Найдите свой следующий любимый книге

Станьте участником сегодня и читайте бесплатно в течение 30 дней
Belly of Fire

Belly of Fire

Автором Shafinaaz Hassim

Читать отрывок

Belly of Fire

Автором Shafinaaz Hassim

Длина:
135 pages
1 hour
Издатель:
Издано:
Mar 17, 2011
Формат:
Книге

Описание

‘Not only is your story worth telling, but it can be told in words so painstakingly eloquent that it becomes a song.’ – Gloria Naylor

We often configure our lives with a fine veneer of glossing over the facts. Truth, as they say, is stranger than fiction. We’re obsessed with glorifying our telling of the truth, and in so doing, the presentation of ourselves. In this way, there is to be found more truth in fiction. Fiction becomes the perfect vehicle for exploring the nitty-gritty narratives that swirl around us, especially in an effort to make sense of the spaces within which we might find ourselves trapped, disillusioned, powerless or having found a glint of opportunity.
Belly of Fire is a metaphor for the anxiety and fear that we hold within ourselves; the voices of those who are dis-empowered by racism, poverty, war and gendered abuse, voices that remain silenced, are housed as fire in our bellies.
The stories in this collection grapple with real, everyday issues that face ordinary people. The poetry interspersed between them reveals emotions that arise from dealing with these issues, reflecting on them, using them to rebel or act out against the pressures that try to silence us.
The results: seven reflective, compelling stories intertwined with no fewer than twelve contemporary poems that bring out the essence of the themes developed in the narratives.
Some stories may be inspired by or are reflective of personal and shared histories; the reading and re-reading of these narratives validate the reflective opportunities and learning that life presents to us as individuals.

Издатель:
Издано:
Mar 17, 2011
Формат:
Книге

Об авторе

Shafinaaz Hassim is the author of 'Daughters are Diamonds: Honour, Shame and Seclusion - A South African Perspective' (2007) and Memoirs For Kimya (2009). She's also the editor of 'Belly of Fire' (2011) part of the Anthologies for Social Change series. Her recent publication, 'SoPhia' (2012) a novel on domestic violence, has received great acclaim. She has lectured in Sociology at UKZN in Durban, and at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, SA.

Связано с Belly of Fire

Похоже на «Книги»
Похожие статьи

Предварительный просмотр книги

Belly of Fire - Shafinaaz Hassim

Belly of Fire

An Anthology of Hope, Forgiveness,

Redemption and Reawakening

Compiled by

Shafinaaz Hassim

Copyright 2011 © WordFire Press

SMASHWORDS EDITION

The moral right of the publisher as well as

each individual author has been asserted.

Editing: Shafinaaz Hassim

Proofreading: Louis Greenberg

Cover Design: Nielfa Cassiem-Carelse

eBook Published by Wordfire Press, SA @ Smashwords

This ebook is licensed for your personal enjoyment only.

This ebook may not be re-sold or given away to other people.

If you would like to share this book with another person,

please purchase an additional copy for each recipient.

If you’re reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return to Smashwords.com and purchase your own copy.

Thank you for respecting the hard work of these authors.

Contents

Foreword: Shafinaaz Hassim

Use the Shard to Build a Window – Luqmaan Rawoot

Candlelight Dreams – Lubna Nadvi

Girl-Child – Gulshan Khan

When Children Scream – Julekha Kalla

A Million Waves to Wish On – Quraisha Dawood

The Stench of Prejudice – Afzal Moolla

Roots of an Oak Tree – Ori Prakash Luke Ben-Zeev

What Once Was the Sun – Mohammed Hashem

Someday I Will Write – Shafinaaz Hassim

Nirvana – Dia Tauqir

Kabhi … – Lubna Nadvi

Sometimes … – Lubna Nadvi

Land of Betrayal – Nazia Peer

I Am Hate – Camillo Mubarak Zimba

To Be More Like Me – Shafinaaz Hassim

A Way to Be Born – Tasneem Ahmed Basha

Escaping Decay – Sana Ebrahim

Whispers of Freedom – Rassool Jibraeel Snyman

Diary of a First Wife – Shafinaaz Hassim

Glossary

Contributors

Acknowledgements

Foreword

Not only is your story worth telling, but it can be told in words so painstakingly eloquent that it becomes a song.’ – Gloria Naylor

We often configure our lives with a fine veneer of glossing over the facts. Truth, as they say, is stranger than fiction. We’re obsessed with glorifying our telling of the truth, and in so doing, the presentation of ourselves. In this way, there is to be found more truth in fiction. Fiction becomes the perfect vehicle for exploring the nitty-gritty narratives that swirl around us, especially in an effort to make sense of the spaces within which we might find ourselves trapped, disillusioned, powerless or having found a glint of opportunity.

Belly of Fire is a metaphor for the anxiety and fear that we hold within ourselves; the voices of those who are disempowered by racism, poverty, war and gendered abuse, voices that remain silenced, are housed as fire in our bellies.

The stories in this collection grapple with real, everyday issues that face ordinary people. The poetry interspersed between them reveals emotions that arise from dealing with these issues, reflecting on them, using them to rebel or act out against the pressures that try to silence us.

Lubna Nadvi’s story, ‘Candlelight Dreams’, places shack fires in KwaZulu-Natal at centre-stage against a secondary plot of personal struggle.

‘When Children Scream’ unravels a series of nightmares in therapy by a young woman who discovers that she was abused as a child. Julekha Kalla’s story explores what this might mean for her adult life.

Displacement and struggle to reconcile your dreams with others’ expectations is the theme of Ori Ben-Zeev’s ‘Roots of an Oak Tree’. A group of young Jewish friends in South Africa debate going back to Israel and the compulsory military conscription there in this personal exploration on interpersonal narrative than a political statement.

In ‘Nirvana’, Dia Tauqir’s story of thirst is seen through the eyes of an Indian beggar who lives on a sidewalk. The metaphor of a simple thirst is taken to mean a greater yearning for life and freedom.

Nazia Peer needs little introduction as a seasoned writer and the author of House of Peace (2005), one of the pioneering novels of contemporary Indian fiction in the South African literary scene. Her story, ‘Land of Betrayal’, portrays the reflections of a Western Cape medical doctor who volunteers services at a makeshift medical camp for victims of xenophobic violence. Peer shows us how a disillusioned medical professional learns to unearth compassion and a sense of what it is to be human.

Tasneem Basha’s ‘A Way to Be Born’ is a redemptive story about a woman who has never forgiven herself for giving up her baby. When she has to help another woman to give birth she is able to reflect on the cycle of life, and her role in it.

‘Diary of a First Wife’ is the story of a woman who discovers, upon the death of her husband, that she was not his only wife. The ramifications are made worse when a body is found; the body of her husband’s so-called second wife.

The poetry that has been placed with such care between the leaves of these stories has the same flavour of reflection. Some are jarring and informative, asking questions of the reader or forcing efforts to catapult mere thought into action. Gulshan Khan’s ‘Girl-Child’ is one such example, speaking brazenly to issues such as female genital mutilation, death by stoning of rape victims and child prostitution.

Luqmaan Rawoot’s ‘Use the Shard to Build a Window’ dares the reader to break beyond fear, even if she has very little to work with. Rawoot’s writings have an echo of earlier Sufi poetry and the message conveyed is spiritually evocative and metaphysical.

Other works like ‘Whispers of Freedom’ by Rassool Snyman and ‘The Stench of Prejudice’ by Afzal Moolla, do much to uncover the cowardice that we might hide behind in our veiling of nastier truths. Sana Ebrahim’s ‘Escaping Decay’ and Quraisha Dawood’s ‘A Million Waves to Wish On’ are both personally reflective and generally admonishing, as is Camillo Zimba’s ‘I Am Hate’ and Mohammed Hashem’s ‘What Once Was the Sun’. My contributions, ‘Someday I Will Write’, and ‘To Be More Like Me’, also highlight the cry for the voiceless to be given a voice and empowered beyond the structures that assert control over women in particular and individuals in general. The two-fold poetic contributions by Lubna Nadvi speak volumes for the blend of cultural language that informs our thoughts and subsequently our actions. ‘Sometimes’ stands side by side with its lyrical Urdu counterpart ‘Kabhi’, from this talented multi-lingual, multi-genre pen.

The results: seven reflective, compelling stories intertwined with no fewer than twelve contemporary poems that bring out the essence of the themes developed in the narratives.

Some stories may be inspired by or are reflective of personal and shared histories; the reading and re-reading of these narratives validate the reflective opportunities and learning that life presents to us as individuals.

Telling stories is a celebration and a contribution to the collective consciousness of human beings. This is what both the WordFire Press Workshops and this anthology, Belly of Fire, set out to do.

Shafinaaz Hassim

Johannesburg, February 2011

Back to Top

Use the Shard to Build a Window

Luqmaan Rawoot

Is it by the fear of the world

or the fear of your shadow,

that you choose to remain folded

within your self?

Fear is the child of restraint,

The father of defeat,

The mother of dejection.

Disown this family

and use the shard to build a window –

In time you will break through it like the sun!

Candlelight Dreams

Lubna Nadvi

The swirling smoke that rose up from the charred wood remnants of what were once people’s homes made Samia cough as she stood amidst the ruins. She surveyed the damage as she stepped through the remains of pieces of furniture, cooking utensils and children’s toys. A loud crash forced her to turn around to face the falling shack behind her.

Woza,’ a familiar voice called out to her.

Sandile Ndhlela, one of her dearest friends, gestured in anguish and beckoned to her to walk towards him. They were standing in the middle of the informal settlement called Phambili Lane where Sandile lived, and which had just been burnt down by a fire. The locals and some fire-fighters were still trying to extinguish the angry flames; buckets of water and fire hoses seemed to have little effect on the already diminished site.

Hau Samia, thank you for coming as soon as I called.’ He took her hand, shaking it vigorously while his own quivered. She leaned over and hugged him.

‘I’m sorry, Sandile. Is everyone okay? What happened and what time did the fire start?’ she asked.

Eish, Samia, I think it was about after 1-something last night. Tuli and I were asleep in our shack and we heard shouting and smelt smoke and got up. When I went outside, I walked down to the road to see what was happening and that’s where the fire started because it wasn’t on our side. I went to help the guys on that side, but it just spread so fast and now even our shack and all our things are also gone.’

He started sobbing. Samia put her hand on his shoulder and tried to comfort him.

Вы достигли конца предварительного просмотра. Зарегистрируйтесь, чтобы узнать больше!
Страница 1 из 1

Обзоры

Что люди думают о Belly of Fire

0
0 оценки / 0 Обзоры
Ваше мнение?
Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд

Отзывы читателей