Наслаждайтесь этим изданием прямо сейчас, а также миллионами других - с бесплатной пробной версией

Только $9.99 в месяц после пробной версии. Можно отменить в любое время.

Custer

Custer

Автор Larry McMurtry

Читать отрывок

Custer

Автор Larry McMurtry

оценки:
3/5 (9 оценки)
Длина:
249 страниц
1 час
Издатель:
Издано:
Nov 6, 2012
ISBN:
9781451626223
Формат:

Описание

This lavishly illustrated volume reassesses and celebrates the life and legacy of the West’s most legendary figure, George Armstrong Custer, from “one of America’s great storytellers” (The Wall Street Journal).

On June 25, 1876, General George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Cavalry attacked a large Lakota Cheyenne village on the Little Bighorn River in Montana Territory. He lost not only the battle but his life—and the lives of his entire cavalry. “Custer’s Last Stand” was a spectacular defeat that shocked the country and grew quickly into a legend that has reverberated in our national consciousness to this day.

In this lavishly illustrated volume, Larry McMurtry, the greatest chronicler of the American West, tackles for the first time the “Boy General” and his rightful place in history. Custer is an expansive, agile, and clear-eyed reassessment of the iconic general’s life and legacy—how the legend was born, the ways in which it evolved, what it has meant—told against the broad sweep of the American narrative. It is a magisterial portrait of a complicated, misunderstood man that not only irrevocably changes our long-standing conversation about Custer, but once again redefines our understanding of the American West.
Издатель:
Издано:
Nov 6, 2012
ISBN:
9781451626223
Формат:

Об авторе

Larry McMurtry is the author of more than thirty novels, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning Lonesome Dove. He has also written memoirs and essays, and received an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay for his work on Brokeback Mountain.


Связано с Custer

Читать другие книги автора: Larry Mc Murtry

Похожие Книги

Похожие статьи


Обзоры

Что люди думают о Custer

2.9
9 оценки / 7 Обзоры
Ваше мнение?
Рейтинг: 0 из 5 звезд

Отзывы читателей

  • (2/5)
    Meh.

    I am unclear as to why this author chose as his subject someone he clearly does not like and leaves snotty and snarky comments throughout the book.

    Being that this is my first book on Gen Custer, I have no gauge for knowing what is true and what is not, as there are many many reviews on this book that claim it is inaccurate, grammatically incorrect, a bad editing job, etc.

    I will have to read other books because it is very hard to get the truth when someone is writing about someone they clearly do not like or respect.
  • (4/5)
    Listened to this... really enjoyed it!
  • (4/5)
    History on George Armstrong Custer and the Battle of Little Big Horn. This book is filled with a lot of great information and pictures from the period as well as many art depictions of the battle. Great Coffee Table book and history.
  • (4/5)
    Very short read that opens the big questions about what Custer and Little Big Horn mean to American History. One factoid the author repeats is the US government made 341 treaties with the Native Americans and broke every one of them. I may have misremembered the exact number but the author honestly describes himself as no historian but asserts the history is disgraceful. Lots of photographs and reproductions of artwork. As James Joyce said "History is a nightmare from which I'm trying to awake."
  • (5/5)
    Beautifully illustrated "Custer" is a book in which the author's skill resides as much in the text as in the choice of pictures, some early photographs, which reveal the psychology of the participants in their youths and in the case of Custer, in his abbrieved maturity - if he ever had one. They are better than paintings in which artists try to reconstruct the grim reality of the "Last Stand". The Author stated that his intention was to complete a short biography simply because he felt the abundance of existing books about Custer and other Custerology documents did not justify a new narration of the famous battle. Yet he highlights how important was this battle despite the small number of participants and the fact it was "won by the losing side".Yet it remains that the June 25, 1876 cavalry charge of 350 troopers and officers against 2,500.00 Sious and Cheyennes warriors ..."ended the American settlement narrative".A copy of Custer's last written message to Benteen" "Come on, be quick. Be Quick. Bring Packs" are the many details that make McMurtry's book sensational, giving a glimpse into how Custer's life in the plains was perceived by his contemporaries and how it resonates to the present.Admirable book throughout. Tough men or exterminators, the judgement of history will remain that exquisite cultures were nearly anihilated by government officials who signed 350 treaties and broke each one of them. Could the West have been shared with the various native cultures who lived in their territory? The Author leaves Black Elk respond when talking over :Wounded Knee": "I did not know then how much was ended."...
  • (1/5)
    To put it simply, this is a very bad book. Larry McMurtry has written some fine books, but this is not one of them. It feels like he knocked it off over a long weekend. It is full of irrelevant asides; the structure is non existent. It feels like he tossed all the sentences up in the air, and printed them as they fell.The illustrations are beautiful, as they should be in what is essentially a picture book. But there is far too little information included: who painted this? who took this photograph and what was the occasion? This is extremely lazy and irritating.
  • (1/5)
    Custer, by Larry McMurtry, promises to bring the complexity of George Armstrong Custer to life by illuminating his difficult marriage and his glory-seeking in an assessment of Custer’s fame and the power of his personality while redefining the common understanding of the American West. This title is published by Simon & Schuster, ISBN: 978-1-4516-2622-3 as an ebook.The author begins by explaining that his work will cut through much of the irrelevant guesswork that is common in most of the writing on Custer. For example, he seriously questions the necessity of discussing why one corpse was found with 150 arrows in it. It’s irrelevant, he argues. However, in chapter 30, the author expressly raises that very question. After considering CPT Tom Custer’s death, the author is puzzled as to why 105 arrows were found in a body and that this fact should really fascinate “students of mutilation”. The narrative then launches into a lengthy comparison of Fremont, a man who was once employed as a topographer. This rather long section seems to be more of a set up for character assassination than it does with serious historical engagement. The reader is informed that Custer abandoned his men, like Fremont. Custer was court-martialed, like Fremont. Custer wanted to be president, like Fremont. Fremont is not relevant to the purpose of the book.Many of the illustrations are carelessly mislabeled. Most of the photographs have no contextual significance. One picture bears the text “Custer with his horse, Comanche” yet it is not a picture of Custer (it’s Gustav Korn) and it’s not Custer’s horse (it belonged to CPT Keogh). The picture itself was taken long after the battle anyway. Another picture is described as being Custer and the scout Curly in 1876. It isn’t. It is a picture of the scouts Goose and Bloody Knife with Custer in 1874. Lastly, a photo of “Custer and Little Wolf” is actually a photo of C. Lyon Berg taken in 1908. Incidentally Charles L. Von Berg was a known “Custer battle impostor” who claimed that he was the inspiration for Buffalo Bill Cody’s Western tales. Why are those pictures placed in those chapters? What is the relevance? There needs to be some fact checking before Simon & Schuster unleashes this inaccurate study on the public.Other examples of areas that need work are where the author claims General Custer wrote the famous last message, carried by John Martin, to Benteen. He even provides a picture of it with the actual signature, not by Custer, but by the real person who wrote the note, and the historical record bears this out, of Lt. Cooke who was Custer’s adjutant. Another is that this book claims Private Thomas Coleman was the first Soldier to arrive on the battlefield after the defeat. But this is far from true. LT Roe was the first US Soldier to see the carnage from a distance. LT Bradley, from Terry’s command, was the first physically on the battlefield, even performing the first body count before reporting the fate of the 7th Cavalry back to General Terry. Details matter. It is careless to go to print without diligent research. This book is not a reflection of serious study.Overall, I did not find any of this title’s claims to be borne out in the text. I did not find scholarly participation with the subject. Much of what I read was conjecture or inspired by rumor. The errors struck me as minor at first--surely no historian can get every detail right¬--but error compounded error so much that I was overwhelmed by the careless mistakes. I do not believe this is a good introduction to the subject of Custer and the Little Bighorn battle. It does nothing to contribute to the works already available. It does not meet a single of its intended purposes. It holds no content that is new or revealing about the topic.Almost as if the author knew the work was faulty are the final statements appearing after the bibliography where the author accuses most Custer historians of being “peculiar” and “cranky.” Perhaps it is good to listen to cranky, peculiar scholars from time to time in order to avoid academic embarrassment.