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Shatter Me

Shatter Me

Автор Tahereh Mafi

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Shatter Me

Автор Tahereh Mafi

оценки:
4/5 (586 оценки)
Длина:
408 страниц
5 часов
Издатель:
Издано:
Nov 15, 2011
ISBN:
9780062085511
Формат:

Описание

The gripping first installment in New York Times bestselling author Tahereh Mafi’s Shatter Me series.

One touch is all it takes. One touch, and Juliette Ferrars can leave a fully grown man gasping for air. One touch, and she can kill.

No one knows why Juliette has such incredible power. It feels like a curse, a burden that one person alone could never bear. But The Reestablishment sees it as a gift, sees her as an opportunity. An opportunity for a deadly weapon.

Juliette has never fought for herself before. But when she’s reunited with the one person who ever cared about her, she finds a strength she never knew she had.

And don’t miss Defy Me, the shocking fifth book in the Shatter Me series!

Издатель:
Издано:
Nov 15, 2011
ISBN:
9780062085511
Формат:

Об авторе

Tahereh Mafi is the New York Times bestselling author of the Shatter Me series which has been published in over 30 languages around the world. She was born in a small city somewhere in Connecticut and currently resides in Santa Monica, California, with her husband, Ransom Riggs, fellow bestselling author of Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children, and their young daughter. She can usually be found overcaffeinated and stuck in a book.


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4.2
586 оценки / 216 Обзоры
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  • (4/5)
    Read the full review hereA wonderful, gripping read that I tore through in under three hours. Shatter Me is a different kind of dystopian novel, set some ten years after the collapse of human society due to climate change, fuel shortages etc. The story is riveting - starting with Juliette’s isolation and then slowly revealing the circumstances under which she was imprisoned. I think this is a great way of telling the story because it hooks the reader in.Juliette is an interesting character because her isolation has made her borderline insane. She is deeply untrusting and closed off to the world (and to be honest I can’t blame her). Her disjointed thoughts and damaged thought process are effectively portrayed by alternating short, halting sentences with paragraph long sentences. Striked out sentences are also used to signify the thoughts that Juliette doesn’t want to have or doesn’t think she should have. It takes some time to get used to this writing style, but it’s worth it.
  • (5/5)
    This book blew me away.

    Shatter Me has undertones of dystopian fiction, but it is really its own entity. How do I explain this? Imagine that your favorite paranormal, superhero, and dystopian books were put into a blender to make one single book. That right there? That would be this book.

    Now I think it's important I start off with the writing style in Shatter Me because that seems to be the one thing that might keep people from falling in love with this gorgeous book. I'll admit, Tahereh Mafi's writing style is unlike anything I've read before. It's eerily prosaic, wonderfully descriptive, and oddly disconcerting, all at the same time. Replete with strikethroughs and repeated phrases, it feels sometimes like you might be going crazy yourself. I think it's important to remember that the reader is inside Juliette's head during the story. This is a girl who hasn't seen another person, hasn't touched another person, for what seems to her to be an endless amount of time. Being in Juliette's head can be off putting, or it can be beautiful. It all depends on how much you allow yourself to be immersed in the girl, and the world, that is built here.

    Juliette's character is what really brings Shatter Me to life. Constantly fighting a battle between the madness that she thinks still might consume her, and the giving person Adam knows her to be. Juliette is equal parts strong willed and vulnerable. The knowledge that her power can harm others cripples her, and she constantly wavers between feeling like a monster and a normal girl. Juliette truly has a power that can be used for good or evil, and both opportunities are presented to her. It might sound cliche at first glance, but I assure you that the girl on the pages is anything but that. Juliette's wariness at trusting others, her need to help even if she isn't sure if she should, her constant questioning of herself even when she's fairly sure that she is right, is all the product of her past. Tahereh Mafi builds up a girl who is believable and unique wrapped into one package. Juliette isn't perfect, and I loved her for that.

    Shatter Me is definitely dsytopian, and the world that is built around Juliette's story is amazing. Cities crumble to the ground in the wake of The Reestablishment. People cower in doorways as what is left of society is patrolled, and essentially owned, by the soldiers who are loyal to the movement. The explanation as to how this came about hit very close to home for me. To say that this world is possible, well that's an understatement. I won't spoil anything, but I will say that there is a distinct possibility we really could get to that point. It made me ponder that, and that made me fall even further under the spell of this book.

    If you can't tell from my musings above, I fell madly in love with this story. Devouring 120 pages in half an hour let me know that I was in for the long haul. I admit that I know that it won't be for everyone. As I mentioned, the writing style is different and might put some people off. However I can honestly say that if you give it a chance, if you allow yourself to fall wholeheartedly into Juliette's world, you might just find a story that will immerse you like it did me. Shatter Me is a refreshingly unique read that I enjoyed thoroughly. If there is indeed a sequel coming, I can't wait!
  • (3/5)
    I quite enjoyed this book and liked the almost lyrical nature of the the writing style. I also liked the phrases that were crossed out as it gave the reader an insight into Juliette's inner-most thoughts. At times, though, the use of metaphors annoyed me and I found that there were parts that were overly descriptive to the detriment of the action and character development that should have been included."Shatter Me" reminded me a little of "Graceling" by Kristin Cashore. Both female protagonists being killing machines, but I felt Juliette lacked the feistiness and sassiness of Kasta although I think she has the potential to become so in the next book. The romance between Juliette and Adam is corny and mushy, and the girls will love it. With a cliff-hanger ending, I will be looking forward to the sequel.
  • (5/5)
    Another really great read! I wasn't expecting it to be so good! I have had this one on my list for a long time now. When I started to read it I realized I couldn't even remember what it was about! I was surprised to read it was a dystopian novel. I haven't read on in quite awhile so it worked out! I'm really interested in seeing where this story goes and how things develop. I especially love the relationship between Adam and Juliette. I love that they have a really great history so it doesn't make it so much of the instant love.
  • (4/5)
    3.75 stars. I enjoyed this overall, even though I found the beginning a bit slow. There were parts of the book that I found quite beautiful. The following quote is my favourite:

    “I spent my life folded between the pages of books.
    In the absence of human relationships I formed bonds with paper characters. I lived love and loss through stories threaded in history; I experienced adolescence by association. My world is one interwoven web of words, stringing limb to limb, bone to sinew, thoughts and images all together. I am a being comprised of letters, a character created by sentences, a figment of imagination formed through fiction.”


    I found her style of writing quite interesting, the strike outs were different, suggesting her desperation at the bleakness of her surroundings, the loss of freedom etc. The line a stark, black strike through, like a prisoner counting off their time in captivity. Interesting.

    Will definitely read the second in the series. Great titles too, and fantastic art work on the cover - love the eye!

  • (4/5)
    I had been putting starting this series as I thought I was going to hate it. I was wrong! I am not normally a fan of Science Fiction and Dystopian, but I ended up enjoying the plot on this one.I was intrigued with the story right away, especially with Juliette being imprisoned. However; I was not a huge fan of the writing style or the scratch off sections. This did not come off as a journal, so to me it did not make sense. I know Juliette is carrying a journal, but the story is not written from the POV of the journal. I did not think it brought anything to the story, and I could have gone without these parts. I also do not love when words are reported over and over again in a sentence. The author did that very often.I ran through the first few chapters, then did not feel like picking it back up as it slowed down. I started reading this in physical copy and then switched to audio to help get through the middle. I ended up loving it on audio, and recommend giving it a try if you have been wanting to read this. I think the narrator for the audiobook brought the character and emotion to life, and I enjoyed her.I know others had issues with the lack of the development within the world. I actually liked that it was not complicated or something that half the book described. I did not have a hard time understanding the world. The ending reminded a lot of The Hunger Games. Hoping the rest of the series is as good and does not go downhill like the Hunger Games though.
  • (5/5)
    Juliette has spent the last 264 days locked in a cell for accidentally killing a young boy. Her touch is lethal, painfully draining the life from anyone she touches. Because of this, her parents hated her, people feared her and kids at school picked on her. Juliette thought life outside the prison cell was bad enough. Food is limited, animals are almost extinct, people are starving and birds can no longer be seen flying in the sky. The Reestablishment regime has taken over, planning to rebuild the world. They plan to do away with everything from the world before – essentially wiping out history – starting fresh, creating a new language and a new way of living.When Adam is locked up with Juliette, he looks familiar to her for some reason, but she can’t quite remember why. Her mind isn’t the same since they put her away. The more time she spends with Adam, the more she trusts him, and eventually she realizes how she knows him, but does he remember her?When Juliette and Adam are forcefully taken from their cell, Juliette learns that the Reestablishment has plans for her. They want to use her as a weapon to aid them in ridding the world of anyone who fights back against them. But, Juliette isn’t easily swayed. She won’t be a killer. She will fight back, and in the process she will learn her powers are much stronger than she realized.I tore through this book in a day. The prose is lyrical and hypnotizing, though the similes and metaphors tend to run wild at times. Ms. Mafi gives Juliette a very distinct voice which makes the novel even more captivating. I loved the mix of dystopia, romance and paranormal elements, and I loved the characters. Juliette’s fear, mistrust and mental anguish are perfectly balanced with her need to be loved and understood. Adam is the perfect romantic lead and I really liked the relationship he and Juliette have. I can’t wait for the next book!
  • (5/5)
    What is it like to feel different? weird? UNIQUE. Juliette is a girl; a girl who can't be touched by another human being without inflicting pain on them. And she has been locked up for this. Until one day, she's released - under the condition that she be used as a weapon. But she has plans of her own.This book is about so much more than a girl who has supernatural powers. It's about what it's like to be considered "different" in society. And how you can overcome that feeling and find acceptance within yourself. It's about finding love and how that love can make anything possible. It can change the way you see yourself and the way you see the world.Tahereh Mafi's debut novel blew me away. I finished it in one sitting and found myself begging for the more at the end. And while I felt like the first half of the book was more character driven (which I liked a lot!), I LOVED the action-packed second half of the novel.If you loved The Hunger Games, you're going to gobble this one up!
  • (5/5)
    OH WOW DID I LOVE THIS! (Okay, caps are actually necessary here!) Juliette's spot-on, and with everything that's happened to her, I really felt the fine line of sanity she's walking on (with what she'd been through, it's a freaking miracle she's not nuts!). I loved that her internal dialogue belied her fear, weaknesses, everything, but on the outside she was tough as nails. And Adam--can I haz him? Please? Can't wait for the next book!
  • (4/5)
    I buddy read Shatter Me with Seann and Anna of YA Buddy Readers’ Corner ♥. I had fun, girls! Can’t wait to read more with you guys!♥♥♥♥♥♥♥Shatter Me is a book that has been on my TBR list for years, so I was excited—and terrified—to finally give it a shot. I have to say the experience was a real shock for me. It had all the classic hallmarks of a YA dud and it somehow became a book I couldn’t get enough of! What is the witchcraft?!While I was reading this book, I never would have expected to give Shatter Me a rating above three stars. Let me explain why:Purple. Prose. Oh god, guys, I had a real hard time with it in the beginning. It seemed like every sentence was flowery nonsense this and stupid metaphors this.Now, it’s totally fine here and there (well, sort of…) and I love a good metaphor as much as the next person, but after five chapters of nonstop flowery writing I just wanted to GET ON WITH THE STORY ALREADY.Insta-love! I wasn’t as butt hurt about the insta-love as I was about the purple prose, but I wasn’t sold on it (at first). I had so many doubts about Juliette and Adam. View Spoiler »The dreaded love triangle! Y’all know I am not a fan of these. They are messy, overly dramatic page-fillers.So how does this train-wreck turn into a solid four star review? Yes, the purple prose was hella annoying and I had a ton of doubts about Juliette and Adam as a couple (I kind of still do), but there was just so much more to enjoy about this book. By the time I had finished it, I knew I wouldn’t be able to just stop at book one.The characters were mesmerizing and shrouded in mystery (especially the ones that seemed unimportant to the story and the plot, but more on those later).Juliette is your typical Cinderella-esque YA heroine. Juliette is ignored, abused, hated, and tossed in a cell in insane asylum and left to die, until one day a beautiful hunk is tossed in with her and everything changes. It was hard not to feel for Juliette. In fact, I’m not sure I’ve pitied a fictional character more (okay, maybe Acheron, but he’s a whole ‘nother story). It was heartwarming to watch her learn to embrace her differences and to see her powers not as a curse or a disease, but as a way to fight back against the Reestablishment. I couldn’t help but cheer her on! And for being a depressed heroine (for good reason), she wound up being surprisingly funny at times.I had conflicting emotions for both Adam and Warner all throughout the novel. It wasn’t always clear which one was the good guy and which one was the bad guy, and I kind of enjoyed it. My feelings were really wishy-washy, because with every new reveal about their pasts, I had a dozen more questions. In the end, there was a clear bad guy and I finally got some much-needed answers about Adam’s past. Warner’s past is still a total mystery, and the girls and I agreed that we NEED MORE WARNER! Or at the very least, we need his back story.My all time favorite character? At first, he appeared to be a largely unimportant character to the plot, but he wound up being crucial to the plot. Kenji was a big, lovable goofball and pretended to be dumber than he actually was, all for a genius reason that you’ll just have to find out for yourself. :) I’m guessing he will have a bigger part in book two, and I absolutely can’t wait!Another reason this book wound up a winner, is because Mafi made me question everything I knew to be true about this book. At first, the writing did not impress me, but in the end, I couldn’t question her talent any longer. The purple prose might have been a turn off at first, but she really threw me for a loop by the end of the book—several loops. I may have doubted her writing in the beginning, but the unreliable narration sold this book for me. Every time she revealed a plot twist or revealed an answer to my question, she proved how much I underestimated her ability to shock, amaze, and write a well-thought out novel. By the end of the book, nothing was as it seemed and I loved it!I’m glad I was able to look past the flaws, because if I hadn’t, I wouldn’t have been able to add it to my 2016 Favorite books! If you are a fan of flawed, but surprisingly twisted books, give Shatter Me a shot. You may not enjoy it as much as I did, but you’ll definitely feel something.
  • (4/5)
    Shatter Me is a dystopian novel featuring a female character named Juliette whose touch is fatal. After she accidentally kills a 4 year old boy, she is thrown into an institution, but the reader doesn't find out this back story for an aggravatingly long time. Although I generally enjoyed it, there were other annoyances that I had with the story such as the crossed out text. I'm pretty certain it represents thoughts Juliette feels she shouldn't be having but I didn't find the strike through effective. I just found them really annoying. The second annoying thing about the book was a plot line that allowed two powerful people to be searching for her for at least 264 days, but be unable to find her. Hmmmm. It was really slow to start for me, and I almost abandoned it, but I'm glad I stuck with it because I did enjoy the chemistry between Juliette and Adam, the hungriness of Warner, and the braggadocio of Kenji.
  • (4/5)
    Read from December 30 to 31, 2011I'm finished and I really like where it ended. Can't wait to read more! (Though I do wish the dystopian YA genre would give the love interest part a rest. Why does every girl have to fall in love with some good looking guy? Why can't she be strong and on her own?)Mid-Read Review:I'm currently halfway through the book and it's so good I don't want to stop reading. But I keep noticing tiny similarities between Juliette and Briony from Chime that I felt I must write it now (I just finished Chime so forgive me for making comparisons between two very different books). Both characters have a bit of self-loathing because of what others have told them their entire lives. They've got "gifts" that others see as bad things so they've learned to hate their gifts...and thus themselves a bit. The difference is in the storytelling though...Chime never really gave me a sense of time and place. I knew it was somewhere in England, not London, but somewhere and probably in the early twentieth century and they believed in witches (but Briony was kind of an unreliable narrator so I was never sure of anything).But I believe Juliette. Like Juliette, she has moments of overwhelming memory. There's a lot of stream of consciousness, but it isn't confusing, you just get it. And thankfully she doesn't ever discuss herself in the third person.
  • (5/5)
    Shatter Me is one of those books that you either love or hate, because of the style of writing. In my opinion, I loved it. Tahereh Mafi was able to make me feel like I was in Juliette's head. Which I adore! I read mostly to escape from my life, and this book was the perfect thing for that. The book is like Juliette's journal, with cross-outs and (as much as I hate to say it...) run-on sentences. But, they were intentional! (I hope.)As I said before, while reading this book, it felt like I was in Juliette's head, watching everything she saw through her eyes. As a character, I loved Juliette! She was both likeable and strong. She was not weak, although she was scared of the power she had. The voice was clear and it was enough to make me adore this novel. Speaking a bit more about characters, Adam is probably my favorite guy/hero/love-interest in the many books I have read in 2012! He cared so deeply for Juliette, accepted her for who she was. There were obviously some special circumstances surrounding those two, but I won't spoil it for anyone who hasn't read it yet! Then there's Warner, who is seriously captain creeps! I could see that he was in 'love' with Juliette, but I honestly believe that he was in love with her powers more than anything. He was bloodthirsty and trigger happy and just plain vicious!Then, there is the setting. As much of a post-apocaplyptic world it was, I didn't find anything special or different about it as opposed to other recent dystopian-type reads. There was a government taking over, the people were in distress, what else is new? Except for maybe the big emphasis on the military aspect to it, the 'world' wasn't anything special. I think that was the only main thing that disappointed me in the entire book, but it was such a small part of the actual story, the outside world I mean, that I don't really care too much about it! Seeing as I don't want to give anything away, I can't say much on what we do learn about it.It's strange, but as much as I loved this book, I don't actually have a lot more to say about it. It's not a book that I can easily explain my thoughts on for some reason. But, what I can say is that what I did absolutely, 100 % love about Shatter Me is that it clearly has a beginning, a middle and an end. Even though it is the first in a trilogy, it is it's own book. I think that the author did a great job in leaving us wanting more, but still satisfied with what we've got.
  • (4/5)
    Review courtesy of All Things Urban FantasyI could tell from the first page that there were going be people who didn’t like SHATTER ME. The writing is unusual bizarre crazy interesting. Because the story is told from the perspective of a girl who has basically been in solitary confinement for almost a year, her thoughts aren’t exactly what you’d call lucid. At least not initially. The pages are littered with crossed out hopes fears thoughts and lyrical descriptions that trend towards delirium at times. Unlike several of the reviews I’ve seen, I found it fascinating on just about every level.When we meet Juliette, she as close to crazy as you can get before the monsters get you. She’s torments by her past, half starved from lack of food and human interaction. She is a broken and tragic figure…and that’s before we even really learn why. It takes a new cellmate—her first ever—to draw Juliette back from the edge of insanity, and help show her the strength she possesses to fight back. The kissing scenes in this book are epic…I mean wow. They go on for pages, but never feel drawn out. I think I could read an entire book by Mafi that is just kissing scenes. It also made perfect sense that kisses would practically overwhelm this character since she’s spent almost her entire life devoid of human contact. In a lot of ways, SHATTER ME is a traditional superhero origin story, but it’s more than that too. It’s a really beautiful love story between two characters who grew up watching the suffering of the other and finding each other again in a pre-1984 world. It’s the story of corruption and power hungry groups that prey on a weak moment in human history and reshape it to suit themselves. And ultimately, it’s the story of a girl who has always been afraid of herself finally learning to see herself as something other than a monster. It’s a powerful, thought provoking story, written in a way that is uniquely suited to it’s protagonist. I can’t wait for the sequel.Sexual Content:Kissing. Scenes of mild sensuality
  • (4/5)
    I’ve heard from various sources that the main complaint they’ve had with this story was its being essentially 338 pages of set-up for the next book. We get introduced and well acquainted with some very strong and captivating characters but very little insight into what was actually going on. And yeah, that assessment is pretty much dead on, but it doesn’t mean that the story is short on awesome.When we begin Juliette believes herself to be a patient in an insane asylum. In her post apocalyptic world, resources, wildlife, safety and humanity amongst humans is growing increasingly rare. The remaining people are subject to a rigid military rule that leaves little tolerance for the unexplained and no one can explain Juliette. It is a complete mystery why the simple touch of her hand on another person can result in excruciating pain, so the world locks her away and forgets about her. Months later, Juliette is given a roommate, a young man named Adam with blue eyes that are unmistakably familiar to her. Adam is her first human contact in a long time and with him she tentatively begins to build a friendship that has her toying with the idea that she might not be crazy. And she’s right, she’s not in an asylum and she’s far from crazy- she’s a military experiment.Something happened with this book that hasn’t happened for several books now- it’s filled with dogeared pages marking some exemplary passages. Mafi’s writing is tinged throughout with moments of OMG, some had me pausing to reread, or take in what she was describing. There’s nothing I love more than having pages that I simply HAVE to go back and revisit. I felt Mafi’s writing was far superior to the actual story and she could have been telling me anything and I would have bought it.Juliette’s story is a scary one, and she’s not only scared for herself, she’s scared of herself. Where so many authors would take this opportunity to have their MC miraculously and heroically discover an untapped source of bravery and brawn, Mafi lets Juliette experience the terror of her situation just as she should. Not everyone with super powers is a hero. Not yet anyway. I prefer to think that in future installments, Juliette will come into her own gradually, as befits her personality.I’m still not sure what to make of Adam, our captor/hero/love interest. I’m not sold on him completely as he falls into the group of heroes particular to YA fiction in which he lets his love suffer “for her own good.” And he isn’t broody enough- you know how I like them.Final thoughts? We need more authors like Mafi in YA. You know, ones who can actually write. I can’t wait for the sequel and I’m really interested to see where Warner’s story goes. Underneath he’s desperately afraid of appearing weak and I almost think he feels he needs someone as powerful as Juliette to love him in order to validate his position- which could make a man very, very desperate.
  • (5/5)
    Shatter Me...Oh, Shatter Me! This book has me so confused! First off, I love this book. I love the world, the characters, and the writing. Anna is an amazing heroine. She is tough, caring, quiet, and yet you can tell there is something dark in her at times. Readers can really connect with her story and get the sense of just how alone she has been in the world all of her life. In regards to Anna, I thought I would find the cross out words annoying or distracting. They were the exact opposite. They offered the reader another way to connect to Anna's character; expressing not only her feelings, but her eventual transformation. Adam is also a likeable character. He is sweet, caring, and protective. However, there was another man that pushed his way into the spotlight, stole the show, and made me feel all together uncomfortable. Warner ...never have I ever liked such an absolutely despicable villain so much in my entire life. He is right up there with the king of literary villains, but something about him is so compelling. I must admit that I had to go online and google to see if I was the only "freak" who felt this way. Thankfully on Ms. Mafi's website she explains that this doesn't make me weird. The last character that really stood out to me is Kai. There is something about his shameless flirting that is highly appealing and I hope to see much more of him in the sequel. When writing a post-apocolyptic/ dystopian novel world building is one of the most important things a writer must get right. If readers can't picture the world, they can't connect to the book. The world that Shatter Me takes place in is absolutely brilliant! My only complaint is that I found this world so intriguing that I wish there had been much more background information on how it got that way and what is going on now. My last gushing point that Shatter Me does absolutely fabulous on is the violence! I love a book that gets down and dirty with the fighting. Shatter Me's violence and darkness is what turns a good book into a great one!. The second installment can't come soon enough for me.
  • (2/5)
    Ack. I wish this was better. Mafi makes some interesting literary moves (redaction, etc) & there are moments of enjoyable writing but ultimately this feels like a "paranormal teen romance." Weird to complain about a genre book being generic, but there you go. I want more.
  • (5/5)
    What I LovedEmotionsThere are so many emotions in all the words and descriptions I couldn't help but completely become very involved with the characters and the story. At first I wasn't so sure about the cross out text, but as the story progressed and we got to understand Juliette I came to enjoy her personal censorship.Characters Juliette: I'm very impressed with her character, in the beginning I was a little worried that I wouldn't care for her and that she might annoy me, thankfully that wasn't the case. I loved how strong of a character she is and even though she has gone through a lonely life she hasn't let that make her bitter and mean. Adam: I completely love love his character, he is going to be on my list of favorite boys in the YA genre. I love his passion, I love his compassion, his tenderness, and his complete devotion to the ones he loves.Warner: I really hope there aren't any Warner fans out there I read Tarereh's faq and one of the questions is "Is it wrong that I like Warner" In my opinion, yes! He is a freaking fanatical psychotic nut job, but he does make for a great obsessive villainous character. Sorry to all you Warner fans out there, he has a lot of redemption to make up to become a likable character in my eyes. RomanceWOW, just awesome romance. The romance was a perfect blend of sweet, touching, intense and hot.What I Didn't Like I have to wait a whole year for the next book. I hate love hate love love/hate you fellow bloggers for making me read this book now, completely torture that I have to wait for more. At the same time the story is pretty amazing and I'm glad I didn't wait to read this one. I guess I am just going to have to re-read the books with each new book release.Recommendation Got to read this book.
  • (5/5)
    The cover caught my eye. The cover summary intrigued me. The writing style held me close. Without Tahereh Mafi's use of strikethrough, I don't think this book would have had a profound effect on me. I felt the angst of Juliette. I got to know what she was thinking. She brought me into the story. We all ramble when speaking, especially when emotional about a subject. We all have thoughts in our head that we don't express. We all say one thing, while thinking another. That's why Juliette was real. Let alone the partnership she had with Adam.One of my favorite reads of 2011!
  • (5/5)
    Okay, for someone who claims they don't like dystopian (me), I certainly enjoyed this book! Maybe the genre's growing on me. I do like the revolutionary ideas behind the genre, that's for sure. Shatter Me is an empowering novel about one girl's fight to stay true to herself. Juliette doesn't want to be a monster, even though society (including her own parents) treat her like she is. Shatter Me has well-developed characters and an intriguing plot. The world-building is lacking a bit, though. I wanted to hear more about what has happened to the world. I don't know how it felt to live in such a destroyed society. I know how it felt to be locked up and treated like a monster because that's what Juliette was going through, but she didn't know much about the state of the world. I'm assuming the world was extremely oppressive from what little I did learn about it, but I hope that Mafi builds this world up a bit more in the sequel. Juliette has to be one of the most unique main characters I've read about in a long time. Her narrative voice was extremely different from most female YA leading ladies. She was very much herself and unapologetic for that fact. That could be due to the fact that she'd been isolated her entire life, so she never cared what people thought. However, I really enjoyed seeing the world through her eyes. Things were a bit jumbled and eccentric, and she had a tendency to repeat words three times in a row. I thought that would have been annoying, but it wasn't. It was endearing. Mafi has almost a poetic quality to her writing, and Juliette's descriptions of things really captured that. Juliette was brave, strong, and caring. She didn't want to hurt people, and she felt awful when she was forced to or when she did accidentally. Juliette has a lot of potential to grow into an amazing character over these next few novels. She already grew quite a bit in Shatter Me. I can't wait to see what changes she goes through next. Adam is also pretty perfect. Sure he's flawed and doesn't always know what to do, but he means well. He's a caring person and wants to do what's best for those he loves. You certainly can't fault the guy for that. Also, I have a weakness for guys who have black hair and blue eyes, so that also put him on my good side. I really liked his character, and I can't wait to learn more about him and his and Juliette's past in the next book. Warren, on the other hand, is one of the most vile villains I've ever read. I seriously don't think the guy has a soul. I mean usually I love the tortured, misunderstood-seemingly-evil guy, but he is just too much. The things he does to Juliette are disgusting. He is a complete psychopath. I think the creepiest part about him is that there are people out there like him. Just look at the news. It's terrifying how realistic he is. I never wanted to get that close to someone like him. However, he does add a lot of suspense to this novel. I'm interested to see how he changes over the course of time and if he can redeem himself somehow.The plot is captivating and kept me hooked throughout the entire novel. I wanted to learn more about the world that Juliette lives in. Mafi did get a bit "causey" at times. She seemed to use her characters as mouthpieces to preach about her causes. I could be mistaken, but that's how it seemed. I agreed with most of her causes, though, so it didn't really bother me. I know a lot of people don't believe that authors should use books and characters to state their own views, but to me you're supposed to be honest to yourself and what you believe. If that includes using a character to discuss your beliefs, then that's fine. Basically Mafi just spoke out about oppression, absolute power, and careless behavior that destroyed the world. It's nothing religious or that controversial. I think we all can agree that something needs to be done about how the world is right now. Anyway, other than that, which may or may not bother you, the plot was excellent. The pacing is spot on, and the ending wraps up most of the questions raised in this novel while leaving room for the sequel. Overall, I'd recommend this book to anyone, whether or not they are dystopian fans because it's so much more than just another dystopian novel. It's a story about finding yourself and standing up for what you believe is right. It's a story about not compromising your beliefs no matter what selfish benefits may come your way if you do. It's a story about love and loss and hope, and it will stick with you for a long time. Shatter Me is one of those unforgettable novels that burrows into your heart and refuses to let go. You do not want to miss this book.
  • (5/5)
    Pathetically insanely hard to shut, Shatter Me will make you want to flip through the pages at an alarmingly high speed.One touch is all it takes for Juliette kill destroy anyone. An abandoned child as a result of her dangerous unusual ability, Juliette is thrown by her parents into a new, cold, horrible different world, controlled by the Reestablishment, an entity claiming working towards making the world a better place. In the 4 walls of her cell, she accidently stumbles upon her love since childhood, Adam. Adam has also faced deadly terrifying problems as a child and has grown up to be one of the few people retaining their humanity. Trapped in the vicious cycle of a hard life and fateful death created by Warner- head of the Reestablishment- Adam and Juliette become obviously inseparable and overcome tons of obstacles to save the life of Adam’s younger brother, James and so many others. There then comes another Institution that is trying to actually, really do something about the current horrible conditions. This is where Castle, head of Omega Point comes into the picture along with secret agent and Adam’s friend, Kenji (who is gorgeous fun to have around). Along with the help of everyone at Omega Point, Juliette and other like her out there will try to control their abilities and use it for some heroic good deeds.Shatter Me is a fast- paced, immensely gripping story about a cold world, where people with weird unusual abilities reside. A battle to save civilization and humanity, the book is a spectacular read, counting the interesting strikethroughs. Something you should not even think about giving a miss.Go ahead, prepare to be shattered immersed in this cool read!
  • (3/5)
    VOYA Rating: 3Q 4PRecommended – additional purchaseJuliette has been locked up by the Reestablishment and is on the verge of losing her sanity. She has no human contact, until one day and boy is thrown into her cell. Juliette recognizes the boy, Adam, from school. They do not acknowledge this connection for fear of punishment. But Adam is the only person who has ever been nice to Juliette. Her parents and society want nothing to do with her. All of a sudden she is let out of her cell and swept up to the highest ranks of the Reestablishment. Warner, who is 19, is in charge of the military and responsible for getting Juliette out of prison. In exchange, he wants her to help him keep his power. Juliette begins to realize the extent of her power and begins to fall in love with Adam. Fortunately, Adam is part of the resistance and they come up with a plan to run away. The story unravels betrayal, action and romance. As she accepts the Resistance, she is provided with a suit that allows her to touch other people. She begins to hone her new found power in a positive way after she refuses to use it for evil.This book is set in a dystopian nation after environmental and political power grabbing have destroyed the planet. The military based Reestablishment has a firm grip on solders and civilians. Warner rules by instilling fear. The story starts out in this dystopia and ends on a more comic book like note. Perhaps the 2nd book will clear up some of the left over questions. It seemed that some elements of X-Men played into the story and Juliette began to resemble Rogue. After some discussions with my art teacher, she said that re-appropriation is a post-modern technique that many artists use. So, perhaps it stood out to me because I wasn’t expecting the ending. It could be a good thing? The style of writing was unique. Juliette’s thoughts were crossed out, but you could still read them. The things she said out loud were not what she was thinking. So, that was pretty unique and worth mentioning. I enjoyed the romance and the fast paced action in the 2nd half of the book. I would recommend it to high school students and have placed a copy in my library. I also found the publisher book trailer and emailed out to all my students in an effort to get them to read this book.
  • (5/5)
    Any contact with Juliette’s skin causes instant pain which can lead to death and no one knows why. When her touch accidentally kills a toddler, she is locked up by The Reestablishment, a group who has come to power by convincing everyone that their way is the only way to fix things. With the world falling apart and thousands dying of disease and starvation, it is easy for the hopeless to believe. After 264 days of being locked in an asylum with absolutely no human contact, Juliette is finally let out--but what awaits her is worse than being in that concrete room. Warner, the son of the man in charge of The Reestablishment, wants to use her power as a weapon in the war he believes is coming, but Juliette wants nothing to do with his plan to turn her into a killing machine.I love the concept of this and found it really refreshing. I don’t think I’ve ever read a book about people with powers that didn’t involve werewolves, vampires, etc (which I’m getting rather bored of). As for the plot, I felt like everything happened rather quickly--not necessarily in a bad way though. This is an action packed book that holds your attention from start to finish. I was blindsided quite a bit which is always great since I’ve become quite good at guessing what’s going to happen next. My favorite thing about Shatter Me was definitely the characters. Juliette had a rough childhood and for 17 years was used to people being terrified of her and calling her a freak. It was great seeing her go from being withdrawn and insecure to confident and courageous. She almost becomes an entirely new person by the end; the kind and caring girl from the beginning is still there, just much stronger. Mafi depicts Juliette’s voice perfectly, especially at the beginning of the novel with all of the strikethrough when she feels the most alone and is trying to hide her emotions. The writing is truly amazing and like nothing I’ve read before.Adam is caring, smart, and extremely mature for his age; he has had to deal with so much at such a young age. Their romance is really sweet and he is one of the biggest reasons for Juliette’s change. And then there’s Warner who is just in love with the idea of her. He is the definition of obsessed and it’s a bit frightening. But...is it bad that I kind of almost maybe liked Warner a little bit? I have no idea what it is about him...I kept having to remind myself that he was the bad guy. Last, but certainly not least, is Kenji. I feel like every book needs a Kenji, especially if it’s a book about running for your life. He is hilarious; even with a bullet in his leg he still manages to crack jokes. I can’t wait to see more of him in the sequel, Unravel Me.
  • (5/5)
    Welcome to Shatter Me, please, enjoy the ride and don't forget to take your bag of hope before you leave! Ready? Come with me, please.Facts:- I read it in one night and one morning. Not because I wanted to stop but because I had had a rough day and couldn't keep my eyes open.- I wanted to hug Juliette after reading the first page and keep her safe.- I told my husband about the book and after that he kept sending me messages to know what was going on. Which I found hilarious and sweet.- The characters were so real...Juliette has been trapped in a cell for 264 after a homicide she didn't want to do... but it happened and she was convinced that, without her the world would be safer secure. Besides? She never had a real friend or the love of her parents who often remembered her that she was a freak, an abomination that couldn't be their daughter.With nothing awaiting her outside and a world where a group called The Reestablishment had taken the control her hopes were none. To begin with, this group proclaimed that they wanted to help the world reach a better place, find answers for the problems that were raising with Mother Earth and take care of the people.And looks like, with nothing better to choose, we chose them.Big mistake. Ever.All they did was slave people, kill the rebels and use their power to terrorize everybody.But the hope of our heroine began to blossom again when a new roommate entered her life. Another human being, probably a lunatic, was with her, in the same room, a boy. And... somehow, she remembered him from somewhere.What began as a scary situation developed into a pure love that would change their world completely.That is until Juliette realized that Adam was only spying on her and that a handsome but cruel boy wanted to use her to torture and kill people.Personal opinion:I have to admit, at the beginning it was hard to follow Juliette's thoughts because she kept repeating words, phrases, crossing out things she wanted to say but was afraid to do so.And then Tahereh caught me in the world she had created for Juliette and didn't let me go.Soon I realized that the way Juliette thought was authentic, her own personality trying to break free from the prison that her life had become. The transition we share with her during the book allow us to see, with our own eyes, how her confidence improves, how she begins to say what she really thinks and that she is not longer afraid of being authentic.What I loved most about her? She is strong. Truly strong. I picture her as a phoenix who, doesn't matter how many times you hurt her and try to destroy her, she will rise again, strong and beautiful, with her hopes intact.The world chose to hate her? Fine. She understood that but she would never hurt anyone on purpose. And that defines her very well.Adam will also enchant you with his charisma. He is simply amazing, a true gentleman, a kind soul that always looked out for Juliette. His side of the story is very important and you will also develop strong feeling towards him. Their relationship was fire and steam because, somehow, he could... Well, no spoilers, you know me ;)And, of course, I can't forget our bad guy: Warner. It's rare for me to like the bad guys, you know? Specially people like Warner, heartless, cruel and mischievous but he is such, such a complex character! Amazingly done, Tahereh! This bad guy, being a cruel soul and all, will leave your heart sad. You will want to hug him, at least once. And then you will want to punch him a lot. Which is normal, believe me.Anyway, my final opinion? Buy the book, read it and treasure it. The end will leave you with a smile in your face and your heart full of hope. The next book will be, for sure, amazing and marvelous. It's impossible to think otherwise.
  • (2/5)
    There was great potential in this idea, and if it's actually executed in the rest of the series then it would most definitely be worth reading. It's enjoyable enough to want to see if something actually happens in the next book but a bit of a disaster in itself. My biggest problem was with the writing style. I realize the numbers are a bit of a theme, but the repeats get annoying get annoying get annoying (see?). It was also annoying that the first hundred pages were mostly simple sentences, fragments, and repeats. There was no description. There really wasn't even anything going on. Actually, that applies to a lot of the book. The plot was nearly non-existent it was so slow. It basically consists of every character sitting around doing nothing, though sometimes saying that they did something rather that showing the characters doing it, until they FINALLY do something, which is the climax of the story. It was entirely too predictable what happens and is filled with a lot of unnecessary fluff. I really hated Juliette. Want a strong female character? NOT HER! Honestly, when you give a slogan like "My Touch is Power" you expect your heroine to be more than the whiny mess that is Juliette. All she does is cry and ask them to kill her...many times...it's really pathetic. Seriously, she tells herself she's strong in one sentence and then just a few sentences later she tells them to shoot her? Adam wasn't much better than Juliette. Warner was also pretty sad, but in a creepy way since he's our antagonist. There is absolutely no way Warner will ever be a real love interest, especially since Juliette and Adam have their insta-love. Okay, okay. Apparently their love developed through all those years they never talked or interacted AT ALL, but do we see that? Not really. We're just told that it did and expected to take that without seeing any kind of development. Kenji...Insert Jar Jar Binks. I think that is the best explanation of his character. I literally threw this book across the room more than once. The ending makes up for the travesty that is the rest of the book only because it sets you up for expecting something to finally happen in the next book and there is the slightest change in Juliette's persona that might make her develop into a character that would be acceptable. Even though I haven't read the second one to know if it's any good, it'd just be better to start with it than waste time with this one. It really only provides a brief history and you'd get the same from a good paragraph synopsis as you do from the whole book.
  • (2/5)
    I got multiple anonymous messages on tumblr telling me to read this book because of a certain amoral love (?) interest. But I kept putting it off because, you know, YA dystopia. And, well, I read it very quickly and I'm... conflicted.
    I liveblogged it on my blog and I spent a lot of time being baffled by the prose. Ok, here's the thing. Purple prose and flowery prose is great when it's done well (think Cat Valente's Deathless or Laini Taylor's Daughter of Smoke and Bone) but it takes a long time for a writer's prose to get to a point where it doesn't just sound ridiculous and pretentious (Cat Valente's early work is messy messy messy). So, this was... a prosaic mess. She used the word Shatter 7 times (I kept count because, you know, if it's in the title it's going to be noticed), she kept likening the protagonist to butter (I... I'm still confused), all the make out scenes the protagonist was on fire (it was always fire. every time. fire.) she used hyperbole to the extreme (like i was genuinely concerned for Juliette's well being because her jaw kept falling off and her organs were always rearranging themselves). My favourite moment was here:

    "Every butterfly in the world has migrated to my stomach."
    Me: THAT'S SO MANY BUTTERFLIES H OLY SHIT

    There was a lot of that. It was, frankly, incredibly distracting. (Also unintentionally hilarious. I understand that most people find this book to be beautifully written, but I just found it really really funny.)
    I'm not saying Tahareh Mafi is a bad writer. Not at all. In fact, I think she's going to be amazing. Once she gets ahold of what she's trying to do with prose and maybe branch out with her metaphors (they were always the same. She had a set group she just cycled through within the story).
    I do think there were some major issues with the editing. Like, I understood the intentional cross outs and paragraph breaks but there were... multiple formatting errors that just... should have been caught early on in the process (dialogue running into itself instead of breaking at a paragraph, things like that). I also think a different font would have fixed a lot. Like, is this being written by Juliette? Because first person POV ≠ a written account and it felt like Mafi had no idea which she was doing. Because the font implied first person, but the paragraph breaks, lack of punctuation (that was MADDENING. I HATED the lack of necessary commas), and cross outs implied hand written. I just wish she could have stuck to a method because all the little things that bothered me wouldn't have bothered me if it had been obvious this was a written account.
    I did have a huge issue with the fact that Juliette was the only girl in the book. Every time a new character was introduced wow surprise another dude. Like. Really. I thought we were past that in YA, but I guess not...
    Another slight issue was the fact that Juliette doesn't... do.... much.... Like, she has this power that kills people with her touch (X-Men. Which was it? Rogue right? Yeah just think Rogue it's pretty similar.) and apparently she's super strong when she's mad? Mostly she just got towed around by the two male characters and that frustrated me. I understand that she'd been locked away for three years so she does need time to adjust but... I dunno... I felt like she never did anything herself.
    I admit, ok, whatever, I'm weak garbage and I loved Warner. Whatever give me the young, bored, power hungry amoral character and I am yours. His scenes were my favourite (also written better? Like the writing improved when he was around?)
    Of course, other love interest, Adam, was stock protective boyfriend because everything is the same always. I liked Adam! Quite a bit actually! But... I felt like I had to suspend a lot of disbelief for the sudden relationship with Juliette and Adam to make sense. Like, yes, they went to school together but they literally never spoke but apparently they were actually always in love together and??? /?????
    Insta-love doesn't do it for me. It didn't help that Warner was a more interesting character (but emily you're biased. Yeah.)
    The dystopia background literally felt like it didn't matter. I don't understand the stakes at all. All the focus was on the romance (and that's fine!) I just wish some time was spent explaining things instead of leaving us entirely in the dark. I keep forgetting that's what dystopia always seems to do in the first book.
    I'll probably finish the trilogy. It only took me a few hours to read this (and it was slow going because I was constantly making tumblr posts about it oops) and tbh I want to know the endgame and what she's doing with the superpowers thing.
    So, yeah 2.5 stars. It wasn't terrible but there were SO MANY weird issues that were distracting.
  • (4/5)
    Synopsis:Juliette hasn't touched anyone in exactly 264 days.The last time she did, it was an accident, but The Reestablishment locked her up for murder. No one knows why Juliette's touch is fatal. As long as she doesn't hurt anyone else, no one really cares. The world is too busy crumbling to pieces to pay attention to a 17-year-old girl. Diseases are destroying the population, food is hard to find, birds don't fly anymore, and the clouds are the wrong color.The Reestablishment said their way was the only way to fix things, so they threw Juliette in a cell. Now so many people are dead that the survivors are whispering war-- and The Reestablishment has changed its mind. Maybe Juliette is more than a tortured soul stuffed into a poisonous body. Maybe she's exactly what they need right now.Juliette has to make a choice: Be a weapon. Or be a warrior. Review:After all the hype about this book I had to read it to find out what the fuss was.The writing style is brilliant. I loved the strikeouts to differentiate what Juliet wanted to feel, and what she was actually prepared to feel. The wayward, jagged train of thought is poignant to a person who has withdrawal from human society, and the randomness of actions was excellent.Gradually as the story continues we don't see as much, as we realise Juliette is becoming accustomed to being around people, or in particular, Adam. Adam, from the start, came across as the good guy and I liked him immediately. The interesting twist as their characters blend is charming and alarming at the same time.Warner is someone we all know, and his clutch on Juliette was way too freaky to be normal.As the story continues it sadly brings us back to normaldom, as we experience boring quirks in the story which I didn't like. About two-thirds in I felt the story slow down to a minimum and it didn't really pick up. It meandered in a direction I wasn't expecting, and I'm not sure I really liked the outcome.I'm not sure why the Author chose to follow the end theme as we were heading in a great direction with the Reestablishment and possibly bringing it down. If Juliette had stayed there and uncovered more anomalies of Warners badness I would have been more satisfied.Instead we get a mixture of The Incredibles and X-men and it all felt a little too easy to follow a set trope instead of a proper dystopian-apocalyptic finale.Needless to say, I will read the second book but I won't rush for it.
  • (4/5)
    Do you hear that? It’s the sound of my swooning. Not only do we have a delicious romance in this debut, but Tahereh Mafi’s writing? It’s the kind I want to melt into.Having been deemed a danger to society after an accident, and given up by her parents, Juliette has been imprisoned in isolation. It’s been 264 days since she’s had any sort of human contact and her only comfort is a notebook. Despite the fact that she’s been mistreated all her life, Juliette is such a good person. I wanted to take her under my wing and take care of her. Then there was another part of me, the Warner side you could say, that wanted her take people down. She does experience some internal conflict, and we do see some of her darker moments, but despite everything she’s gone through, she’s so full of heart.The romance. Oh, the romance! Adam Kent is pretty damn amazing. There are so many sides to him, but he is a perfect boy package if I do say so myself. Going into this, knowing Juliette’s ability, I didn’t expect all that much with the relationship stuff, except maybe some flirtation, but I was so wrong. Juliette and Adam’s scenes are effing HOT. Prepare yourselves, folks, this romance is a good one.Then there’s Warner. He’s awful and all sorts of screwed up and yet…I really, really enjoyed his character. In no way would I excuse the things he did, but he’s so layered that I couldn’t help but be intrigued. There’s still so much to uncover about him, too! After the events that transpired in this one, he’s bound to get more interesting (insaneinsanesinsane).Mafi’s writing is captivating. Normal every day things — breathing! blushing! — are absolutely beautiful when she describes them. There were so many instances when I had to stop and reread what I had just read to fully appreciate the words before me.If I could single out the one issue I had with the book, it would be the ending. It wasn’t that it was bad, but it definitely took me by surprise… In the vaguest way I can say it: the familiar element from this story is being expanded into even more familiar territory and, well, I expected something more. Different. To be fair, though, I’m sure Mafi could bring a fresh twist to the direction and I am definitely excited to see how she does it in the next book.Shatter Me was a a fantastic debut and I can’t wait to get a further look at this story and its characters.
  • (5/5)
    Shatter Me is a book that is pretty much drowning in the vast ocean of hype that it has fallen into. It was in Entertainment Weekly, and other forms of blogs and press. And after reading it, I can officially say that, in my opinion, it is well deserved.Juliette has a unique ability that causes her to drain the life from anyone she touches. (Now this is where people jump to the conclusion and compare her to a widely popular fictional character known as Rogue, from X-Men, who also has this "curse.") To her, she cannot touch anyone because she knows there are fatal consequences—or are there? What follows is a dynamic story filled with steamy romance, delicious villainy, some action, frequent running, and coming to discover exactly what she is capable of, and why she is the object that a cynical yet somewhat alluring villain will stop at nothing to acquire.One of the few issues I had was with the character herself. At times, I adored Juliette. Other times, I just didn't know. She is such an intriguing character that provided me understanding of why she was the way she was, and allowed me to invest some emotion into her, and yet, at times, she offered me nothing but frequent tears and many scenes that made it hard for me to believe she had the qualities of a hero at all. Bravery is one of the most important elements of Hero qualities, and while there were some scenes where she practiced the art, I couldn't really feel it.I understand Juliette. Or do I????Don't get me wrong, Juliette was still a bad-ass character that I did come to like, it just took a while for that feeling to form.Adam, on the other hand, exerts the qualities of being a hero. He is such an awesome character that I absolutely loved and I found myself a tad more invested in reading when he was included in scenes. Warner is another intriguing character I would really like to learn more of in the sequel.If I was asked what I wanted to see in the sequels, my immediate answer would be: MORE SCENES WITH ADAM AND WARNER!I DID feel a faint but distinguishable essence of X-Men-like similarities in this book toward the end like some have said, which I will leave out for possible spoilers. But, Tahereh Mafi has added her own flavor and thrown in some original things to this highly interesting novel that makes for a great read, in my opinion. I highly enjoyed this novel, and can't wait to see how 20th Century Fox will do while adapting this for the big screen. I enjoyed this novel, and I am anxiously waiting for the sequel!Although the copy I read was an Advanced Readers' Edition, I will DEFINITELY be buying a gorgeous final copy.
  • (1/5)
    WARNING: The proceeding review contains some necessary & unavoidable spoilers. It also contains my honest uncensored thoughts, feelings, and opinions. I don't bite my tongue, and I really did not like this book. So, if you can't handle any of that, then I suggest you move along.Alrighty, let's begin. First of all, I honestly did not think anyone could outrank Divergent's Tris on my Most Annoying and Unlikable YA Heroines of the Year list. I was wrong. So very wrong. Juliette from The Emo Diaries Shatter Me most definitely takes the cake...and cries all over it...repeatedly.Yep, as you may have already guessed it, Juliette was probably my biggest issue with this book. For almost the entire story, the chick didn't do much more than whine, cry, tremble, shake, faint/almost-faint, get injured, gasp, freeze in place, blush, and trip over her own feet. Oh wait! Sorry. There's one more thing. She also ogled the male characters around her (cheesetastic villain included) over & over again regardless of how inappropriate the situation or timing happened to be. She was weak, ridiculously melodramatic, and nauseatingly insecure.Now, I know what some of you may be thinking. Juliette had a tough childhood. She was turned into a social pariah, bullied, and locked away in solitary confinement for almost a year. Thus, it's natural for there to be some emotional/psychological ramifications of those experiences. Yes, I agree, and I understand being traumatized and feeling scared & unsure of oneself because of what's happened and because of having such a dangerous ability.However, when faced with frightening, difficult circumstances, there are two types of people that emerge. The first type of individual allows their circumstances to break them—to turn them into a passive doormat unable to do anything but dwell on all of the negativity and on their own shortcomings. The second type of individual takes that fear & pain and channels it into inner strength & determination to eventually try to find a way to change their circumstances—to fight for a better life and not let others define who they are.I wish Juliette had been more of the latter, but unfortunately she was mostly the former. Every couple of pages for the majority of the book, the reader is told by Juliette how much she hates herself, how much she thinks she should die, how helpless & useless she is, how practically everything terrifies her, and how nervous & ashamed she constantly feels. In fact, she didn't really start developing a backbone or a sense of self-worth until the last few chapters, and regrettably this was not done for her own sake, but primarily for Adam's benefit and based almost solely on his love for her. And no, I don't consider her mouthing off to Warner as a sign of bravery & strength (not when she did next to nothing to back it up). Juliette talked the talk, but couldn't walk more than a couple of steps before falling flat on her face.Then there were the following two passages that made me want to bitch slap this book into oblivion:"Warner grips my hips and allows his hands to conquer my body. He tastes like peppermint, smells like gardenias. His arms are strong around me, his lips soft, almost sweet against my skin. There’s an electric charge between us I hadn’t anticipated." "I replay the moment over and over and over in my mind. The split second I took too long to jump from the window. The moment of hesitation that changed everything. The instant I lost all control. All power. Any point of dominance. He’s never going to stop until he finds me and it’s my own fault."Allow me to first address passage #1. Warner is a sociopathic, homicidal, creepy megalomaniac, who wants to manipulate and OWN Juliette like a shiny new toy/weapon. He has her beaten, forces her to hurt others, terrorizes her, and tries to murder the guy she loves. But despite all of that, Juliette (on several occasions) takes a moment to admire how handsome he is, how beautiful his eyes are, and how attractive his voice sounds. On top of that, she apparently finds herself enjoying being kissed by him and describes the experience in a way that implies it to be sexy & romantic.Oh, hell to the no! That is so frakked up on so many levels. How am I supposed to relate to and have respect for such a heroine? Ugh!! I'm thoroughly disturbed & disgusted. And I swear on my beloved jar of Nutella that if I find out Warner gets turned into a love interest in the sequel, I'm gonna go buy a copy of the book just so that I can put it through my paper shredder and then light it on fire (all the while yelling, "Burn motherfrakker, burn!!").Anyways, passage #2 is no less guilty of eliciting my anger. There are two major problems I have with it. Numero uno is that it's essentially an example of victim blaming, which is never okay. Warner is the only one responsible for his actions. He is a damaged, obsessive man-boy driven by his own delusions and twisted desires/motivations. He's the one who chose to hunt Juliette. He's the one who chose not to stop. Juliette did not bring that upon herself. She did not choose to become his prey nor did she do something to encourage his sick behavior. To make a statement to the contrary is beyond perverse & infuriating.Problemo numero dos is that the passage presents this maddening notion that the only way for Juliette to have a sense of control and power is through her superhuman ability. Take that away and what? She's inherently & irrevocably defenseless? She's unable to take a stand, to fight back, and to try to protect herself in other ways? Frak you, book!Sadly, the above complaints make up only the tip of the iceberg. I had many other problems with this book, but for the sake of condensing my review, I've decided to summarize some of them in the following list: - As another reviewer so astutely pointed out, this book is not dystopian fiction. In reality, it is a paranormal romance that takes place in a dystopian setting. - It is also not an action-packed adventure. By my count, there was a total of two actual action scenes. - The romance was sappy (so sappy it made me dry heave a little), and I never felt the love between Adam & Juliette. What I did feel was a whole lot of raging hormones that had the protagonists trying to tear each other's clothes off at the most inopportune times & places. - The unique writing style only worked half the time. In many instances, the strikethroughs & metaphors seemed contrived & convoluted and made little to no sense. The sporadic aversion to proper punctuation, and the random use of frequently random numbers also drove me a bit bonkers. - Too many things were overly convenient & unbelievable. A few examples: both the love interest & bad guy were immune to Juliette's deadly touch, both Juliette & Adam were immune to radiation allowing them to escape from their pursuers, a car with keys in the ignition and bags full of groceries was left behind just when the protagonists needed it the most, Juliette was able to follow a trail of blood directly to the exact location Adam was being held prisoner, and Juliette's superhuman strength miraculously made a brief appearance at the precise moment she needed to break down a steel door. - Plus, what I found to be outright silly was the fact that despite being imprisoned for 200+ days, not allowed out into the sunlight, and provided with very minimal hygienic supplies & food, Juliette doesn't end up looking emaciated & unhealthy (with brittle hair and dull bruised skin) as would be expected. Instead, she ends up looking like a supermodel, and every male she encounters finds her to be irresistibly beautiful & sexy. (Excuse while I try to unroll my eyes from the back of my head.) - Finally, for almost the entire book, there were absolutely no other females present except for Juliette. (I think you can draw your own conclusions from that little tidbit.)