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Wuthering Heights Complete Text with Extras

Wuthering Heights Complete Text with Extras

Автор Emily Brontë

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Wuthering Heights Complete Text with Extras

Автор Emily Brontë

оценки:
4/5 (286 оценки)
Длина:
429 страниц
8 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
Jun 8, 2010
ISBN:
9780062023308
Формат:
Книга

Описание

I cannot live without my life!

I cannot live without my soul!

When Catherine and Heathcliff's childhood friendship grows into something so much more, what ensues is one of the greatest love stories of all time. Even as fate conspires against them and passion consumes them, nothing can keep Catherine and Heathcliff apart. Not even death . . . for their forbidden love is unlike any other.

Emily Brontë's masterpiece remains as compelling and thrilling as ever. Beautifully presented for a modern teen audience, this is the must-have edition of a timeless classic.

Издатель:
Издано:
Jun 8, 2010
ISBN:
9780062023308
Формат:
Книга

Об авторе

Emily Brontë (1818–1848) was the sister of Charlotte and Anne Brontë. Educated by their clergyman father and inspired by the works of Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, and Sir Walter Scott, all three sisters wrote poetry and fiction under pen names. Emily Brontë’s only novel, Wuthering Heights, received mixed reviews when it was first published, but is now considered a masterpiece of English literature.


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3.8
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  • (3/5)
    300-odd pages of unpleasant people being hateful to each other.
  • (1/5)
    I originally reviewed this book on my blog - The Cosy Dragon. For more recent reviews by me, please hop over there.

    This is a classic novel that I have been assigned to study in literature. This is not something I would choose to read by myself by any means. I didn't love the language, I didn't feel for the characters, but I read it anyway! Do I think anything is good about this novel? Well, maybe.

    This novel starts out slowly, and painfully, and I had to entice myself to read onwards with not allowing myself to read anything else (or is that punishment?). The drivel that is written, complete with personal endearing terms that I'm sure the author felt added colour, but just irritated me because I had to look to the back of the book to see what they meant.

    Eventually the storytelling gets going, and it is focused on the past for a time, with Mr Lockwood being told stories by his housekeeper. This part did keep me reading to an extent, mainly because I was ignoring another task I needed to be doing.

    I have to admit I did not finish reading this book. I haven't locked myself in for studying the unit that this book is required for this semester, and so I have abandoned it in favour of other things I need to read first. If I do end up taking the unit, I will finish reading this book, and post another review of my feelings about the whole thing.

    I'm sure there are Bronte fans out there that are going to hate me for saying this - but I really didn't feel for Heathcliff. I felt that he brought so many of his troubles upon himself, he didn't deserve any sympathy, not matter how bad things were for him.

    I find the cover of this book visually appealing at least. It fits in with the storms that seem to plague the countryside now that Lockwood has moved it (or at least it seems that way!).

    I'm not sure why you would want to read this book, except that it is a classic, and therefore is probably worth reading just to say yo have. I know that there is a movie based on it, and on the parts I saw of it, it is relatively violent. I'd recommend this book for adults I guess. But really - there are so many other good things to read out there, you don't need to waste your time on this one!
  • (5/5)
    Very few novels have intrigued me as much as "Wuthering Heights" by Emily Brontë has, and I have read many great books in my life. It captures a significant theme of the Victorian Era, one that so many writers chose to overlook: death, destruction, and the melancholy gardens we sow. Among other authors, Emily Brontë transformed the faux pas of a bad ending into an approachable- nay controversial- subject. Her novel helped revolutionize the overall tone of pre-contemporary literature.“Wuthering Heights” was originally published in 1847, and authentically captures daily life in that time-period. There are scenes that many of us recognize as being entirely victorian: maids and manservants, ruffled dresses, and the diction of their everyday conversation; however, drops of reality sneak into this realistic portrayal of life as it was in the 1800s. Prejudice, abuse; premature death, hysteria; unseen killers hidden in the walls and beauty products. Each flaw has a story that has finally revealed by scientists with knowledge of lead and formaldehyde. In just the same way, every character has a purpose... which is why less than twenty people can be seen from the beginning to the end. Intentionality reeves in between the binding of this enthralling novel. "Wuthering Heights" is steeped in melancholy and draped in veils of woe. Readers follow Heathcliff across the moors of the UK. His story is much different than the romantic tale of “Pride and Prejudice”, where two people fall in love and eventually marry. Instead, the story is founded upon turmoil, which leads to inevitable failure, though it brazes the mark so often throughout its pages. It crafts an understanding of the phrase "too little, too late", which becomes the main focus of the entire story. Heathcliff did not stir this on his own, at least not entirely; he is abused and neglected after his adoptive father passes, outcasted and named a "g*psy" and "bastard" due to his uncertain heritage. He resents most of his house mates, excluding the girl who opened- and tore- his heart: Catherine Earnshaw. Readers learn and discover the truth about Heathcliff through memories recalled by Nelly, the house maid, a majority of the time. By the end, one is left wondering whether they pity, love, or hate Heathcliff, leaving many with a sense of familiar dread (this time, in literature rather than reality). The purposeful writing of Brontë is revealed again and again, but never more so than when one analyzes her incredible skill for building characters. This book is disturbing at times, and I admit it; but this aspect adds depth and truth to an otherwise perfect novel. It has become my favourite book, and one I will recommend to others as long as I have strength to speak. The year that I first read it was the year I reread it 15-16 other times. It truly has a certain magnetism that pulled me towards it, and for that reason, I give it a 5 star rating.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent novel, and I really enjoyed it! I highly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    This novel exists in two texts: that written and published by Emily, and Charlotte's revised edition. I can't remember which version I read first time around, but this time I read the original and I don't see anything in it that needs to be changed. That said, I did find the character of Joseph to be virtually unintelligible. I understand Charlotte partially translates his dialogue so get her version if you must understand everything he says, or get a copy with notes.Happily, someone has invented the internet since I last read this. I remember getting very confused as to who was related to who and how, and really, you need to know to realise the import of what Heathcliff is doing. These days you can find a variety of family trees on tinternet… though none that I found showed Heathcliff as being related by blood to anyone else. But come one, old Mr Earnshaw comes home with Heathcliff and a story about how he found him in the street. Pull the other one mate. Heathcliff and Catherine are obviously half-siblings.Lots going on in the novel. I can see why it's so richly studied. I get the impression it's one of those books that doesn't give up all its interpretations at one. What I found particularly interesting was the idea of the interloper that's played out again and again throughout. Not just Heathcliff, but everyone who comes to the Grange and the Heights, including the narrator; and also the way the servants intrude into the private lives of their employers.
  • (2/5)
    This is one of those classics that I've never rread, and now I know why. I thought I knew the3 story since I've seen the 1939 movie starring Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon probably 50 times. But, of course, Hollywood left a lot out when they made the film.The movie is a Gothic tale of obsessive love, and maybe the physical beauty of the stars who played Kathy and Heathcliff, covered over what to me, is just a sick story of feminine submission and male abuse. The prose if over wrought and the plot, especially in the last third of the book just defies belief. Forget the novel & watch the movie.
  • (5/5)
    Wuthering Heights has been in my consciousness ever since the 70's when Kate Bush was wailing out her high pitched ethereal lyrics -Out on the wiley, windy moorsWe'd roll and fall in green.You had a temper like my jealousy:Too hot, too greedy.How could you leave me, When I needed to possess you?I hated you. I loved you, too. I watched the TV adaptaion with Tom Hardy some years ago and still have vague recollections of it - mostly of Tom Hardy's brooding gorgeousness. And as I have said before seeing any tv or film adaptation before reading the book for me is a mistake. When I first started reading I found myself trying to link in the story to what I had seen and thought I already knew which detracted somewhat for allowing the story to unfold.What surprised me most on reading was it wasn't all about Cathy and Heathcliff as my memory had held it. So much of this tale is about the children of the initial characters. If there is any place for pathetic fallacy in literature then Wuthering Heights is the perfect venue. Not only does the weather provide the sometimes wild, sometimes brooding, sometimes oppressive atmosphere of the book but for me it is also a metaphor for the characters themselves. Many like myself come to the story thinking it will be a tale of love and passion only to discover that the pervading emotions are childish petulance and hatred and revenge. I have learnt much about life and love in nearly half a century on the planet and one thing I have learnt is that, when it comes to human relationships, hate is not the opposite of love - apathy is. So for me there is still more love in the story than hatred. It just manifests itself in an immature way. When I think of Heathcliff then the word repression comes to mind. I was once told that Wuthering Heights is best read when young and I can see why - there is for me is an immaturity in Cathy Earnshaw's behaviour in particular.The amazing thing for me about Wuthering Height's is held in the author herself - how on earth did a young woman in victorian England come up with all of this? The initial reviews of the book were not favourable and critics thought it morally reprehensible drivel. I need to find out more about Emily Bronte and her life and experiences - ooh a trip to Haworth when I am next back up in the Motherland. I have the 1939 film adaptation waiting with Larry O and Merle Oberon which I will watch with interest - although a more unlikely Heathcliff I cannot imagine. And a final note - having seen Tom Hardy digging up Cathy from her grave to embrace her again like a deranged lunatic ( my favourite scene ) I was eaer for it to come up in the book - it was there at last, so very near the end although the writing of it a very different less urgent account than the one I experienced in viewing.
  • (4/5)
    Loved it, Heathcliff is a wonderful broken villain. Incredible the atmospheric analogies between the landscape and the characters - everything's dark, hopeless and obsessive. Only the ejaculations of Joseph are a real challenge for a non-native speaker.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent novel, and I really enjoyed it! I highly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Wonderfully Overwrought - Confusingly Incestuous
  • (3/5)
    Krachtig verhaal, 2de helft iets minderGedragen door passies: liefde en wraakThema’s van de civilisatie versus natuur en instinct, romantiek-elementen (storm, park, moors, spoken en dromen)Donkere stijl door suggestieve bijvoegelijke naamwoorden; alleen op het einde: zon barst door de wolken.)
  • (5/5)
    A great classic.
  • (3/5)
     Yawn. Truly uninspiring.
  • (3/5)
    Wuthering Heights tells the tortured story of Catherine Earnshaw, the orphan Heathcliff, and the people who surround them. The story depicts a stark environment that surrounds the two soul mates and the passion that destroys almost everyone.

    Wuthering Heights, published in 1847, was the only novel written by Emily Bronte. It is classified as a Victorian Gothic novel, with a strong leaning toward Byronic Romanticism. Indeed, this novel is the epitome of a Gothic Romance- tortured souls, regret, a love that surpasses time. At the time of its publishing, it was met with mixed reviews. However, in the 20th century, it was deemed a superior classic.

    Emily Bronte was a masterful writer, who seems almost more in line with modern writers than those of her day. Wuthering Heights is the true model for the tortured love stories that seem to dominate the media these days. Heathcliff and Cathy are the ultimate tortured soul mates- one of the most well-known lines is when Cathy declares she is Heathcliff- meaning that they cannot live without the other.
    Heathcliff proves this when his life becomes a shell when she is gone. He allows the worst parts of himself to take over and treats everyone around him worse than he was treated as a child.

    I wasn't expecting to like this novel as much as I did. I tried to read it in high school, but couldn't get very far. I'd seen the movie with Laurence Olivier and thought the characters were insipid. A friend of mine and I were talking one day in April about classics and she wanted to read this, so I agreed to try it again. Boy, was I surprised. I literally couldn’t put the novel down. This book proves to me that everything deserves a second chance.
  • (3/5)
    No book has made me more grateful to have been born in the latter half of the 20th century. The writing was fine, and the story moved along, but good lord, I wanted to slap every single character upside the head at some point in the novel. Nelly, 3 weeks in bed after a walk that got her shoes and hose wet?? Catherine, who swoons, then rebounds, then swoons again based on a raised eyebrow or not very sharp word?? Don't get me started on Linton.
  • (5/5)
    Seldom must a book have differed between its commonly held perception and its actuality, as much as Wuthering Heights. I came to this book from the camp of the former with some reservations about some doomed love affair on the Yorkshire moors. Perhaps the realisation of how far removed any preconceptions were added to the subsequent enjoyment of the story.

    Wuthering Heights is a story of revenge fed by obsession crossing over the generations of two families. And it is much more gothic than romantic. The plot rolls along with the drama rising and falling. Ok, few if any of the characters elicit much sympathy but they are complex and so well drawn that it is difficult not to be drawn into their isolated world or to anticipate what happens next.

    Ultimately it's all madness. Grave tampering madness.
  • (1/5)
    I love classic literature, and finally decided to give this one a try. It was awful - such a terrible book! I couldn't even finish it. About halfway through I declared myself done with it. Clearly not all the Bronte sisters should have been writers.
  • (1/5)
    This book has so much hype so I expected it to be amazing. Boy was I let down! I didn't really care for this book at all. And people say Heathcliff and Catherine's love was so epic, but he was a horrible person who did nothing but torment others. I don't know, maybe I just didn't get it, but I wasn't impressed in the slightest.
  • (4/5)
    This is a story of the Earnshaw and the Linton family who are quite isolated in their homes of Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange. The homes represent the opposition that exists throughout the novel. There is a lot of death in the book but there is also the hopeful happy ending. That being said, I did feel the ending was a little bit off for me. The sudden decline and death of Heathcliff didn't make sense as it was presented. I see the need for the author to kill him off, I just didn't feel that the way made any sense. The novel is also told through the voice of a stranger who takes up a temporary residence and observes this dysfunctional family and the servant who has lived since childhood with these children.
  • (5/5)
    This book is beautiful, ugly, and upsetting. It's probably best to read over a rainy weekend with lots of comfort food... I'm not usually a fan of historical romances, especially in this time period, but Wuthering Heights is the exception. This is no prim and proper story about high society goings-on; these characters are broken, mistakes are made, and pride and anger really do have consequences. She chooses society over love (or perhaps over her own nature); he chooses revenge and pride. Both suffer for it.
  • (5/5)
    I refuse to review this title, but I can say its one of my favorites and not just because of twisted dark romance, but the sheer elegance of the writing and the topic which was shocking for the time period.
  • (4/5)
    A most unusual novel. Dark tale of wretched and unlikable characters, of a tormented and bold - yet unable to change his fate subjected to his time (the Victorian England) - tragic soul and his other-worldly passionate and dark love relationship, with vengeful, selfish or pathetic actions, obsessions and great tragedy, which is irritating and painful while reading; but somehow turns into a fluffy(?!), moderately sunny and comforting ending.

    Not quite pleasant and easy to read but definitely one of the most thought-provoking after: it is compelled to read it more than once.

    No. It's not about love. And it certainly is not a romance! Cathy and Heathcliff's relationship is much more complicated, messy and profound than a simple romantic love.

    On another note, has anyone been "vexed" by the narrative of this story as I was? The choice of the narrator has left much to be desired, too ambiguous and unrealiable to my liking, which, in a positive way, gives the readers the freedom to interpret as well, obviously.
  • (4/5)
    Wuthering Heights is known as a gothic romance. I do not consider it a romantic story. It is dark, and "disagreeable", and utterly fascinating. It is difficult to feel sympathy for any of the characters, yet the story stays in your mind long after you finish it. What was this character's motivation? Why did that happen? What if.... Could it be.... One is compelled to reflect on human nature and the author's goals in telling the story.
  • (5/5)
    "Wuthering Heights" is a writer's novel. The twists and turns of its frame narrative style, along with the reincarnation of Heathcliff's love and vengeance on so many different (but similarly named) instantiations of their initial targets, leave the reader constantly wondering who is talking, who is being talked about, and why more of the characters don't just speak for themselves. In a masterful way, this confusion calls out the subjugation inherent in Brontë's own society. The author shrieks back at a world that relegated women to subservience, and that on occasion dismissed her own and her sister Anne's writing as likely the product of their sister Charlotte's imagination, by voicing the eternity of her characters' hearts through the words of others. This, metaphorically, is what her writing did for her, and what all great writing does for its author. On first reading, the narrative structure consumed all of my attention, but left me entranced by its power. On second reading, ten years later, I vowed to focus on the characterisation of the novel and discovered some of the most unlikeable and least relatable personalities that literature has ever produced. This is not a book club read for gabbing with your girlfriends, but a manifesto on the power of words to haunt the minds of generations. I linger on Brontë's writing, and wonder how any one could ever imagine quiet slumbers for an author who continues to speak so powerfully today.The Barnes and Noble edition of this book contains a selection of famous quotations, a timeline of Brontë's life, an introduction by Daphne Merkin, a note on the text and dialect, a genealogical chart of the characters, the original biography of Ellis and Acton Bell and the editor's preface to the 1850 edition of the book written by Currer Bell (Charlotte Brontë), footnotes (of dialect and translation) and endnotes, an exploration of works inspired by the novel, a set of critical opinions and questions for the reader, and a suggested bibliography for further reading.
  • (4/5)
    > In Lord John and the Private Matter, Lord John opines that honour sacrificed on the altar of love renders the love dishonourable and the lesser of pure lust. Heathcliff’s love for Catherine is an example of just such dishonourable love and is hardly the stuff of any romantic sensibility nor of the philosophical bent of Nietschze (“Beyond good and evil there is love.”) Heathcliff’s feeling for Catherine is egocentric, destructive and, a fearful thing not unlike the wuthering moors. Like the twisted tangles of brush that somehow manage to survive on the moors, the people that come into contact with Heathcliff are bowed and bent under the sheer force of his will, passion and temper. The idea of such an unrelenting, aggressive and unsparing devotion is both shocking and frightening. Beyond the linear narrative, this novel merits re-examination (re-reading) for its dense language, its allegorical associations and, the ideas about human nature itself.
  • (5/5)
    I still consider this one of my favorite books, possibly of all time, and that just further solidifies with each reread. One of the easier 'classic' novels to read, at least in my opinion. Cathy Heathcliff are my model couple for crazy love, and then Cathy 2.0 Hareton are a prime example of opposites attracting. Ahhhh I seriously just love this dark, twisted little book, plain and simple.
  • (5/5)
    It is difficult to describe my feelings for this book, really. The changes from the start to the middle, from the middle to the end are so astounding they have changed the rating I was going to give it several times.

    For the start to the middle, or rather, to Catherine Linton’s death, I would have given this book four stars. I got really immersed in her writing, and all the characters were wonderfully developed – each had its own personality and background. The only complaint I had whilst reading it was that Heathcliff really needed to learn how to let Catherine go – like Rochester let Jane go.

    From Catherine Linton’s death to her daughter’s marriage with Linton, I would’ve given this book three stars. The writing style was still brilliantly captivating, but all the characters appeared to be so twisted to me: Heathcliff with his obsession on Catherine Linton even after her death, and his desire to gain Edgar Linton’s properties; Linton with his pathetic protests and cowardly personality; Catherine who goes against her housekeeper’s wishes even when it is obvious her actions can result in no good. It seemed to me that this was the part where Emily was demonstrating the worst of human characteristics: greed, hatred, anger, spitefulness et cetera et cetera.

    For the last part, five stars, definitely. I loved how everything got together, how Hareton finally learns to read and Catherine overcomes her spitefulness towards him. The two of them deserved their happy ending together, and I’m glad that Heathcliff finally found solace, even if it was in death. The changes in personalities were astounding, really, because there appeared to be no major event happening to cause such a change, but I’m glad for it nonetheless.

    Mrs. Dean and Joseph were probably the characters that didn’t really change dramatically throughout the entire story. Mrs. Dean remains the loyal housekeeper she was at the start, and Joseph still retains his swearing and obsession with the Bible at the end, and that really bound the story together, in my opinion.

    I found this book really relatable despite the fact that it was written 1800; greed, hatred, and the general ugliness of the human character has always been universally acknowledged to be timeless themes that would hold true anywhere, anytime.
  • (5/5)
    Masterpiece of English literature. Gothic, mysterious, enthralling. Unforgettable characters (Heathcliff and Catherine), unforgettable landscapes, violent love. First got it as a gift, in Portuguese, but waited to buy it in English and read the original. I usually avoid translations whenever I can - and, in this case, it would have been a crime to read a translation.
  • (5/5)
    Though, in my opinion, not as great as Jane Eyre, I will say this is one book that people should read to explore the darkest of human nature. This tragic gothic romance really is piercing and haunting. Though this is not the love story that will gripe you and make you want more, it does show how dark love and passion can get. The characters do throw "tantrums" and make you want to go up to them and shake them or slap them into realization that they are acting stupid. However, this is their story, and the reader will learn how passions and emotions can control how a person acts.The main character is not the loveable, dark and dreamy kind of hero that girls swoon over. He is very anti-heroic and very cruel. But there is something about him and the abusive relationships that he creates around him that makes you want to keep on reading, not out of pittance or because one might like cruelty or anti-feminism, but because you will have the hope that things will change and turn around for the better.I would recommend this book, however with a warning that the reader will either hate or love it. I would recommend however that the reader look at the book critically instead of for a thrilling read. The story really illustrates and gives examples on how dangerous and pure love can be and especially how different love can be to different people.
  • (4/5)
    Having read and loved this book when I was about 14, I decided that 17 years later a reread could be in order.

    To be honest I struggled, a lot, at the start. While there is no denying how well written it is, it's all so unrelentingly depressing. However I perservered and came to remember why I loved it so much. All the moodiness, madness and passion is still there and that's why I loved it.

    I'm happy to say it remains one of the most atmospheric books I've ever read.

    That being said I imagine it will be another 17 years before I even think about venturing back to the Heights!