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Tim Ferriss is the author of The 4-Hour Workweek, a New York Times bestseller that incorporates the Pareto Principle and Parkinson's Law into a lifestyle of reduced working hours and more personal free time. After graduating from Princeton University, where he earned a degree in East Asian Studies, Tim started his first business selling nutritional supplements at the age 23. Since selling his business, he has become a Guinness Book Of World Records holder in tango and a host of his own program on the History Channel. Currently working as an angel investor, in 2011 Tim announced he would publish a third book, The 4-Hour Chef. The book is being released by Amazon.com and is expected to become available for purchase in April 2012.

The 4-Hour Workweek is Tim Ferriss' first book. Detailing his personal experiences of success and failures in "lifestyle design", the book provides readers with a clear road map on how to outsource mundane work, reduce clutter and information overload to create smooth income streams and more free time.

The author believes that pursuing dreams and goals now is more important than deferring them until after retirement, and his book promotes a variety of lifestyle design options that give readers exciting alternatives to the ordinary 9-5 routine.

Topics: Reader Guide, Productivity, Success, Career, Goals & Aspirations, Informative, and Inspirational

Published: Hyperink on
ISBN: 9781614647942
List price: $3.99
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