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From the Publisher

A selection of Benjamin Franklin’s writings, with an introduction and commentary by renowned author Walter Isaacson.

Selected and annotated by the author of the acclaimed Benjamin Franklin: An American Life, this collection of Franklin’s writings shows why he was the bestselling author of his day and remains America’s favorite founder and wit. Includes an introductory essay exploring Franklin’s life and impact as a writer, and each piece is accompanied by a preface and notes that provide background, context, and analysis.
Published: Simon & Schuster on
ISBN: 9780743274838
List price: $9.99
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