you into a new mysterious world. I didn’t like the way that at some parts the book dragged along which made it boring as there weren’t any sparks and sudden events which would make the reader more enthusiastic. You might like the book if you also enjoyed fantasy books or you have adored the series of Garth Nix as this is the first book of the series. A good place to read this book would be in a quite and peaceful surrounding so you can use your imagination to take yourself into the book. So you can be creative and involve yourself in what you are reading. If this book was a film I think that Angelina Jolie would be Sabriel, Touchstone would be Will Smith, Mogget would be Sarah Kingston and the father would be Ross Ferrell. If it had a soundtrack it would be Everlasting World.